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Eyeplug defines this fairly recent rather vague and loose grouping of music as ‘those that generate mainly processed samples, beats or loops using technology such as PCs and utilising methods of cut‘n’paste via desktop software that embraces filters, plug ins and the like to assemble often strange, artistic, mash-up, collages and soundscapes from their own basements’.

The thing that sets apart the good, from the bad, from the ugly, is the sheer prowess, or educated ‘musicality’ that pioneers a new way of composing often complex edits in a sequence that has a strong narrative and successful communication to its audience.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Beats Tags:,
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Jimi Tenor talks to Eyeplug

Jimi Tenor 

Born 1965 in Lahti, is a Finnish musician. His artist name is a combination of the first name of his youth idol Jimmy Osmond and the tenor saxophone. His band Jimi Tenor & His Shamans released its first album in 1988, whilst Tenor’s first solo album appeared in 1994. “Take Me Baby” became his first hit in 1994. He has released albums on Sähkö Recordings, Warp Records and Kitty-Yo record labels. Tenor has performed several times with the avant-garde big band Flat Earth Society. In 2009, he contributed a cover of an Elektroids song to the Warp20 (Recreated) compilation album, as well as having his song “Paint the Stars” covered by Hudson Mohawke. Eyeplug caught up with him recently for a friendly chat.

01 You were born in Finland in the 1960s, what was your childhood like there?

I lived in a small town called Lahti. I was a very shy child, but I was very active. I played piano and flute at the local conservatory. I was also very interested in theory of music. But I was also into sports and was playing all kinds of sports. Street hockey was a big thing for us.

02 At what stage did you veer towards music as a career direction?

That was quite early. I transferred to a music school and we had a good choir there. There were regular performances with the choir and I always enjoyed performing. Then later when I was 14 I started to play in various bands and that was kind of it. I really loved everything that had to do with bands. The music, hanging out. That’s what I wanted to do.

03 What were your early musical inspirations?

Finland in those days was a special place. The radio was really old school and wouldn’t play much the kind of music that I was interested in. But I remember from early childhood big radio hits like Sergio Mendez’ “Mas Que Nada”, some Beatles hits, Harry Belafonte. But at home we would listed to The Rolling Stones, Iggy and the Stooges. OK these are things that people know internationally, but what I would really hear everywhere in Finland was Finnish music. Mostly it wasn’t anything I was interested in until Punk Rock happened. Finnish Punk Rock was quite brutal, very lo-fi. I loved that.

04 How did you develop as an Artist and a Creative outlook?

I have always been interested in repetition. I don’t have a “golden ear” or perfect pitch so sometimes it’s a bit hard for me to hear very complicated chords. Maybe that’s why I naturally have been drawn into repetition and music that doesn’t have too many changes. I saw a TV series about minimal music and that was important. I got into the idea of shamanism, on order to try to get to another mental state via repetitious music. I formed a band called the Shamans. To be honest we weren’t anywhere near repetitious enough to get to another level! Later on I found an article about Futurism and Luigi Russolo. I wanted to make my own noise machines and make music, without keys or chords.

05 How did you find the dynamic of forming bands and working with others?

I like playing in bands and hanging out, but I don’t like to organize rehearsals, equipment, transport. Also calling people and making sure everybody is going to come to rehearsal space is a drag. So at some point I got into drum machines and found electronic music. It was interesting technically, but also socially. I enjoy being alone and with drum machines I could do cool stuff. I noticed that with a machine making repetitious music is much easier. In fact it’s really hard to make any changes. The old drum machines were not so sophisticated when it came to changing patterns, so you needed to work to get things out of them. And that’s exactly what I liked. I enjoy the struggle.

06 What challenges have you encountered and how have things changed over the years?

One of the biggest challenges was to get out of Finland. Finland was mentally far away and I wanted to do stuff. So we started to play in Berlin in mid-80’s and got some ideas how things are done. But one of the biggest challenges has always been the language. I like music with vocals and I like to sing a little bit. I tried to find an angle where I could sing in English and make some kind of sense. Make simple lyrics. Of course I could sing in Finnish, but the way the world is it’s hard to to get gigs outside Finland if you sing in that language. Like Japanese people also most Finnish people listen to English language music as instrumental music. What I mean for us the language is mostly sounds, different syllables. The lyrical content doesn’t mean much to us, the main thing is the sound and the feeling. Maybe I’m simplifying a bit, but that’s more or less the case. Of course these days I do understand quite a bit, but still if I go to sing English language songs in karaoke, I will definitely need the lyrics underneath.

OK now the world is very different from 80’s. It’s easy to get contacts wherever in the world. I think the new challenge is to try to keep a certain amount of mystery about oneself. If you expose all your secrets in social media, you become a local guy so to speak. And you can’t be a messiah in your own country. Your place in the social media is your new country in a way.

I guess one challenge is to make enough money to survive. For me things have been quite similar always. You play gigs and sell records after the shows. That is still very much valid. Sure, some big names made plenty of money in the 70s, 80s , 90s from record sales. I never really experienced that lifestyle. Maybe briefly in the 90s but that money went into all kinds of nonsense like video clips.

07 What types themes do you embrace within your compositions?

Lyrically I try to use plenty of metaphors. But the basic themes are always pretty much the same: Love and our place in the universe. That’s about it for me. I do a lot of pseudo scientific lyrics, titles like “Selfish Gene” and “Black Hole”, but they are love and sex in the end. Having said all this about lyrics I have to point out that most of my music is instrumental. 90%. I think it’s easier to talk about lyrics than music. I would really love to do long interviews about theory of music and what I try to go for in terms of composition, but I find it hard to explain anything in short interviews. But when I start writing a new piece, I try to go for something fresh. Not always start with piano, or drum machine. I one always starts with piano, like many do, then you end up having music that is good for piano. For example when I write music for afrobeat band, I would try to get a rhythm going that is natural for that specific band. I think about the players and what they can do. In this sense I agree with John Cage: you need to know the musicians you’re writing for. You need to know the band, and then when I do horn lines, I play them with horns on the demo. I don’t play them with keyboard because keyboard is not a horn. I don’t want to play keyboard lines with my saxophone! Even when I do big band music, I try to play the parts myself. Get into the feeling how playable a part is and how musical it is.

08 How do you technically prepare for the studio side of your work?

That depends. When I’m in my own studio I use drum machines, sequencer, a couple of synths, flute and sax. That’s my normal thing, but I use a lot of percussion, DIY instruments. I try to have a mike always ready to go right next to my chair. I work really fast. I get an idea and I will play it with my flute or sax. I don’t know it’s it’s a technical aspect, but I try to get something down right after my first morning coffee. If I have hard time figuring out a melody I would wait until next morning and try to do it after one cup of coffee. It usually works out. I’m talking about rough ideas here. But I don’t necessarily make a difference between demos and final recordings. I would say about 40% of my releases were originally recorded as demos. You never know when the right feeling is there. So I record everything with a good mike and good sound. My studio is a horrible mess, but I’m very strict about the signal that goes to the recording device. Everything high quality and no extra nonsense in the signal path. No buzz, hum, or noise. Unless it’s required of course. When I record horns I try to get a little bit of feeling of the room where it was recorded at. I don’t enjoy really dry saxophone or vocals sound. I want there to be a bit of life in the recording.

09 How do you find playing live these days, what stands out and why?

I enjoy it very much. Those are the moments I feel alive. I haven’t noticed any big changes of how I feel on stage. Maybe a bit more relaxed these days. I ‘ve noticed that I’m more comfortable playing saxophone these days. Experience helps. Flute playing is the most natural thing for me and I feel wonderful when I play solos. It just flows.

10 What is your typical productive or creative day like, what shape does it take? What would make it a succesful day?

Like I said it starts with coffee and then I have immediately a writing session for about one hour, sometimes more if I have a deadline. I start really early, you know 8am or 9am. Most of my ideas are gone by 11 o’clock and then I start doing the arrangements and the less intuitive things. Then I go to get some food and afternoons I run errands, take my kids to hobbies. In the evenings I tend to do more music. Might get more ideas, but that happens seldom. When we go to studio with a band then of course those days are full on creative rush. We don’t go to studio that often and the time there is always very restricted. So once you’re in there you have to go for it! But those days are special. Normally I do my music in a disciplined way. Everyday, but not too much. I don’t want to ruin the fun side of it.

11 How do you feel the wider Music Industry relates to artists such as yourself? Do you have strong thoughts on how it works today?

I don’t exists for them. I don’t think I have any role in the mainstream music industry. And I guess that’s fine. They can keep their “idols” TV-shows and all that. I don’t want to have anything to do with Live Nation and that kind of bullying music business. Having said that, it’s kind of hard to avoid Live Nation. They’re everywhere. I’m happy that there is an underground scene and I belong there. I don’t need to talk to A&R people, I don’t need to do show-case gigs.

I like the idea of digital releases, but I’ve noticed people don’t take releases seriously if they have only been released in digital format. That might change quite soon. LPs are back and that’s fun but I don’t care about the formats that much, as long as I hear the music I’m fine.

12 Being from Finland, yet living and working in various other Cities and places, do you retain a spirit or deep flavour of your homeland, how does that manifest itself?

I don’t try to sound Finnish on purpose, but I think my music still sounds Finnish. That’s fine with me because that’s who I am and I’m thankful that I have that special flavor. I have worked and I still work from people around the world. It’s easy to get lost in the multitudes of sounds and styles that I’m exposed to. I want to embrace different cultures but same time I want to be myself.

13 Please tell us about your recent work?

Well, I did a single for Philophon calld ‘Tropical Eel, Order of Nothingness.’ That came out in March 2016. I released a big band album on Herakles Records called ‘Mysterium Magnum’ in Sept 2015. At the moments we’re working on an “Itetune” album. Itetune is a band that uses only DIY instruments. We actually finished the mixing last night and it’ll be out on Sähkö Recordings. We’re also working ona new album with Jimi Tenor & Kabukabu.

14 What plans have you got for 2016 and beyond?

2016 I will play gigs here and there. Jori Hulkkonen and I will perform our film “Nuntius” in Vilnius on June 17th. Nuntius is a special project. It’s a silent film that will not be released. It can only be seen when Jori and I perform it live. I mean we do the music live. Sometimes our actor Mr Normall also appears on stage as himself, so the project has a bit of theatre in the mix.

15 Can you tell us a short, funny story please?

I asked my North Korean friend “how’s it going”. He said “Can’t complain!”


Discography

Jimi Tenor and his Shamans
Total Capacity of 216,5 Litres; LP (1988, Euros)
Diktafon; CD/LP (1989, Poko Records)
Mekanoid; CD/LP (1990, Poko Records)
Fear of a Black Jesus; CD/LP (1992, Bad Vugum)

Solo
Sähkömies; Digital/CD/LP (1994, Sähkö Recordings)
Europa; Digital/CD/LP (1995, Sähkö Recordings)
Intervision; Digital/CD/LP (1997, Warp)
Venera; EP/CD, (1998, Warp)
Organism; Digital/CD/LP (1999 Warp/Sire Records)
Out Of Nowhere; Digital/CD/LP (2000, Warp)
Cosmic Relief; Digital/EP, (2001, Sähkö Recordings)
Utopian Dream; Digital/CD/LP (2001, Sähkö Recordings)
Higher Planes; Digital/CD/LP (2003, Kitty-Yo)
Beyond The Stars; Digital/CD/LP (2004, Kitty-Yo)
ReComposed by Jimi Tenor; Digital/CD/LP (2006, Deutsche Grammophon)
Live in Berlin; Digital (2007, Kitty-Yo)

With Abdissa Assefa
Itetune; LP (2011, Temmikongi)
With Kabu Kabu[edit]
Sunrise; EP/CD (2006, Sähkö Recordings)
Joystone; Digital/CD/LP (2007, Sähkö Recordings)
Mystery Spot; 7″ (2008, Sahco Records)
4th Dimension; Digital/CD/LP (2009, Sähkö Recordings)
Mystery of Aether; Digital/CD/LP (2012, Kindred Spirits)

With Tony Allen
Inspiration Information Volume 4; Digital/CD/LP (2009, Strut Records)

With Lary 7, Mia Teodoratus; Soft Focus
Soft Focus; Digital/LP (2013, Sähkö Recordings)

With Nicole Willis; Cola & Jimmu
Enigmatic; Digital/CD/LP (2013, Herakles Records)
I Give To You My Love And Devotion; Digital/CD/LP (2014, Herakles Records)

With Nicole Willis & The Soul Investigators (As also Jimmy Tenor)
You Better Change/Raw Steaks; 7″ (2003, Sahco Records)
If This Ain’t Love (Don’t Know What Is)/Instrumental; 7″/Maxi/WL/CD (2005/2007, Timmion Records/Above The Clouds/Differ-Ant)
Keep Reachin’ Up; Digital/CD/LP/Cass (2005/2006/2007/2008, Timmion Records/Mit-Wit Records/P-Vine Records/Light In The Attic/Above The Clouds/Differ-Ant)
My Four Leaf Clover/Holdin’ On; 7″ (2006, Timmion Records)
Feeling Free/Instrumental; 7″ (2006/2007, Timmion Records/Above The Clouds)
Tell Me When/It’s All Because Of You; 7″ (2013, Timmion Records)
Tortured Soul; Digital/CD/LP (2013, Timmion Records/P-Vine Records)
Paint Me In A Corner/Where Are You Now; 7″ (2015, Timmion Records)
Happiness In Every Style; Digital/CD/LP (2015, Timmion Records)
One In A Million/Instrumental; Digital/7″ (2015, Timmion Records)
Let’s Communicate/Instrumental; 7″ (2015, Timmion Records)

With Nicole Willis featuring Tony Allen
All For You/Touching; 7″ (2015, Sahco Records)

With Myron & E with The Soul Investigators
Broadway; Digital/CD/LP (2013, Timmion Records)

With Willie West & The High Society Brothers
Lost Soul; Digital/CD/LP (2014, Timmion Records)

With The Soul Investigators
Vulture’s Prayer/Bad Viberations; 7″ (2015, Timmion Records)
Soul Groove; Digital/CD/LP (2015, Timmion Records)

With UMO Jazz Orchestra
Mysterium Magnum; Digital/CD/LP (2015, Herakles Records)

Website
jimitenor.com

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

April 22, 2016 By : Category : Articles Beats Dark Exotica Front page Interviews Jazz Music Pop 0 Comment

DozenQ – Christopher Bell

Cellist and multi-instrumentalist Christopher Bell blends the classical and pop worlds. Clarinet, acoustic guitar, beat boxing and cello recorded live into dense soundscapes. Hip hop beats, gentle fugues, jazz and blues all wrapped up into his own brand of Quirky Pop. For fans of Paul Simon and Andrew Bird.

01. How did you get started in music?

I started as a drummer 20 years ago and switched over to cello.

02 .Where did your direction come from?

Checking out all sorts of different music and seeing how they could fit together.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

Randy Newman, Paul Simon, Andrew Bird.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I’ve started studying eastern classical music as well as getting more into jazz
as well.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

Having a lot of fun, maybe learning something, and seeing that classical instruments can be cool.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Usually i just take something that happened in my own life and exaggerate it out, make it happen to someone dumber.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Even though the songs can be based off real life, they’re less about me, and more about characters.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

My biggest challenge was learning how to put in the work to achieve this, I just had to canoe 550 miles! Really taught me how to do something big its just a day
at a time.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

There’s too many to count.

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Hopefully still playing.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

I would have loved to sit in on a session with Louis Armstrong, even if I was just playing the tambourine.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

New music in within the next year, after I finish the next semester back at college, excited to put all this new knowledge to work.

Web Links:

www.thechrisbell.com
christopherbell.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/thechrisbellcello
twitter.com/thechrisbell
www.youtube.com/user/silenthomerecords
soundcloud.com/thechrisbell/sets/rust

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

April 10, 2016 By : Category : Beats Blues DozenQ Front page Interviews Jazz Music Pop Tags:,
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J-Walk reviewed by Nick Churchill

J-Walk: Off Beat

Tracks: 10, Website: www.wonderfulsound.com

Label: Wonderfulsound

Having all but invented Gnarls Barkley at the turn of the century, long before Messrs Mouse and Green had got off the cheese board, Manchester’s soul shakedown groove machine J-Walk channelled vintage skeletal Stax and ballsy bossa nova funk on the dancefloor’s shining light of the year 2000, the stonewall classic Soul Vibration.

While Martin Fisher and Martin Desai have no doubt found plenty to fill their time over the last decade or so, they just haven’t called any of it J-Walk, but here they are again with new material, a new label and a new mission to get us on the collective good foot.

Delving into the squiggles, scratches, beeps and squelches of vintage analogue tech they’ve applied a forensic attention to detail in order to resurrect only the dustiest music library breaks and beats as they unfurl a brand spanking new map of rootsy electronic art in the shape of Off Beat.

Yes, it’s chock-full of samples and beats made by plugging stuff into a power supply, but make no mistake, human hands are all over this record. Not only is their cover of Paddy Kingland’s BBC Radiophonic classic Vespucci an absolute blinder, you’ll wonder why people don’t stroke beards and smoke pipes when this stuff is on. Perhaps they do.

Do not adjust your set, these crackles put the snap and pop into some wonderful melodies that revile digital simulation, they want only solid state sounds – a kind of ‘trad’ electronics if you will, electro-folk. Anyone who ever doubted the geek shall inherit whatever they ruddy well like need go no further than the cut and dried grooves of Mexicali Hoodoo or Fuzzy Dunlop to know the boffins got the best tunes and to hell with the rest.

Yesterday’s Crowd soundtracks a crazy heist caper that involves a getaway in a souped up Lotus Cortina and Swinging Brick sounds like the opening music to an Open University programme about urbanisation from the 1970s, but We’re Not Alone is a chill out stroller, all socks off, sandals and finger clicks down by the water’s edge. Electric Dancing Song is more buzzy – like Moroder toying with Mike Oldfield while The Sonics’ Larry Parypa knocks out some riffery. The aptly titled World Inaction, on the other hand, makes you feel all fuzzy like the bright new morning after the night that never happened.

Strange, crazy, but decidedly true. BUY HERE!

Nick Churchill

Nick Churchill has written professionally for more than 25 years. Currently a busy Journalist undertaking a wealth of celebrity interviews and human interest features to writing speeches, generating web and media content and production scripts. His first book, Yeah Yeah Yeah: The Beatles & Bournemouth - got great reviews. He has also worked on projects for Duncan Bannatyne, Harry Hill, James Caan, Scott Mills and Peter Dickson, the voice of The X Factor. His obvious passion for words and natural genuine integrity is most refreshing.

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June 27, 2014 By : Category : Beats Music Reviews Tags:, ,
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Cauldronated speak to Eyeplug

Cauldronated are A punky, drum-centric, techno adventure featuring Eva Menon (Italian extrasolar poetess), David Harman and Dave Barbarossa (Drummer with Adam and The Ants, Bow Wow Wow, Republica, Chicane…

01 How did you first get started in music?

I deputised for the drummer in Adam and The Ants and Adam took me on.

02 Where did your direction come from?

My love of music and the drums.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I despise artificial passion in music, I can smell it like shit on my shoe. Far to many influences to mention.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I am driven to create uniqueness. Anytime I’ve gone the straight route in music, I’ve been deflated. ‘Cauldronated’ is a strange brew; House/tehcno scenery, impassioned alien vocals and mental drums.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows?

Complete commitment to the instrument. Spellbinding singer, modern sounds.

06 How do you begin your song creation? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

From a beat, or a groove, a vocal line, everything is thrown into the Cauldron. The themes are historical yet, futuristic.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

I have followed my heart. I play what pleases me.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

To not sell myself out. To follow the teachings of geniuses I have worked with.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I don’t play them.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

‘Top o’ the world ma!’

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Cauldronated.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

More mental beats, Italian style and heady grooves, all live, all full-on.

Web Links:

cauldronated.com
facebook.com/cauldronated
facebook.com/BarbarossaBeat
soundcloud.com/cauldronated

Cauldronated @ The Finsbury – 21st Nov 2013

A welcome blast of superheated noise from the stage of this vast Manor House pub on one of the year’s coldest nights, Cauldronated lived up to my every expectation. Hard to believe that it takes just two people to make this brimming, bone shaking sound, the beat provided by Dave Barbarossa, veteran of such chart-bruising acts like Adam and the Ants, Bow Wow Wow and Republica, the voice and yet more drum work courtesy of the mysterious Eva Menon, she of the dark locks, tattoos, and more than a nod to the classic female rock stars of the much missed late 1970’s. With just a hint of synth to flesh out the sound, this heady brew showed its strength from the word go.

Playing the ice maiden with considerable relish, a huge 80’s cut jacket thrown over her slight shoulders, Eva glares, struts and swerves in front of her mike, coldly intoning the bullet-point vituperative lyrics, as synths wail and scream, Dave pounding out a thunderous beat that will tolerate no dissent. Difficult to characterise in one heading, Cauldronated seem to inhabit a world of their own making, somewhere in the wastes between rock, synth pop and trance, but without getting enmired in any of them.

Every young woman who ever picked up a microphone in anger seems to be embodied in Eva, her Siouxsie/ Ronny persona showing up most of today’s so-called cougars for the compliant puppets they really are. Dave’s enviable drum pedigree ensured a solid wall of rhythm for every song, with their electronic friend’s unobtrusive wailing a perfect backup.

Throwing her huge jacket aside, revealing a one-piece man-drag outfit that perfectly complemented her onstage self, Eva’s voice ran the gamut from Siouxsie to Poly, with even a suggestion of Diamanda, as she spat out yet more bile to the accompaniment of the screaming synth and rumbling drums which she shared stage with.

Scenester

Scenester lives in London and Brighton, as time allows. Enjoys music, film, television, books, design and anything else which won’t leave well alone. Old enough to know better.

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November 12, 2013 By : Category : Beats Dark DozenQ Gigs Instruments Interviews Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , , , ,
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DozenQ – FOG project

This entry is part 2 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

FOG project was an idea hatched during a fog drenched, cold and wet evening walk to the pub in October 2011. The manifesto is to record dark electronic songs but mask them in a joyful way.

Originally our debut song Tired was recorded in a booze fuelled recording session. A few people who heard it went mental over it and convinced us put it out.

We did – and with a little help we infiltrated the UK’s capital attaining radio play at BBC Radio London, XFM London and at one point Radio 1, but we didn’t hear it ourselves.

Our studio is in a constantly shifting state and is often pulled apart and rebuilt in different locations. We’ve even tried recording in the car but the laptop battery went flat before we could really do anything.

01 How did you get started in music?

We met at an amateur dramatic group and realised we had an equal interest in writing and recording music. We shared demo tapes and decided to give recording together a try and it just worked and has continued to work.

02 Where did your direction come from?

A natural love and need to create art. It sounds corny but it’s something we both do like it’s heaven sent. Sure we both struggle creatively from time to time but it’s not meant to be easy is it!

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

We don’t like the idea of despising other musicians. They’re just doing what they do whatever their driving factor is. If they make an unappealing noise then we just don’t listen. Whatever you do or say the music is still there afterward so that hatred never really achieves anything.

Collectively we share a similar taste in music from the likes of Prince, the Beatles, U2, Gary Numan, Radiohead, MGMT, Thomas Dolby and many more. It all influences us somewhere but we try and remain true to ourselves and create music for ourselves.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

It could be anything really. A bad day or news report could influence a narrative whereas daily sounds like a pneumatic drill or hammering in a certain way or pattern could inspire a rhythm or groove. Ste once heard a song in the distance wrongly and drew a completely new song from it which amazingly didn’t sound like the one he had heard wrong.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We’re not a live act, we’re songwriter / producers so don’t have any plans to get out on the road as most of our music would be just backed via a computer. We could technically just press play and then go to the pub but I don’t think that would go down well with a crowd. Festivals we would consider. We would stay out of the pub for them.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

It can vary. Sometimes the lyrics come first other times the music does. Our songs usually carry quite a dark message if you stop and listen to them and this can be reflected in the music sometimes but usually we create a contrast between then words and the overall sound of the tune. Subject matter is usually relating to life, loves and pain – however we have recorded a track about an abandoned Third Reich robot project called Heil Robot so anything goes really.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

Largely we’ve just got better equipment and software and our skills in producing have developed over time. Other than that if you listen to our early work compared to today we’ve remained consistent.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge continues even today which is trying to get our music out to the masses. Everyone says social media is the way forward but it just isn’t. We have our pages but interaction is so slack and it’s not been for the want of trying to engage our fans. We very quickly accepted that nothing has changed, you still need pluggers, you still need a PR machine and at the very least you need to be able to make friends with industry people and be able to ring round and get your music played wherever you can.

Understanding how radio stations work, how they’re play listed and which stations are owned by big groups helps because you know who to target with your music and who to not bother with. This isn’t something you overcome – you just have to keep on keeping on and keep the faith. One day your music will fall onto a really useful persons desk… one day that day will be yours!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We don’t do covers. We barely have time to write and record our own music never mind other peoples. Sometimes we’ll nick bits from other songs though, that’s always good for a laugh because people never notice.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

We’ll still be churning out the music; doing it independently and wherever the music takes us you can guarantee we’ll be happy.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Nobody springs to mind I’m afraid. We’re such fast workers that anyone who we joined with would probably walk out in frustration after the first few hours. We don’t like faffing around too much – the pubs are calling.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

We’ve got an album coming out before the end of 2013 called “Zoltar Speaks” and it will be available on iTunes and Amazon MP3. No Spotify for us anymore – streaming music is grim because it does away with a need to commit to a band or artist. Years ago your only option was to buy an album either on vinyl, cassette or CD and once you did you would feel an obligation to listen to the whole thing because you’d bought it so you might as well.

With MP3’s that’s all gone. You don’t have to buy an album; you only have to buy the tracks from it that you like which are usually the ones you’ve heard on the radio – so you’re letting other people make your mind up for you. The sense of exploration has gone.

Even with streaming you only get 30 seconds into a track and you find yourself skipping it to something you know. It’s all too immediate; it’s all destinations and no journey. It’s such a shame but we’d rather people buy a track and become our spiritual friend rather than stream and discard us.

The next single will also feature a special puzzle that you can do on our website: fogproject.co.uk, In order to get a copy of the MP3 you will need to solve a puzzle and in doing so you unlock various parts of the track. Unlock them all and you get the full track otherwise you end up with just bits – you might end up with just the drums or perhaps bass and vocals. It should be fun.

Web Links:

www.fogproject.co.uk
www.facebook.com/fogprojectofficial
www.twitter.com/FOG_project
www.reverbnation.com/fogmusic
www.soundcloud.com/fogmusic
www.youtube.com/fogproject

Link to buy the current single: itunes.apple.com/we-are-one-single

 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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August 29, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Eyeplugs Front page Industrial Interviews Music Pop Post-punk Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Everett James

This entry is part 14 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Everett James began his musical journey in Asheville, North Carolina. Born in to a musical family he learned the art from his father and performed with his sister throughout his youth. Educated classically and through real world experience, Everett is influenced by a vast variety of artists from Miles Davis, George Clinton, Prince, James Brown, Stevie Wonder, RUN DMC, Tribe Called Quest, to J-Dilla. Live or in the studio, Everett pushes urban music forward and brings the rich legacy of the blues to the future. He took some time out to chat with Eyeplug.net…

01 How did you get started in music?

I was born in to a musical family. My father sang and played in bands when I was a child. He would take me along with him to band practice when I was in pre-school. I’d follow the band mates around and try my hand at making noise on the various instruments. My older sister and I were propelled in to music before we had any choice. We were both performing in front of crowds as children. My father, who is an engineer by trade, later opened a studio in our home. I was constantly surrounded by great musicians and encouraged when they took notice of my talent. I wrote my first song at 7 and was producing music at 12.

02 Where did your direction come from?

My direction defiantly came from my mother. She was the disciplinarian of the family and insisted if we were going to do anything we had to do our best. She made us practice and taught me to be a leader instead of a follower. She is an amazingly creative woman and inspired me to be embrace being different. The discipline is what continues to push me in my career when I go through the ups and downs of this music business.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

When music became a serious thing for me I was totally in to hip-hop. My mother absolutely hated it! I liked the early punk rebellious attitude of it. The first record I ever bought was RUN DMC produced by Rick Rubin. LL Cool J, NWA, Slick Rick, and Public Enemy were my first huge influences. Producers like Rick Rubin, Marley Marl, Prince Paul, and Hank Shocklee were HUGE! Then one day, I was listening to a De La Soul song and my father pulled out a George Clinton album and said…This is where that song came from. From there I learned how to dig and because a student of music. James Brown, P-Funk, Prince, & Stevie Wonder became a part of my vocabulary. I continued to expand my musical vocabulary and was introduced to Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, and Bob Marley. I am open to various styles of music and really enjoy all creative expression. I’ll go from the Ramones to Chopan!

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Currently, my life and technology (or the lack of) inspire me. I write and create from a very introverted place and still have this rebellious punk attitude when it comes to trends. My latest album was a reaction to becoming too digital. I found myself staring at computer screens and programming music. I felt like I lost myself in some digital world and that I had to rediscover who I was. I turned the computer off, picked up the guitar, a pen, and pad. I had to go back to where I started and rediscover what it was about music that I enjoyed so much. This album and sound is without the influence of sequencers or digital music. It is focused on the feeling of expressing who I am imperfections and all. I yearned for the feeling I got as a kid when I would bang on the drums, crank up the guitar, and say whatever I felt at the moment.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Expect to see a real musician playing music. Even if I choose to do a fully digital set you will discover that I am a musician. I play music. I improvise. You will never get the same show twice and you never know what to expect from me. I can fit in several different settings and pride myself in being versatile.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I usually start with some kind of melody in my head. I know its a good one because it won’t leave my mind until I get around some kind of instrument. I play all the instruments on my productions so I’ll start with the one that I hear the melody on in my head. Sometimes that is the piano, bass, or guitar. Other times a phrase will stick out in a conversation I was having or in my mind. Then i write first. I hardly ever scribble or edit when I write. I try to just get the idea out as quickly as possible before I get distracted or confused. I write about my life…always have. It may be in some kind of code but the themes and subjects always have some personal meaning.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

Well… I became a better musician with age. I also have more life experiences to write from.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

The biggest challenge is always staying true to art and surviving. When your young and idealistic you have this grand idea of what it would be like as a musician. Twenty years later in to your career you have your “what the f*ck and I doing” moments. Thats where the discipline and the love for the art must overcome your emotions. Thats why I have to abandon the trends and just make the music I love to make. I realized that its the feeling of freedom I got when i was a kid making noise that I loved. Not the fame, the money, or the illusion of success. Now I am not denying that I wish to have huge fame, millions of pounds, and international success. I am just saying thats not why I do it. I make music to be free!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I play covers all the time! Covering great artists is the best way to educate yourself as a musician. Its how I get better.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

I am in the process of expanding my music career and producing younger artists. I feel that my next step is to discover and cultivate other artists who feel the same way I feel about the music. In 5 years, I hope to have established my music production/publishing company as a world wide leader in urban alternative music with a stable of artists who all rebel against trends.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Wow… Prince. Rick Rubin. Paul McCartney. Flying Lotus. Dr Dre.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

My latest album titled ‘I AM’ will be released this fall/autumn.

Web Links:
735music.com/everettjames
facebook.com/sireverettjames
735music.bandcamp.com
soundcloud.com/735music
twitter.com/everettjames

Tour dates
Link to buy the current single
www.735music.bandcamp.com

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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August 5, 2015 By : Category : Beats Blues DJs DozenQ Front page Funk Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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DozenQ – Galilee

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

GALILEE is an electronic alter ego of  the multi-genre  allrounder musician, songwriter, producer Douglas Garnett also known as DiGDuGDisaster. ‘Robot Arms’ is the debut e.p. on VOD Recordings and contains songs recorded between 2002 and 2013.

Review of current EP – Robot Arms 

Much like popular electronic acts such as Squarepusher, Download or Amon Tobin, Douglas Garnett’s electronic project Galilee mixes equal parts innovation and accessibility, blissfully coloring outside the lines on the 2013 EP release entitled “Robot Arms”. The EP blends a series of electronic genres and each track is radically different, yet all cohesive and a necessary part of the journey.

“Hermetically Sealed” glitches and tweaks it’s way along, taking a Skinny Puppy/cevin Key influence and colliding it with some dubstep for good measure. This is hard hitting headphone music to be sure. “Robot Arms” is a driving, nose-through-the-wall listening experience perfect for frantic dancing or even deep contemplation, strange as that sounds. Garnett has the dreamer’s disease, and this bodes well for his music, which has a sense of depth beyond the choice of sound.

“Welcome To The End” continues along similar lines, while introducing Garnett’s distorted vocals and pop/indie sensibilities in support of another driving beat. Somehow, this introduction to the end is comforting and even celebratory. Other recommended tracks include “Wishing”, which seems to start as a slow burner before embarking on a wild dupstep ride and a wonderfully odd symphonic synth that the Cheshire Cat himself would enjoy.

“Day To Day” brings the feeling of comfort and sadness we’d expect from Adore-era Pumpkins, as Garnett’s pop sensibility and lead vocal comes into play again. Possibly the highlight of the album is “The Saddest Video Game”, which needs to be heard rather than described, as it’s choice of instrumentation and samples rank highly in the innovation category. It’s a listen that places you in an an alternate world. “Kojak” rounds out the EP with a bonus track, and probably the closest thing you’re likely to hear to a club single.

All in all, fans of interesting, artful electronic music should flock to Galilee, and rightfully so. Highly recommended listening.
James Moore, author & publicist

independentmusicpromotions.com

01 How did you get started in music?

In 5th grade music class my teacher made me learn some guitar chords because I couldn’t sing very well in the choir and I needed something to do for our recital. A few years later I became obsessed with rock music and guitar, taking a short detour with saxaphone in 7th grade. I started my first ‘band’ in 8th grade. We were terrible but I fell in love with all things rock and roll.

02 Where did your direction come from?

I started out listening to radio and ‘classic rock’ that’s where I learned song structure and melody. As I got older I branched out into all types of music, including electronica, house, industrial and techno and that’s where GALILEE came in.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

The list of influences is ever evolving, but I can say that I like artists that bring something original to the table. As far as electronic artists go, I really dig Infected Mushroom, Bassnectar, deadmau5, Nero, NIN, old Pigface. As far as who I despise, well, I guess I just try not to listen to stuff I don’t like so I don’t judge since music is always about the listener and it’s so subjective. I guess I can safely say I’m not a huge fan of Justin Beiber and prefab pop icons that don’t write or create their own music. But I don’t despise him either, he’s just a kid making loads of cash for what he does, whatever that is.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I like to experiment and not stay too long in one place musically that is. That’s something listeners will notice right away on the ‘Robot Arms’ e.p. Right now I want to start pushing boundaries of what’s considered electronic music, since it’s a format that really should be as limitless as imaginations should be.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Since I’m not a DJ and am only a music producer/songwriter there’snot much chance of a ‘live’ performance happening right away. That could change however under the right circumstances.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Usually I’ll have something stuck in my head for a few days before I start to arrange it in my homestudio. Once in a while I’ll just start monkeying with beats and see what happens. Sometimes there’s just no rhyme or reason for what I do, it just ends up a certain way. I like drama, sci-fi and horror, so I tend to create themes that might be considered ‘dark’. I’ve composed a couple of ‘happy’ songs and it just feels a bit weird for me. But it’s good to break yourself out of whatever musical box you crawl into now and then.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

I’d like to think I’ve grown mostly as a songwriter/composer and am constantly adding new elements and layers to my sound. I’m also more open minded about music than I used to be. I used to be somewhat of a purist and everything had to be in it’s right place. But that gets boring after a while and leaves no room for growth. So I’m in a constant state of musical evolution, God willing I’ll be doing this til the day I die so I don’t ever want to get stuck as an ‘artist’.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

The biggest challenge for me right now is combining genres in ways that people will accept and listen to. I just finished an electrohop track for an upcoming release and some people can’t get over that it’s not pure hiphop, as in old school. I don’t want to repeat what thousands before me have done, or why even bother right? So I’m working on that.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

There are a few covers I’d like to do but I’d like to keep that a surprise for now. Some of them could be terrible if not done just right. I think we all have a special place in our hearts for a good cover song that is done well. I would really want to make it my own, you know?

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Most likely working on my craft and putting out more album releases. Hopefully to a larger audience by then. LOL.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

That’s a hard question, since there are so many influential people that have shaped me into what I am. I’d love to record with Jim Morrison of The Doors, but since he’s no longer living…

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Starting August 1st, I’ll be putting out a new single each month until the end of the year, then we’ll probably put them out in some sort of e.p. or album depending on how much material I have. I’m also putting together a remix contest and the top 5 remixes will be featured in an upcoming release on VOD Recordings, which is the label I’m currently on.

Web Links: digdugdisaster.com

Facebook: facebook.com/DouglasGarnett

Twitter: twitter.com/DiGDuGDiSaSTeR

VOD Recordings: vodrecordings.net

Link to buy Robot Arms e.p.: 

‘Kojak’ FREE single here: 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Front page Interviews Music 0 Comment

DozenQ – Mr.Tac a.k.a. Chocolate

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Mr.Tac a.k.a. ‘Chocolate’ is an independent underground rapper from The Bronx, N.Y.C. who found worldwide indie success in 1999 with his summertime single ‘Up Next’. Born on June 4, 1979, in The Bronx, New York, he made his full-length album debut with the independent release ‘A Day In Da Life Ex-Perience’ (2007). He subsequently established his own label Zone Platinum Entertainment to release his music and also created a platform for artists like his-self to established their own sound. He has worked hard to build a strong audience and following for himself via MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. In 2006, an appearance on ‘Drop-Zone’ The Purple Album MixTape Chapter A Volume 2 became an early sign that the rapper was aligning himself to be recognized and heard. We caught up with him to talk about his music.

01 How did you get started in music?

I started to really do music in about 1993, when hip-hop was ‘Real’ and exciting, but I was also influenced by old school artists like Prince, Michael Jackson and Earth, Wind & Fire.

02 Where did your direction come from?

From listening to underground hip-hop artists like Wu Tang Clan, KRS One, Peter Gunz & Lord Tariq, Jay-Z, Notorious B.I.G., Nas and Big Pun.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

My major influences are Heavy D, Jodeci, L.L. Cool J, Afrika Bambaataa, Luther Vandross & The Jackson 5 and truthfully I despise artists such as Lil Wayne, Drake & Nikki Minaj.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I have also been ahead of the competition which made and still make’s creative music with its own lane – sorta something different but still familiar.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

I really give an energetic show, so if someone has never been to one, when they do they will expect a full cast show with dancer’s, live band and DJ!

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I mostly deal with any topic I feel need’s to be talk’d about, no matter if its partying, struggling, politics, love & street knowledge.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

My music has came a long way from when I first got started! Right now my current level of experience is at it’s highest level, which I guess make’s my sound today, even more powerful.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

My biggest challenge was trying to create music and make a living at the same time. Music is my heart, but I do have a family to take care of, so I have learned how to level both things, so my time is giving to make good music and profit from it and enjoy spending time with my family.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I don’t really do cover’s, but if I was to I would cover anything it would be the entire Jay-Z’s ‘Blue Print’ Album.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

On Tour over sea’s, selling out arenas and performing at the Grammy’s!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Justin Timberlake, Jay-Z, Kanye West, Timbaland and Pharrell Williams.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

My 12th solo studio album, ‘The Last Hip-Hop Avenger’ CD/DVD combo and the short film of the same name.

Web Links:

mrtacakachocolate.com
facebook.com/mrtacakachocolate
twitter.com/mrtacaka
myspace.com/mrtacakachocolate

Link to buy the current single:

Destination Album Part 1: itunes.apple.com/us/album/final-destination-album

The Final Destination Album Part 2: itunes.apple.com/us/album/final-destination-album

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Album Reviews – August 2012 by Colin Bryce

Have Mercy! The Songs of Don Covay (Ace)

I had no idea Don Covay had written or co-written so many of the tracks included here. Who knew! “Chain of Fools” the massive Aretha Franklin smash? Yep, a Covay tune. “Long Tall Shorty”? Get out of here. Yep, a Covay co-write. Brook Benton’s top 20 R&B hit “Shoes”? A Covay-Soule co-write.

The classics “See Saw” and “Mercy Mercy” are probably were the most familiar to me but I have to say the majority were a real surprise. Not everything is chart topping stuff. I could certainly live without “Mr. Twister” (a Connie Francis take), “Kangaroo Hop” (Dee Clark) and Lena Horne’s “Love Bug” is certainly less than wowsville – especially the cheesy back-ups – but all in all this is a very impressive collection of Don Covay’s writing skills. Artists featured include the likes of the aforementioned Aretha Franklin, Gene Vincent, Wanda Jackson, Solomon Burke, Wilson Pickett, the Wailers, Jerry Butler, Graham Bond Organization, Billy Fury and many more. (26 tracks.)

The Wheels: Road Block (Big Beat/Ace)

Belfast R&B ravers the Wheels get the full Big Beat treatment here and I’m sure a great number of 60s enthusiasts are rubbin’ their grubby little paws in anticipation of adding this to their collection. Liner notes come courtesy Shindig’s “Mojo” Mills and he does a great job tracing the bands permutations, affiliations, trials and tribulations.

Musically the band’s sound is probably closer to the guttural harp-driven R&B snarl of what is known as garage on the North American side of the pond as opposed to the mod/freakbeat side of things where the saturated, compressed sound of an overdriven AC30 and a Hammond drives the machine.

Similarities to Them’s sound is no surprise but one could also compare them to the Pretties, Animals or Rolling Stones at their spunkiest. No big surprises but a nice collection of sides for 60s heads. (12 tracks.)

King New Breed R&B Volume 2 (Kent/Ace)

Another great edition of King label rhythm and blues dance favourites. In total now this is number four in the “New Breed” focused compilations that Ace Records has delivered to the people.

New Breed R&B is basically proto/early soul-styled rhythm and blues that is neither overly complicated but is typically not too raw or basic either. Add in a hint of street-corner vocal group, some early black rock and roll and blues and voila – perfect club music.

This volume contains a few well-known tracks in Freddy King’s “I’m Tore Down”, Johnny “Guitar” Watson’s “Gangster of Love” and Little Willie John’s immortal take of Titus Turner’s “All Around the World”. These cuts may be familiar to many but they still remain stone classics these ears never tire of hearing.  The die-hard will be well-acquainted with Lee “Shot” Williams, Guitar Crusher, Eddie Kirk (Kirkland) and Donnie Elbert (“Wild Child” appears here) but for those who aren’t I can assure worthy musical introductions that should lead to further searches for their work on other labels and further on into their careers.

Freddy King’s sometime vocal foil and star in her own right Lula Reed is here with “Say Hey Pretty Baby” as is horn man Herb Hardesty whose great works Ace Records has recently released as The Domino Effect which features his work for Wing and Federal.

I’m always happy to have the mighty “5” Royales near the deck and they show here with the hip tempo-shifting “It Hurts Inside” (also found on Ace’s It’s Hard But It’s Fair collection from 2005). “5” Royales influential guitarist Lowman Pauling released some recordings for Memphis’ House of Blues label as El Pauling & The Royalton and Ace has chosen to include the moody, atmospheric “I’m a Cool Teenager” from those sessions here. An alternate version can be found on the “5” Royales Catch That Teardrop (released by Ace in 2007) that features the best of their House of Blues label sessions that is a must for fans of the Royales (and Lowman Paulings) work.

A couple of the nice surprises here for me are the Five Fabulous Demons latin-flavoured doo-woppin’ bopper “You Better Come Home” and Hal Hardy’s “Love Man” which wouldn’t be out of place re-done as a new Southern Soul sasser. Another ace from Ace. (24 tracks)

The Spinners: Truly Yours (Kent/Ace)

The Spinners (aka Detroit Spinners) superstar status may not have been achieved while signed to the Motown label – that would come in epic proportions in the 1970s while signed to Atlantic – but the Spinners certainly recorded a number of incredible pieces of music while at Motown. Unfortunately for the Spinners Motown’s stable was loaded with superstars and so Spinners recordings were often passed over for promotion and release in favour of others who had previous chart success.  Why in the world “Sweet Thing” and “Truly Yours” were not #1, or at least top five, pop hits is beyond me. Certainly everything here is not of the quality of those two tunes but much of the material from this collection, their first Motown album with fourteen bonus tracks, is certainly of a quality equal – or even better – than some Supremes, Miracles or Vandellas from the same period.

I will always have a spot in my heart, and in my record collection, for the Spinners and thanks to Ace I have another top release to file alongside the other great Spinners sides I currently cherish. (26 tracks.)

The Radiators from Space: Sound City Beat (625/Chiswick)

The truly legendary Irish punk band Radiators From Space deliver a very special album here with their versions of the Irish beat/rock sounds circa 1964-1971 that influenced and inspired them as both musicians and people.  There are genuinely unique, clever and fantastic versions of songs by seminal Irish groups like Taste, Them, Horslips and Thin Lizzy, as well as collector fave bands like Eire Apparent (Henry McCullough guesting on guitar), Andwella, Orange Machine, Skid Row and Ian Whitcomb. Throw in some obscurities like the King Bees and Hootenannys and you have a complete winner of a record – and it still sounds like the Radiators which is a complete bonus.

Chief Radiator Philip Chevron has penned the CD’s liner notes and it reads as a passionate tribute to the music, musicians and magical/mystical energy of a time and place that was as inspirational and important as the punk era was too many of us and to which the Radiators themselves belonged. If I was going to do an album like this you can bet your life the music of the Radiators From Space would be featured front and center.  Great job fellows! (18 tracks.)

Colin -Mohair Sweets- Bryce

One of Canada’s late 70’s “punk” rock crowd and from 1997 to 2007 the fellow behind Mohair Sweets print and webzine. Currently passes the time by playing the odd gig or two, shaking his head, wringing his hands and pondering whether or not the tape vaults of the legendary Pirates are really exhausted.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Beats Features Front page Music Reviews Rock Soul Tags:, , , , , ,
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