Is Bliss speak to Eyeplug

Is Bliss comprise of Jimmy Stuart (Guitar/Voice), Dean Edwards (Bass) and Sam Speakman (Drums) and are based in Portsmouth. Gaining critical acclaim due to their original sound, 6music airplays and incendiary live performances on the increasingly growing new psychedelic gig circuit, they are a band to look out for. After successful support slots with both Mark Gardener (Ride) & Robin Guthrie (Cocteau Twins), the band soon head out to do a support slot for The Jesus And Mary Chain on their current tour. Signed to Club AC30 with an imminent new E.P. recorded, Dean had a chat with Eyeplugs Dave Taylor who wanted to find out some more.

01. How did the band originate?

We started the band out of boredom I guess. Myself and Jimmy had been rehearsing songs now and then in his bedroom and when we felt we had something cool going on we decided that it would be best to look for a drummer. Sam was an old friend of Jimmy’s who had recently moved back to Portsmouth. Jimmy suggested we ask him to drum for us and from the first time we rehearsed as a 3-piece it felt right and we knew we were on to a winner with Sam.

02. How did you decide on your name?

The name ‘Is Bliss’ was a suggestion from a friend of the band who used to jam with me and Jimmy some while back before Sam joined. It seemed fitting and we stuck with it.

03. Who influences your sound?

We have always been fascinated by in our opinion, the two best eras for guitar bands, the 60s and the 90s. Both eras influence us heavily in the way we dress, think, write, play music and live. In terms of bands that made us want to start playing then we owe that to the likes of The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Thirteenth Floor Elevators, Jefferson Airplane, Spacemen 3, The Verve, Radiohead and The Brian Jonestown Massacre etc…

04. What are you currently listening to?

Right now, we are listening to White Fence, The Smoking Trees, The Spyrals, The Lucid Dream, Tinariwen and Dead Rabbits. Really, anything psychedelic and fuzzy is what we love!

05. How has the band evolved since it’s initial concept?

I feel we have evolved in every aspect of being a band really, We’ve learnt what common ground and also what differences we have and how to use that to create something we all are happy with. This is the case in every song, we all have to be into it 100%, otherwise it doesn’t work for us. We’ve evolved as friends too and grown closer as a unit. We know each others next move in the rehearsal room as well as on stage.

06. Your last release, the Velvet Dreams E.P. was Lauren Lavern’s Record of the Day on 6 Music and the first pressing completely sold out. Surely, you must be pleased with that?

For sure we were absolutely made up when we heard both of those! To be played on 6music is something we always wanted to achieve and so when we did this on our first attempt we felt a sense of pure excitement really, and to then go on to find out the E.P. completely sold out and went into the official charts, well that’s something I think we are still getting our heads around even now. We are incredibly proud of that and couldn’t thank everybody who bought a copy enough!  

07. You’ve personally been selected by The Jesus And Mary Chain to open for them at the O2 Bournemouth on their current tour.  Are you looking forward to playing your biggest venue to date?

Yes, of course, we are absolutely buzzing to get up onto that stage and show the crowd in Bournemouth what we are about. Let’s hope we can get them warmed up enough before the sonic destruction that follows!

08. Where else can we see you play live in the near future?

We have a large selection of dates to follow this year, Festivals in the summer and of course Liverpool Psych Fest in September. Here’s how our April 2017 is looking:

01: Bournemouth – O2 Academy
07: London – Sebright Arms 
12: Brighton – Hope & Ruin
14: Paris – Espace B
16: Bristol – Crofters Rights
22: Southsea – Castle Road, Record Store Day Event

09. You promote your own Psych Fest in Portsmouth. Tell us more.

We run a night once a year called “Southsea Psych Out”. It’s just a chance for us to bring some of our favourite unsigned psych and shoegaze bands down to Pompey to tear the roof of a sweatbox of a venue. We started it last year and the night sold out which was great! We return this year in August.

10. If you were to record a cover version, what song?

I think we’ve always tried to concentrate on our own material but if the opportunity to play a cover ever did arise we always liked the idea of toying with a dance tune and making it our own. We wouldn’t want to do the obvious you know. Set ourselves a challenge with an acid house tune maybe.

11. You’ve recently been in the studio to record your next release. When can we expect to hear it and what formats will it be released on?

Yes, we’ve just finished in the studio with Patrick Collier (Vibrators, Primal Scream, New Model Army) and we have recorded a 5 track E.P that we are really pleased with. It will be released via Club AC30 in late May on 12″ coloured vinyl and digital download.

12. If people want to find out more how can they keep in touch with the band?

We have a facebook page: facebook.com/isblissband, Our label can be found: at facebook.com/clubac30 , You can also check us out on Spotify: spotify.com

Main Photo Credit: Jessica Mailey

Dave Showplug Taylor

Dave Showplug Taylor is owner of Showplug Promotions, a man who makes things happen, loves providing great affordable quality Events, Gigs, Shows, Comedy Plugs and great all around Entertainment. Works closely alongside Eyeplug Media and lives by the Sea with his Family. Loves the MC5 and Cold Beer.

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Author – Pete McKenna

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series Old Dog Books

01. How did you get started in the world of words?

In the winter of 1995 I was laid off work on the Brighton station job 3 days before Xmas. Talk about a depressing time for me. Back at the flat I found my old Casino diaries and then the idea hit me to write Nightshift. Sold two of my best saxophones and bought a word processor. Stocked up the grub cupboard with beans and pot noodles and got down to writing the book. Finished the book in 3 weeks and started sending it out to publishers and agents. Over 40 no’s later, ST PUBLISHING gave me an offer to publish and Nightshift came out in 1996. Job done. Well received all round, the book quickly became a cult classic.

02. Has it been a struggle getting your first book published?

Nightshift wasn’t exactly a struggle. Once I’d decided to write the book it was just a matter of getting it done. The rejection was tough to take but one thing a writer has to do is shake off rejections because they are all part of the game.

03. Where did you see the first piece you had written in print, how did that feel?

Talk about a buzz when I saw the book actually in print. Yeah there’s nothing like the smell of fresh paper in the morning. Top buzz.

04. What was the main reasons that you started to write seriously?

I felt I had something to say about the 70’s northern soul scene that hadn’t been said before warts and all. The beauty of Nightshift is that it tells the whole truth and nothing but about England’s longest surviving dance culture that’s bigger than ever these days.

05. What’s a typical working day like when you are writing?

I do have a daily system which entails me getting up early, boiling up a pot of Lavazza and getting stuck into 2 to 3000 words a day depending on mood. I write everything in longhand and then when it feels good. I blitz the computer adding and subtracting where needed.

06. What were your teenage experiences that helped to shape your later mindset?

My teenage experiences shaped everything. The clobber, scooters, good mates, northern soul, drugs and soccer agro. A non – stop riotous roller coaster. Thanks also to my old man, former detective sergeant John McKenna who knew a thing or three about personal style and attention to detail which has rubbed off on me even to this day.

07. What was it like to be young and involved in Street Cultures, what were your pointers and outlook?

Hedonistic, exciting, dangerous, diverse, you name it and it was on the menu apart from anal sex of course. The sole reason for breathing was going against the social grain and it felt electric convincing me that it was all going to last forever. Oohhh err!

08. What was that period like for you as a young man outside of the Music world?

Unbeatable, unbelievable, unrepeatable, when we were young sharp hard and cool and the impossible was anything but. Great days and nights with me to the grave.

09. How did the Media distort what was going on with youth culture at that time?

The 70’s was a diverse mental decade. The buzz of football aggro was everywhere, massed Saturday battles on terraces and in town centres as opposed to the more underground streamlined casual firms of the 80’s and beyond. Same attitude with a different uniform. The media slagged Wigan off big time describing it as a drug fuelled den of iniquity frequented by vampire like young kids off their heads on drugs. And then Granada television set the scene straight with the best documentary on Wigan ever made thanks to the drive of the late great Ray Gosling RIP. Brilliant documentary that still holds its own today.

10. What music, films and books helped you to the pathway of all things alternative?

Jazz, soul,  Bowie, Ferry, reggae, ska, the king of 70’s pulp fiction Richard Allen AKA James Moffatt, Jack Kerouac, Aldous Huxley, Anthony Burgess, Christopher Isherwood Hunter S Thompson, Clockwork Orange, Lord Of The Flies, Quadrophenia, If, Alfie, The Ipcress File, Bond, The Servant, The Night Porter, Easy Rider, Apocalypse Now, Godfather, GOD the list could go on forever.

11. What other books do you wish you had written?

I don’t but to be honest. Football Factory comes close. The best insight into the murky violent world of the soccer casuals penned by a man who to me is England’s finest. John King, top bloke, top writer and a vegetarian as well. Maybe I should think about knocking meat on the head.

12. How has the internet changed what you do?

Ease of information with a worldwide audience at the touch of a button. A brilliant useful tool for research and getting the word out there in seconds. Couldn’t do without now.

13. Do you have any advice for wannabe authors?

Yeah. Forget it. Take comfort in your day job, live well, be happy, get married, buy a house and a car, have kids and grow fat, bald, toothless slowly and die happy convinced you did your best for those you love and care for. However if you do decide to march down one of the loneliest paths imaginable then write about something you know that will appeal to your readership and I’m not talking about Knitting Jumpers From Pubic Hair and be prepared for rejection after rejection until – and this is only a slim chance – you finally get your work accepted after which the really hard graft begins.

14. What projects are you planning for the future and please feel free to plug your latest book?

Currently working on two novels – UP NORTH and AUTUMN LEAVES that will complete the Frank Wilson trilogy. Also my long overdue baby JERUSALEM which is a dark violent wade through contemporary England’s slashed and torn social fabric seen through the eyes of the main character Johnny Hodges a lifelong skinhead who goes out in a blaze of glory for reasons that will become apparent. ‘ Police confirmed that they received a telephone call seconds before the triple suicide bomb attacks in London Leeds and Birmingham from one of the three men who carried out the bombings dressed in burkas claiming that they were members of the ultra – right group Patriots Of The Cross and the attacks were reprisals for the beheading of three young men in a secret London location by Jihadis with more attacks on the way.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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DozenQ – The Orders

This entry is part 18 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

The Orders are a power trio from the Isle of Wight with influences from Indie and Psychedelic Rock. The band consist of Kyle Chapman – (singer, guitarist), Isaac Snow – (bassist, backing singer) and Joe Rowe – (drummer). These three youngsters, hit you hard with twisted sounds that could be shot through a silent gun making a very big impact indeed. Eyeplug recently caught up with them after their super slot on the mainstage at the Isle of Wight Festival.

01 How did you get started?

We started the band up in high school 2013 April through me knowing our bassist Isaac through middle school and then meeting Joe our drummer in high school. Me and Isaac had been mates since middle school and had always played guitar together, after about a year into high school I was itching to start a band and then something came together with a few high school mates including Joe it didn’t work out with the others but I brought Isaac into the band to play Bass guitar and together we formed our trio. We heard there was an Isle of Wight Festival daytime slot available for musicians and bands from our high school and we got a half hour set of 60s and punk covers and played a small stage at the festival which was our first gig of 2013.

02 Where did your name come from, being based on the IOW how does that influence things?

The name ‘The Orders’ came about from suggesting loads of band names I suggested ‘the standing orders’ after a pub in Southampton and that got turned down but after a while of deciding we went with ‘The Orders’, being IOW based is difficult because it’s a small community for musicians, we’re stuck on an island and occasionally we visit the mainland but we will always have to return to the island thatis our home.

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Lots of musicians influence us, I look up to bands that are interesting musically and live like the Fat White Family a new underground band, there music is very creative but very raw and dirty sounding. Iv seen them live 3 times and there shows are always mental. Also the more obvious bands of today like the Libertines and Tame Impala inspire us musically too. I hate the corporate side of things in music, always over polished, always done by the book. Those sort of artists get it easy, they have songwriters to write their songs but they get all the credit, the songwriting is the most important thing in music but they get to sing other people’s songs and earn millions. Simon Cowell and all his merry men are tossers, there’s no excitement in that.

04 What drives you to make music?

People drive us to make music, we do it to be entertaining and show everyone what we’re about. We’re not a boring band, so to go out and play live and see people enjoying themselves is great and making music that people actually want to listen to is what makes it all worthwhile. Our fan base is still growing.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live show?

Loads of energy, harmonies, shouting, loudness and sweat.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I write all the songs, usually just sitting in my room on my acoustic guitar I then bring them to rehearsal and the pieces of the puzzle all come together. The songs are usually about everyday life, being a slave to society, finding things to get away from it or sometimes just random made up scenarios that paint a picture. All my songs always have a hidden meaning within, you have to look closer into wisdom.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Our music has evolved loads since we first started, when we started playing original music the songs were very straight forward, upbeat and Punky, they weren’t Punk songs but they had that Punk energy. Our music evolved over time and my songwriting had a big influence in that, it started to evolve into a more progressive sound with the use of guitar effects and improvisation. We got told that our music had some psychedelic influences creeping in and I liked the idea of that and started writing songs that had a bit more of a psychedelic influence, that isn’t the case with all our songs, but now a lot of our best tunes have a nice psychedelic twang to them. We’re now an Indie Psych band I would say rather than the Punk/Garage band that we started out like.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Rehearsing was a big problem for a while, there was arguments over it because I wanted to rehearse and the others wouldn’t or couldn’t and it was annoying me because I wanted to play new songs and get tighter as a band. Getting a space to rehearse was the other problem because of where all the gear was and we kept getting kicked out of churches and everything was just getting to complicated. Eventually Steve, a very good friend and helper to the band sorted us a rehearsal spot in a night-club venue, which meant we could leave our gear there and rehearse there a couple of times a week. Sorted. 

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We do sometimes play covers, but only in pub sets or sets where we are playing to people who are already pissed and just want to hear the same old covers. If there was any song we could cover I’d go with ‘the Inception’ theme tune, with a full orchestra and everything.

10 Where do you envisage being in five years time?

I think in 5 years time, we will be eating out of bins and begging for spare change. But I do hope we’re headlining Post Fest. *(That’s a slightly smaller IOW festival by the way).

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Would love to record with Kevin Parker, he created Tame Impala, he’s a genius, he could make us sound like the universe sitting inside a sea shell.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

You should be expecting The Orders to be making a big impact. More records, more gigs, more orders. You can buy a copy of our signle via the link below!

 

Web Links

facebook.com/theorders
soundcloud.com/the_orders
Instagram – @the_orders
Twitter – @the_ordersuk

Buy record here – paypal.me/TheOrders £8.50 including p&p

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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Author – Paul Hallam Part 2

This entry is part 7 of 9 in the series Old Dog Books

01. Tell us about Sleeping Dogs Books an offshoot of Old Dog Books?

Old Dog is focussed on Pulp Fiction. I don’t want it to deviate from that and become just another book imprint. But Garry Bushell had this great idea of putting out 2 books with me. So I thought let’s do something as a sideline and call it Sleeping Dogs (that name was actually invented by Danny Decourtelle).

02. What about Streetsounds, whats the set up and who is involved?

About four years ago The Bushell said the music press needs a new title. Something that is about what we did then but also about what is going on right now. A voice for the bands who can’t get in NME or Mojo. And that’s how it started. I went along with him thinking this will last 2 issues at best. 4 Years on and we are the biggest selling music magazine in the UK. We got some great writers who do it all for love not money.

03. What type of stuff do you cover within Streetsounds?

It’s mainly all the old stuff that Mojo may not want to talk about – so lots of Oi!, Punk, Mod bands etc, but also we are also covering current stuff. Plus all the specialist festivals – Punk Rock Bowling, Skamouth etc, that are getting thousands of people though the doors so to speak, but will never make the pages of the mags on the shelves of WH Smiths.

04. Tell us about you latest offering for Sleeping Dog Books?

20 Shades is a compilation of short stories written by regular Street Sounds Contributors. We have Left-Wing poet Tim Wells, Football Factory author John King, the legend that is Mr Bushell himself, Old Dogs author Craig Brackenridge and Joe Pasquale amongst others. A real mix as they say!

05. What is peoples re-action to the Streetsounds growth and spread?

It still amazes me. Street Sounds is a chaotic affair – down to me, not GB. And if we are a few weeks late with the quarterly issue people get on the case wanting to know where it is. It is a real labour of love and we need help from our readers. We need people to be helping us getting it into independent shops around the country. We have a piece on this next issue.

06. How can folks get a copy of Streetsounds?

streetsoundsonline.co.uk and also in good record shops up and down the country. You can even find us on Social Media too!

07. Do you have more follow ups planned for the ‘20 Shades of Psycho’ format?

Not yet. We really want to do a book based on Garrys’ heavy metal articles from Sounds this year. Like the 2-tone one and the Mod Revival one. That will go on Sleeping Dogs.

08. How about your own Book that you recently released, how is that doing?

It’s basically a book of my old mod photographs. It’s quite insane really. I was 16-20 years old and took my old Olympus Trip to mod clubs. 30 plus years on I’m being told this is History. You can buy it HERE! Later this month I’m doing a thing at the Photographers Gallery in Soho. People like David Bailey do that – not me…

09. How will England do in Euro 2016 in France?

Quarter Finals. I’m a North Korea fan and as they aren’t allowed to enter the Euros I’m not too excited.

10. Where can folks grab a copy of the ‘2O Shades of Psycho’ Anthology?

From the excellent Old Dog Books Website and The Pip! Pip! Amazon page.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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Author – Craig Brackenridge Part 2

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Old Dog Books

Scottish writer Craig Brackenridge has been writing about movie sleaze and demented Rock ‘n’ Roll since 1995 and has written for the magazines Street Sounds, Total Film, Bite Me, Best For Music, Dog Eat Robot and Mad Music For Bad People along with a number of album sleevnotes for Cherry Red Records.

His first book ‘Let’s Wreck’ was a part-biographical look at the Psychobilly scene from the early 1980’s to the 2000’s. In a bid to continue to record the history of Psychobilly for posterity he launched ‘Vinyl Dementia: The Psychobilly & Trash Record Guide’ in 2004. ‘Hell’s Bent On Rockin’: A History of Psychobilly’ followed in 2005 and was an attempt to chronicle the entire Psychobilly genre for Cherry Red Books. After the mammoth task of ‘Hell’s Bent…’ Craig decided to move into fiction as he has been a long-time fan of exploitative pulp paperbacks from the 1970’s. Short snappy novels filled with bikers, skinheads, teddy boys, boot boys, youth gangs, randy window cleaners, sexually frustrated housewives and ruthless characters from the old west are what he enjoys the most and his books ‘Psychobilly’ (Old Dog Books), ‘Glory Boys’ (Caffeine Nights Publishing) and the blood-spattered Western ‘Apache Gold’ (Stormscreen Productions) are his contributions to the genre he loves.

01. Tell us about you latest offering for Old Dog Books?

‘Rave On Scooterboy’ is about Terry, a young scooterist in North London, 1988. He’s a committed scooterist but also curious about other underground scenes. Along with his workmate Stevie, he gets immersed in the growing rave scene and it starts to take over his life fairly quickly. Things move into overdrive when they start to promote their own illegal raves but along with the money, drugs and easy sex that come their way there is also trouble in the form of local hoodlum Ricky ‘Dodgy’ Harris. As things descend into chaos and bloodshed Terry realises that the only people that can help him are the ones he has let down the most.

02. What was the Scootering Scene like in the 80s?

There were far more committed scooterists than me about but from 1987-1991 it totally took over my life. It was one long blur of two-stroke engine fumes, pilot jackets with patches, army trousers with beer towels, great music, booze and bunk-ups (occasionally!!). The most amazing part was leaving your home town behind whenever possible and going to places where there were (literally) thousands of people that shared similar interests. The experience of keeping the same pants, trousers and boots on for three days straight was also unforgettable.

03. What began the change towards folks seeking new things like the Acid House Scene?

I think the attraction of being part of some underground scene must have attracted a lot of people who had not previously been part of any subculture. Mainstream clubs in the late 1980’s were mostly fucking awful – shirt, slacks, no trainers, no entry with a funny haircut, girls dancing round their handbags to Stock Aitken & Waterman then all out for a fight outside the kebab shop at closing time. Raving all night in a loved-up atmosphere must have seemed like nirvana to a lot of people.

04. What about new drugs like MDMA and ‘E’ becoming available to more and more people?

I’m not sure if the drug was created to enhance the music or the music enhanced the drug but it’s fair to say they both came together at exactly the right time. People that would quite happily knock lumps out of each other if they were on cheap speed or pissed up seemed to be happy to congregate with a ‘dove’ down their neck.

05. How did people react to the vastly different music on offer at the Rave type events?

I’m sure the drugs must have played a large part. If you were ‘on one’, as youths of that time used to say, it was almost like an epiphany and the music, the lights and the whole experience made sense. If you weren’t then it probably seemed like a sweaty hell-hole in a disused building with someone’s car alarm going of at ear-splitting volume. I don’t think there was any grey area with the music – you either got it with a semi-religious fervour or thought it was shit.

06. Was the ‘Rave Culture’ partly responsible for the end of tribalism in Youth Cultures?

I honestly don’t know what happened but it did seem to ‘blend-in’ a wide range of punters. I’m sure there are still hardcore ravers out there somewhere but I suspect that any Mods, Punks or Scooterists that drifted on to the acid house scene have long since drifted back to their original style. I think the warehouse rave scene got so much national publicity that many people just got involved out of curiosity and then got kind of swept along by it for a few years. There’s no doubt that things did change around then. Before 1988, subcultures were fairly insular and there was not much crossover but I’m not sure if rave was totally to blame. It could have been grunge, the internet… I don’t know? Thatcher?

07. What was it like to ‘mobile’ on a Scooter in huge numbers and take over Seaside Towns?

It always amazed me the buzz that emanated from the big coastal runs. You started of with a few mates from your town, met a bundle more in the city then the numbers slowly grew with every mile that you got closer to your destination until all you could see were scooters. The first time I went to Scarborough, in 1987, I was shocked by the numbers that were there, it felt like scooterists had taken over the town completely.

08. What types of bands were popular with 80s Scooterists?

So many styles of music were part of the scene and that’s what attracted me to it in the first place. The majority of the events I attended were from the Midlands up and my booze-soaked memories certainly recall Northern Soul, Motown, Ska, 60’s Garage, Psychobilly, Punk, revival Mod and even some Glam Rock. Psychobilly bands that played quite a big role at runs, scooter do’s etc. were The Meteors, King Kurt, The Coffin Nails and The Highliners and no matter where you were someone was always playing Al Wilson’s ‘The Snake’ and Billy Ocean’s ‘Red Light Spells Danger’.

09. How does ‘Rave on Scooterboy’ compare with ‘Psychobilly’ your other ODB title?

‘Rave On Scooterboy’ is a real step forward for me, with a lot of research behind it to build up the story. ‘Psychobilly’ was basically autobiographical with names and places changed to protect the guilty. Generally though, I strongly believe that the experience of belonging to a street culture, or movement if you like, is a pretty shared experience. That feeling of being part of something is an unbeatable feeling, so this book should have a pretty wide appeal. If you were there you can remember the feeling, if you were not you might wish you were.

10. Where can folks grab a copy of ‘Rave on Scooterboy’?

Straight from the folks who are putting the boot back on the bookshelf with modern pulp fiction – www.olddogbooks.net

 

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admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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