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DozenQ – The Sherpas

This entry is part 1 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

From Exeter (UK). The Sherpas has been generating a local and national buzz making quite a name for themselves. They are young musicians and stunning live performers, they flip from memorable indie rock to pure passion. Now Soirée sees them racing to ever greater heights. Wave To The Water taken from forthcoming EP Soirée out 27th June. James Fuke – Drummer & Pierre Roxon – Lead singer talk to eyeplug.net

01 How did you get started in music?

Pierre: I started as a guitarist because my Mum and Dad both play, I loved blues and used to write instrumental numbers. I never planned to be a singer or front man, things evolved and now that’s what I do.

James: As a child my Dad and I used to watch live videos of Genesis, after watching Chester Thompson and Phil Collins playing a drum duet I had to pick up the sticks.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Pierre: Well we were all doing lots of things with music before we got together but a sense of direction as a band has taken some time to form. We just started playing what felt comfortable and slowly that morphed and we found more of a personal voice as a group. (Still lots more directions to cover!)

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

James: I listen and respect a lot of drummers E.g. Benny Greb, Dennis Chambers, Virgil Donati and Vinnie colauita. I listen and try to keep an open mind to the other band member’s musical interests… We all like Jeff Buckley.

Pierre: Yeah Jeff Buckley is a massive influence as are The Maccabees. I’m inspired by lots of other art forms and have been truly hooked on Matisse’s paintings for longer than I can remember. As a band we all loath what Rihanna stands for… I’m sure she is a nice person but that whole part of the music industry NEEDS to implode.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

James: The Bands we have been listening to mostly.

Pierre: We would be stupid to say we didn’t owe a lot to our inspirations. I don’t think we really have a type of song. Each has its own personality and structure. We all like to experiment with different reverbs and delays. We recorded a set of wine glasses with water tuned to a chord which we use as a drone. We find things like that really fun to work with.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

James: The Bands on stage chemistry is the best its ever been. We still consider each one of our shows as a learning curve… The different venues and audiences we perform to adds up.

Pierre: We have drum duets between James and Chris (bass) which the crowd loves. We have sections of improvisation; I think the audience feed off those moments. It gets us going and does the same for the crowd. I like to get in and jump around with the audience.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Pierre: Anyone of the band will come up with something… and we just spend time on it, normally it sounds completely different to the initial idea by the end. For me as a songwriter, I use a lot of imagery from my childhood, I sometimes write songs as if they were letters to people I know. The subjects are normally personal… surreal or both.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Pierre: The main way it’s evolved is that we have all become much more versatile as musicians.

James: Since starting playing I’ve listened to a wider range of styles also from day one I’ve had friends and family who are also musicians who I could talk to and produce music with. Playing with other musicians in general gives you a better understanding of where you sit in the mix which is essential as a drummer.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

James: Just organisation in general really.

Pierre: Yeah as a group of people we weren’t the best when we started out, everything was up in the air we wouldn’t know where we needed to be, but we have become a lot better, thankfully we have Jake (guitar) who is the most organised, he is also one cool cucumber.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Pierre: My Sharona! Because it’s cracking that or Blue Monday but we don’t really enjoy playing covers as much.

James: We’re always trying to write new material… covers can be fun though.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

James: Hopefully touring and seeing more of the world… even if it’s peering from a van window.

Pierre: Making albums that all sound completely unique and with an amazing live show that we can play to as many people as possible.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

James: Lianne La Havas, Sting… would be nice to party with Stevie Wonder.

Pierre: I would love to do a song with Laura Marling that would be incredible.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

James: Our first EP is out on June 27th. Our first music video just came out but there will be more very soon.

Pierre: Over the next month we are playing shows in some interesting places to publicise our EP we are playing in a vintage clothes shop and a cave to name a few. In the next year we will be gigging everywhere possible in the UK.

Web Links:

facebook.com/TheSherpas
twitter.com/TheSherpasUK

Tour Dates 2013:

18th June – Hanger 142 Exeter, UK
27th June  – Mama Stones Exeter UK – EP Launch
29th June  – Rooster Records Exeter, UK
7th July  – Rock Otočec Festiva,l Slovenia
12th July – Tiverton Balloon Festiva,l UK
23rd August  – Morefest Dorset, UK

Link to buy the current single:
Telescope –  itunes.apple.com/telescope-single

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Dark DozenQ Front page Indie Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Vanity

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Vanity is an Italian based band including members from Switzerland, Palestine and Italy. Their first full lenght Occult You is an album inspired by European culture and a challenging combination of Doom, Black Metal, Indie, New Wave and Gothic with fascinating vocals and shades of electronic.

01 How did you get started in music?

F: I think we are very different person with a different education in life as in music.We came from different places and we have different ages, but I can affirm with no doubt that thanks to the rock music and it’s sub genres that we started making music. Making music will always be essential self expression for us all, that could ever be absent from ourselves.

02 Where did your direction come from?

F: Not speaking about category and genres of rock music, I think the fundamental direction for our music is a heavy, slow, psychedelic, and obscure sound.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

F: We are influenced by our years and years of listening to different music, so it’s not possible to say what are the predominant influences. But if we talk about the influences that make us able to write down the songs of our first album Occult You, I’m not afraid to mention Type O Negative, and Kate Bush. There is so much good music to listen to out there at the moment, that we have no time to despise any other bands or artists.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

F: For this album I think the sound was influenced by a very dark period we all passed through, not only musically but also personally. The songs instead are influenced from a never published novel of N (the singer) “Occult you” which became the album title.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

F: In our live act we try to recreate the sound of the album but with the emotionality of a live concert .We try to be as loud as possible not loosing the deep atmosphere of our sound.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

F: During the whole creative process of “Occult You” we had all the lyrics almost done. So we started writing the songs trying to translate in music what the lyrics were expressing.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

F: We are a pretty young band at their first album, so it’s difficult to say that our music evolved during the process of writing Occult You. We can better say that our music will evolve in the next pubblication we are going to release, or better this is what we expect to do.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

F: The biggest challenge for us as a band was to keep believing in our music when nobody outside there did. We did overcome that, after publishing our record with our label Church Independent, having a lot of good reviews of the album in Italy and also all around Europe.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

F: Yes.We usually play live Red Water, a song of Type O Negative. We also made an acoustic version of this song with piano voice and guitar, in the occasion of the 3rd anniversary of the death of Peter Steel. You can find the live video on our youtube channel.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

F: Keep on playing our music and be satisfied with that.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

F: Right now with Chelsea Wolf, we all really appreciate her as both a singer and an artist.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

F: We are working on a couple of new video for two songs from our debut album “Occult You” cause we need to express our music also with a visual interpretation.So we like to make videos for our songs. We are also working on planning our european tour for the next autumn.

Web Links:

facebook.com/VanityDoom/
twitter.com/VANITYdoom
myspace.com/vanitywaves
youtube.com/user/VANITYwaves

Tour Dates 2013:

09/06/2013   MI AMI Rock Festival, Milano, Italy

Link to buy the current single:

ITunes
Amazon

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Dark DozenQ Front page Indie Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Mr.Tac a.k.a. Chocolate

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Mr.Tac a.k.a. ‘Chocolate’ is an independent underground rapper from The Bronx, N.Y.C. who found worldwide indie success in 1999 with his summertime single ‘Up Next’. Born on June 4, 1979, in The Bronx, New York, he made his full-length album debut with the independent release ‘A Day In Da Life Ex-Perience’ (2007). He subsequently established his own label Zone Platinum Entertainment to release his music and also created a platform for artists like his-self to established their own sound. He has worked hard to build a strong audience and following for himself via MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. In 2006, an appearance on ‘Drop-Zone’ The Purple Album MixTape Chapter A Volume 2 became an early sign that the rapper was aligning himself to be recognized and heard. We caught up with him to talk about his music.

01 How did you get started in music?

I started to really do music in about 1993, when hip-hop was ‘Real’ and exciting, but I was also influenced by old school artists like Prince, Michael Jackson and Earth, Wind & Fire.

02 Where did your direction come from?

From listening to underground hip-hop artists like Wu Tang Clan, KRS One, Peter Gunz & Lord Tariq, Jay-Z, Notorious B.I.G., Nas and Big Pun.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

My major influences are Heavy D, Jodeci, L.L. Cool J, Afrika Bambaataa, Luther Vandross & The Jackson 5 and truthfully I despise artists such as Lil Wayne, Drake & Nikki Minaj.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I have also been ahead of the competition which made and still make’s creative music with its own lane – sorta something different but still familiar.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

I really give an energetic show, so if someone has never been to one, when they do they will expect a full cast show with dancer’s, live band and DJ!

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I mostly deal with any topic I feel need’s to be talk’d about, no matter if its partying, struggling, politics, love & street knowledge.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

My music has came a long way from when I first got started! Right now my current level of experience is at it’s highest level, which I guess make’s my sound today, even more powerful.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

My biggest challenge was trying to create music and make a living at the same time. Music is my heart, but I do have a family to take care of, so I have learned how to level both things, so my time is giving to make good music and profit from it and enjoy spending time with my family.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I don’t really do cover’s, but if I was to I would cover anything it would be the entire Jay-Z’s ‘Blue Print’ Album.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

On Tour over sea’s, selling out arenas and performing at the Grammy’s!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Justin Timberlake, Jay-Z, Kanye West, Timbaland and Pharrell Williams.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

My 12th solo studio album, ‘The Last Hip-Hop Avenger’ CD/DVD combo and the short film of the same name.

Web Links:

mrtacakachocolate.com
facebook.com/mrtacakachocolate
twitter.com/mrtacaka
myspace.com/mrtacakachocolate

Link to buy the current single:

Destination Album Part 1: itunes.apple.com/us/album/final-destination-album

The Final Destination Album Part 2: itunes.apple.com/us/album/final-destination-album

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Christmas In Vietnam

This entry is part 4 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Christmas In Vietnam are a power-trio from the foothills of Appalachia in Middle Tennessee, USA. CIV are able to mould and shape their varied musical influences into a very cool and unique sound.

Vocals/Guitars: Spent Wisely
Bass: Jimmy H.
Drums: Brian Douglas

01 How did you get started in music?

Spent: Unemployment, mostly. (laughs)

Jimmy: Spent taught me how to play the Bass… after I joined our first band.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Brian: Complete improvisation and really letting all of our individual ‘styles’ clash. It’s just one of those things that kind of ‘happen’ and you let it take you into your bedroom and read you a story and before you know it you’re all comfortable and there’s hot chocolate in your left hand and you’re left saying “Yeah, yeah I like ”

Jimmy: Yeah. I can really see that. Individuality and hot chocolate. CIV.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Spent: I’ll say my major influences were some of my earliest influences. I love a lot of classic rock bands like Zeppelin, Floyd, and so on.  Can’t say I despise any particular groups, but I’m not a fan of commercial rock radio these days.

Brian: The Beatles, Soundgarden, Pink Floyd… Yes, all of the music that leaves that distinct imprint on you and leaves you hungry to create something with the same influential impact that it had on you. You gotta be willing to get in a different mindset when you’re a musician as far taking criticism and dishing it out. Not everyone is going to like you, but there’s a group of people that will. That being said, ‘despise’ is a big word. Now, much like Spent, I’m not necessarily happy about where the industry has come, listening to the current ‘modern radio rock’.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Spent: Well, I love Vol. 1, but it was really like reaching in the dark trying to find out what we could come up with together.  Now, the inspiration for me comes from a place of confidence in knowing that we have a cool, unique sound that we’re trying to cultivate.

Brian: To progress. Our first take on our stuff, we literally had just gotten together and we weren’t necessarily used to the recording and writing processes. I’m not saying I don’t love what we created, because I do. It’s rad. But, right now, we’re really tight knit on everything. The stuff we’re working on blows me away because of the improvements we’ve all individually/collectively have made.

Jimmy: It seems we never have a shortage of unique and interesting ideas to develop. As long as I continue to hear that and we never get to the point of throwing something out, just to throw it out, I will remain passionate to continue.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Spent: Full. Frontal. Male. Nudity. (laughs) No… hopefully just a good time!

Brian: The nudity in itself is definitely  my favorite part. If you’re having a good time then so am I.

Jimmy: My God. (shakes head)

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Spent: Jimmy & I started writing songs for Vol. 1 on acoustic guitars in his living room.  Once Brian joined us, those songs took on a whole new life.  Since Vol. 1, we’ve been jamming a lot over different chord progressions and riffs. We record the jams & listen to them to find what we like best. As far as themes and subjects, I’d say for Vol. 1, I listened to the music and went from there.

Jimmy: You have to wait for a power failure. Heh. Sorry, inside joke.

07 How did your music evolve since you first began playing?

Spent: We’re more familiar with each other’s playing style. That makes most any group better, but I think it’s essential when you’re trying to write original music.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Brian: The only thing I can think of is time constraints. I’d love to get paid and jam with these guys 12+ hours a day, but at the moment, that’s not possible. We get together as much as possible and it sounds phenomenal when we do, out of practice and all, so we usually are able to jump right into it.

Jimmy: Time. We have so many ideas and so little time in the day to see them come to fruition.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Spent: No covers as of yet, but not opposed to them. Hocus Pocus by Focus because I would feel like “We have arrived!” if we could nail that. Ha!

Brian: Covers are always fun. I’d love to do some when we get our primary stuff out of the way. That’s where all the focus is.

Jimmy: Apache by Tommy Seebach. Listen and you’ll understand why.

10 Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Brian: Man, it’s been so long since I’ve been to Sea World. Do they even have manatees there?

Jimmy: I see myself in Reno… Most people likely end up in Reno. Not that they want to… it just happens.

Spent: 2018?

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Spent: I’m actually stoked about what we’re doing right now!

Brian: If the question was “Who would you most like to jam with?” there’d be a long list, but as far as recording… I’m pretty content with we’re doing and who I’m recording with.

Jimmy: These guys. Not the guys beside me, I have a picture of the Charles K. Band in my wallet. Those guys are amazing.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Spent: Our next step is going to be a quantum leap forward in our sound! We’ve grown as a band and as musicians, and we’re taking every step we can to write and record our best.

Jimmy: I couldn’t have said it better! The next project on the board will be amazing! I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

Web Links:

facebook.com/ChristmasInVietnam
reverbnation.com/christmasinvietnam
christmasinvietnam.bandcamp.com/
soundcloud.com/christmas-in-Vietnam

Link to buy the current single:
cdbaby.com/cd/christmasinvietnam

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Interviews Music Rock Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Sakis Gouzonis

This entry is part 5 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Sakis Gouzonis, more often referred to as Sakis, is a Greek electronic composer. He has released five studio albums over the last five years (First Contact, New Earth, The Tree Of Life, Ultimate Love and Vast Victory), winning multiple international awards for his music. Today, his international fan club consists of more than 440,000 members in 220 countries. What makes this all the more amazing is that it has all been done independently, with no record labels involved in supporting him. He is the only Greek independent artist to have reached that level of fame and success.

01. How did you get started in music?

I have been playing and composing music since I was a kid. In 1990, my parents bought me an electronic keyboard, and I immediately started playing and composing music. I can still remember myself sitting at my parents’ home spending countless hours every day composing, orchestrating, creating sounds, and playing music. After finishing Senior High School, I released two remix compilations of Christian hymns. The first one was released in 1996, and the second one in 1998. In 2000, I was asked to play keyboards in a band that was backing up Greek singer Costas Fragoraptis. We released two albums, and both of them were aired by Greek radio stations. On 8 August 2008, I released my first studio album entitled First Contact, which received a lot of radio airplay and press coverage from media outlets around the world.

 02. Where did your direction come from?

The music you listen to when you are growing up is extremely important, and for me it changed who I was and everything I wanted to be. When I first listened to the music of Jean Michel Jarre, Yanni, & Vangelis, my life took a new direction.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations, and who do you despise?

I believe that the music from the 80’s and 90’s was a major influence. I was also influenced by great electronic and cinematic composers, such as Jean Michel Jarre, Yanni, Vangelis, John Williams, James Horner, Danny Elfman, Alan Silvestri, and many others. I despise all those that spread hate around the world, instead of accepting people as they are.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

The idea of inspiration is a bit hard to comprehend. Something that one person may not even notice could be the most inspiring thing to someone else. Personally, I am inspired by so many things; planets, stars, people, nature, paintings, dreams, etc. The list could go on forever.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then and possibly even now?

He/she can expect a Greek electronic composer on stage that performs with passion and a lot of positive energy. In my live act I do my best to recreate the sound of my studio albums, but with the emotionality of a live show.

06. How do you begin your tracks? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Each one of my tracks comes in a moment of inspiration. My music is about the universe, it is about the infinite, it is about the mysterious forces that we all feel to be around us, it is about what we can and what we cannot understand. My complicated rhythms tell people something about the equally complex rhythms of their inner life.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

That’s a great question. Well, my melodies have become more emotional, and my orchestrations and chord structures have become more complex. In addition, music technology has improved vastly since I started recording, as has my access to that technology. My music tracks just keep getting stronger and stronger.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? Have you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

My biggest challenge has always been not having enough knowledge for solving technical problems as quickly as I would like to. But I will say that I have very high standards. Being a perfectionist both in the studio and live on stage is a constant challenge for me.

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

It is very easy to fall into the trap of wanting to play other people’s music. For me, there is nothing more satisfying than playing my own original music and people responding to it in a really positive way.

10. Where do you envisage yourself being in five years’ time?

In five years’ time, I would envisage myself being in my studio recording a “greatest hits” album.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

I like to record with Vangelis or Yanni. They are both great Greek composers.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

I am currently working on my sixth studio album, which is going to be released on 13 August 2013. I am also working on planning my tour for this autumn.
So, remember to visit my official website SakisGouzonis.com for all the latest news. Thanks in advance.

Web Links:

SakisGouzonis.com
SakisGouzonis.com/music
myspace.com/sakisgouzonis
purevolume.com/sakisgouzonis
imradio.com/sakisgouzonis

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Instruments Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Gordon Duthie

This entry is part 6 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Gordon Duthie is a music artist from Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Duthie’s musical style would probably be classed as “alternative” but he prefers to not abide by the standard musical genres and his musical ideas come from a huge variety of inspirations and sounds. Duthie’s driven and ambitious personality is evident and he is always looking to improve the quality, breadth and production of his work.

01 How did you get started in music?

I’m 26 years old and I can’t really remember not having music as a significant part of my life.  I started playing instruments properly at a young age – during primary school years – and I think I bought my first recording software program when I was in my mid teens. I started recording my debut album – “Shire and City” – in 2008 and it was released in 2012. It was a challenging time as I had to prioritise my education throughout those years, so it was a great feeling to finally get it out in the public domain.

02 Where did your direction come from?

“Shire and City” is an alternative album with a diverse range of styles and this reflects my taste in music. My upcoming project “Multimedia Monster” has some similarities to “Shire and City” but it is generally heavier and the production quality has improved significantly.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I will listen to anything really, although I don’t listen to music that I see as a marketing rather than artistic project. If I was to highlight some major influences I would say solo music artists who do things a bit different from the norm like Beck, Eels and Ryan Adams. I don’t think it’s beneficial naming anyone I don’t listen to because I guess they are doing their own thing and just because I don’t like what they do doesn’t mean I should despise them. It’s impossible for any song to be liked by everyone, we’re all different and that’s a good thing.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I try to make all of my songs sound reasonably different, but somehow tie together into a coherent album. I’ve always been into music that pushes the boundaries and challenges the status quo.  One of the themes of my upcoming album – “Multimedia Monster”- is a cynicism towards social media. Most music blogs / forums / websites encourage musicians to use social media constantly and basically say if you are not into it, nobody will ever take notice of your music, therefore this project could be deemed as career suicide, but it’s something which I believed was worth exploring. The last lyric on the album is “The music artist is the biggest hypocrite I know”, because I do have social media pages, I’m taking them down from the inside!

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

I haven’t done any proper live shows yet, so it’s a total mystery. I have been too busy producing music that I haven’t had time to really put together a proper show or get a band together. I have been offered quite a lot of live shows but I have rejected them all so far, I don’t think it’s something I will do unless there is a significant demand. I have done a small live web show which was just me, an acoustic guitar, a microphone, a laptop and a connection to the internet, it was fun and the people watching all seemed to enjoy it. Overall i’m more of a music artist than a performer, but you never know what might happen in the future.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I always write the lyrics before I produce any of the music. I have done it the other way round before and found it difficult to get a proper message across. The lyrics are very important to me and I would rather have a song with a cohesive lyrical theme rather than words that just fit in, rhyme with the music. Every song I do covers something different, themes range from my surroundings, technology, materialism, politics, relationships, art and so on.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

The production quality has got better as the years have gone by. It’s a long and steep learning curve and I have a lot of respect for those who are really good at music production. My sound is always evolving, I’m easily bored and would hate doing the same record over and over again.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Learning the production side, as I said it is something you really have to put the hours in to get to a reasonable level. It can be really frustrating at times but you can look back in satisfaction when it’s all done. Before I started recording “Multimedia Monster” I hired a professional mixing and mastering engineer to make sure it sounded good across different listening systems and I also visited the studio of a well respected Scottish music artist – Steve Mason – to learn how he records music professionally.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

No, I prefer to spend my time writing and producing my own songs. I did a couple of remixes a few years ago and have had some ideas to do some covers in my own style, but they have been put at the back of the production queue!

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Hopefully still being able to produce music which keeps evolving stylistically. I don’t really have any grand plan, just going where my mind will take me!  The world may have been destroyed by computers by then!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

It would be interesting to do a collaboration with someone who makes totally different music to what I do. I really liked the “Collision Course” collaboration by Linkin Park and Jay-Z, that was two contrasting styles blending well together, doing something like that would be worthwhile.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

My new album “Multimedia Monster” is being released on the 6th of August 2013. This chronicles my experiences with technology over the past 20 years, from retro gaming and land-line phones to the saturated mobile and social networking platforms of the modern age. I am from the last generation who experienced life before the internet became an integral part of western civilisation. The material across “Multimedia Monster” portrays nostalgic, reflective, acerbic, positive and humorous anecdotes of the ever changing digital world. Musically, the album is an eclectic mix of styles, but is generally heavier than my previous work. “Multimedia Monster” inputs me away from the natural world, processes me through motherboards and telecommunication masts and outputs a monstrous character addicted to electronic devices and meaningless information. The first music video from the album – “Digital Virus” – is a parody of old science fiction movies, where robots and technology were perceived as powerful enemies. This matches the theme of the song which takes a cynical look at the way social media and the internet are becoming a major part of social norms.

Web Links:

facebook.com/GordonDuthieMusic
twitter.com/GordonDuthie
myspace.com/gordonduthie

Link to buy the current single:
gordonduthie.com/music

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Sabrina

This entry is part 7 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Sabrina Murdaugh (stage name, Sabrina) is based in Nashville but is making her mark not only in Music City, but well (well!) beyond. A singer/songwriter who, to-date, has released three CDs, Sabrina has played numerous times at the famed Bluebird Café (and even gotten a standing ovation there). As I said, though, she is not only performing in Nashville. In addition to Tennessee, Sabrina has played in 17 other states: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia. PLUS, she has played at the Regal Room in London (England) (and a few other shows there too).

01 How did you get started in music?

Well, I’ve been singing all of my life in school and church but it was after I’d moved to Nashville and lived here for a few years that I started doing music. The loss of a friend made me evaluate my life and I decided that I wanted to do something that made me happy. Music was that thing so I started out by singing at a coffeehouse and then writers’ nights around town. That evolved when I met a good friend who began introducing me to some industry folks. After that didn’t work out the way I expected it to, I decided to do music as an indie and that led to the recording of my first CD.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Living in Nashville, I saw many indie artists doing what I wanted to do and that’s where I started. As I grew and continue growing, I continue to read a lot and research what others are doing not to emulate them but to get an idea of what can be done and as an impetus to go beyond in my own personal expression.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I grew up listening exclusively to a wide range of Christian and classical music so I’m sure that has influenced at the very least some of the content and maybe even the style. Artistry-wise, once I was introduced to general market music, I’ve always loved Bonnie Raitt because she’s an amazing artist and seems to say in her music and presentation, “Here I Am, take it or leave it.” It’s the fearlessness that I admire. I’m also a huge fan of Tuck & Patti. They take one guitar and one voice and strike so many chords inside the soul of the listener. I think that no matter the production or number of instruments on a finished product, if the song can’t make it as a guitar/vocal then it’s missing something essential.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I look around and see that life can be quite difficult. As an artist I try to use the gift/tool of music to lift people up, to encourage them, to give them permission to feel whatever it is they’re feeling and to look for the hope that lies beyond those emotions. Stylistically, I’m inspired by the great diversity of  wonderful music available to us now. With so many options I think it’s important to experiment and find your voice. I believe the character of the musical narrative I’m sharing dictates the voice I use.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

When I’m performing I’m going to come out and give you everything I’ve got in the execution of the music and the lyrics. One of my favorite things to hear is when a fan says, “I felt like you believed every word you sang.” That makes me feel like I really communicated and makes me very conscious of the songs I choose.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

My songs come from so many places. Sometimes it’s a melody or a phrase that has popped up in my subconscious and once it comes to the surface, I try to flesh it out. I’ll repeat it over and over in a stream of consciousness sort of way until the story whole unfolds. Once the picture starts to take shape then I color in all of the blank spaces.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

I’ve grown a bit since I first started and have been exposed to so many kinds of music now. I believe that has broadened not only my musical knowledge but also my point of view. I’m not as afraid to step out of the role as the observer and share more personal things in my music. I don’t always write about autobiographical things; but when that story needs to be told, I don’t hesitate. I’m also constantly pushing myself to explore other progressions and sounds so that neither I nor the fans are bored during the set.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

My biggest challenge has been getting over social anxiety. I’m very comfortable in front of a microphone with a guitar in hand; but sometimes outside of that realm I feel, let’s say “uncomfortable.” I worry, like many artists, that this music which is so essential to my soul might not be accepted by some. Some days I still struggle with “not fitting in” but the pull of the music is stronger than that feeling. I know that I have something to offer and that I will fail if I let anything get in the way of that offering even if it’s just for one listener.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I love playing covers, especially since I didn’t grow up listening to general market radio/music. It’s been really cool hearing and learning songs that the average person grew up with. Picking one song is extremely difficult because I have a large but diverse taste for music. I think I’d like to cover “Shape of My Heart” by Sting. It’s such an incredibly beautiful song that takes the simple activity of a card game and makes it a personal confession not only for himself but for the listener who lives and loves in this world. Additionally the guitar work is lovely.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

In five years (or sooner) I’d like to be performing on bigger and even international stages: perhaps even sharing the stage with some of my favorite musicians. I’d also like to release more projects exploring specific styles outside of my current music; like swing or bluegrass.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

As a performer, I’d love to record with Bonnie Raitt. If you’re referring to who I’d like to have as a producer I think that Jack White would challenge me and bring out something unexpected just from his musical point of view.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

I’m currently working on a new CD that I hope to release in October 2013.

Web Links:

facebook.com/sabrinasongs

twitter.com/sabrinasongs

myspace.com/justsabrina

youtube.com/anirbasrec

Tour dates: sabrinasongs.com/tourdates

Link to buy musiccdbaby.com/cd/sabrina1

Photo by David Hager

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Folk Interviews Music Rock Tags:, , ,
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DozenQ – Allman Brown

This entry is part 8 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Allman Brown is a singer songwriter from North London, his current EP Sons And Daughters will be released on 2nd September digitally through Akira Records . The title single Sons And Daughters features Liz Lawrence on vocals. Allman Brown is well known on the live music circuit, having played top venues in London, New York and Paris.

01 How did you get started in music?

I picked up a guitar when I was 19 and taught myself to play, with the help of some patient friends and guitar tabs, so I could play open mic nights down in Exeter. I moved back to London after university and have been gigging ever since. Although I don’t play Drive by Incubus so much anymore!

02 Where did your direction come from?

I was sonically and musically quite limited because I could only play guitar and was writing simple acoustic songs. So, my direction was all steel strings and vocal.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

My major influences are Bon Iver, City and Colour, Bruce Springsteen, Fink… the list goes on. As for despising, I like to think I am a live and let live kind of guy. That said, if you trapped me in a room were One Direction was playing my head might just explode.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

My inspiration for both of these is my desire to write songs that I really care about, rather than songs which sound great for a while, okay for a week and then ultimately vanish completely.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live
shows then & possibly even now?

Someone can always expect to have a good time, I like to engage with my audience rather than just get through my set staring at my shoes and looking soulful. Laughing is not against the law. Also, you can expect to see my drummer Mike’s beautiful beard.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you
deal with?

Most of them begin with a feeling that I then try to articulate. Often I would have seen something like a film, or had a memory . Thematically they deal with large emotions over impulses and I really like to blend ideas of history and the weight of the past in there.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

It has become more complicated as my guitar playing has improved and my ambitions have grown. it is still relatively simple but the Production has advanced hugely due to meeting lots of wonderful and talented people who I know have the joy of working with. Whether they are other Artists or Producers they have helped me to capture the songs that I chase around in my head and bring them to life.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you able to overcome
this? If so, how?

The biggest challenge is to do with never giving up. It can be harsh out there and difficult to keep your passion alive and to always be inspired to write. It is a daily challenge but so far I’m still standing.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to
cover most and why?

I mostly play Bon Iver covers. If I could pick any song though right now… Don’t Save Me by Haim.

10 Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Somewhere in my private jet!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Justin Vernon of Bon Iver and Rick Rubin could come in for moral support.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

At the moment I am amassing material so I’ll have two more EP’s in the bag ready to go.

Web Links:

facebook.com/AllmanBrownMusic

Tracks available from Allman Brown’s Website: www.allmanbrown.com

Tour Dates:

11th July – Live Session with Amazing Radio

12th July  – Wolf Club @ Tooting Tram & Social

12th August  – Society of the Golden Slippers

13th September  – Old St Pancras Church

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Folk Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Galilee

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

GALILEE is an electronic alter ego of  the multi-genre  allrounder musician, songwriter, producer Douglas Garnett also known as DiGDuGDisaster. ‘Robot Arms’ is the debut e.p. on VOD Recordings and contains songs recorded between 2002 and 2013.

Review of current EP – Robot Arms 

Much like popular electronic acts such as Squarepusher, Download or Amon Tobin, Douglas Garnett’s electronic project Galilee mixes equal parts innovation and accessibility, blissfully coloring outside the lines on the 2013 EP release entitled “Robot Arms”. The EP blends a series of electronic genres and each track is radically different, yet all cohesive and a necessary part of the journey.

“Hermetically Sealed” glitches and tweaks it’s way along, taking a Skinny Puppy/cevin Key influence and colliding it with some dubstep for good measure. This is hard hitting headphone music to be sure. “Robot Arms” is a driving, nose-through-the-wall listening experience perfect for frantic dancing or even deep contemplation, strange as that sounds. Garnett has the dreamer’s disease, and this bodes well for his music, which has a sense of depth beyond the choice of sound.

“Welcome To The End” continues along similar lines, while introducing Garnett’s distorted vocals and pop/indie sensibilities in support of another driving beat. Somehow, this introduction to the end is comforting and even celebratory. Other recommended tracks include “Wishing”, which seems to start as a slow burner before embarking on a wild dupstep ride and a wonderfully odd symphonic synth that the Cheshire Cat himself would enjoy.

“Day To Day” brings the feeling of comfort and sadness we’d expect from Adore-era Pumpkins, as Garnett’s pop sensibility and lead vocal comes into play again. Possibly the highlight of the album is “The Saddest Video Game”, which needs to be heard rather than described, as it’s choice of instrumentation and samples rank highly in the innovation category. It’s a listen that places you in an an alternate world. “Kojak” rounds out the EP with a bonus track, and probably the closest thing you’re likely to hear to a club single.

All in all, fans of interesting, artful electronic music should flock to Galilee, and rightfully so. Highly recommended listening.
James Moore, author & publicist

independentmusicpromotions.com

01 How did you get started in music?

In 5th grade music class my teacher made me learn some guitar chords because I couldn’t sing very well in the choir and I needed something to do for our recital. A few years later I became obsessed with rock music and guitar, taking a short detour with saxaphone in 7th grade. I started my first ‘band’ in 8th grade. We were terrible but I fell in love with all things rock and roll.

02 Where did your direction come from?

I started out listening to radio and ‘classic rock’ that’s where I learned song structure and melody. As I got older I branched out into all types of music, including electronica, house, industrial and techno and that’s where GALILEE came in.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

The list of influences is ever evolving, but I can say that I like artists that bring something original to the table. As far as electronic artists go, I really dig Infected Mushroom, Bassnectar, deadmau5, Nero, NIN, old Pigface. As far as who I despise, well, I guess I just try not to listen to stuff I don’t like so I don’t judge since music is always about the listener and it’s so subjective. I guess I can safely say I’m not a huge fan of Justin Beiber and prefab pop icons that don’t write or create their own music. But I don’t despise him either, he’s just a kid making loads of cash for what he does, whatever that is.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I like to experiment and not stay too long in one place musically that is. That’s something listeners will notice right away on the ‘Robot Arms’ e.p. Right now I want to start pushing boundaries of what’s considered electronic music, since it’s a format that really should be as limitless as imaginations should be.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Since I’m not a DJ and am only a music producer/songwriter there’snot much chance of a ‘live’ performance happening right away. That could change however under the right circumstances.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Usually I’ll have something stuck in my head for a few days before I start to arrange it in my homestudio. Once in a while I’ll just start monkeying with beats and see what happens. Sometimes there’s just no rhyme or reason for what I do, it just ends up a certain way. I like drama, sci-fi and horror, so I tend to create themes that might be considered ‘dark’. I’ve composed a couple of ‘happy’ songs and it just feels a bit weird for me. But it’s good to break yourself out of whatever musical box you crawl into now and then.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

I’d like to think I’ve grown mostly as a songwriter/composer and am constantly adding new elements and layers to my sound. I’m also more open minded about music than I used to be. I used to be somewhat of a purist and everything had to be in it’s right place. But that gets boring after a while and leaves no room for growth. So I’m in a constant state of musical evolution, God willing I’ll be doing this til the day I die so I don’t ever want to get stuck as an ‘artist’.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

The biggest challenge for me right now is combining genres in ways that people will accept and listen to. I just finished an electrohop track for an upcoming release and some people can’t get over that it’s not pure hiphop, as in old school. I don’t want to repeat what thousands before me have done, or why even bother right? So I’m working on that.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

There are a few covers I’d like to do but I’d like to keep that a surprise for now. Some of them could be terrible if not done just right. I think we all have a special place in our hearts for a good cover song that is done well. I would really want to make it my own, you know?

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Most likely working on my craft and putting out more album releases. Hopefully to a larger audience by then. LOL.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

That’s a hard question, since there are so many influential people that have shaped me into what I am. I’d love to record with Jim Morrison of The Doors, but since he’s no longer living…

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Starting August 1st, I’ll be putting out a new single each month until the end of the year, then we’ll probably put them out in some sort of e.p. or album depending on how much material I have. I’m also putting together a remix contest and the top 5 remixes will be featured in an upcoming release on VOD Recordings, which is the label I’m currently on.

Web Links: digdugdisaster.com

Facebook: facebook.com/DouglasGarnett

Twitter: twitter.com/DiGDuGDiSaSTeR

VOD Recordings: vodrecordings.net

Link to buy Robot Arms e.p.: 

‘Kojak’ FREE single here: 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 3, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Front page Interviews Music 0 Comment

DozenQ – Strangely Alright

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series DozenQ 3

Led by Singer Songwriter Regan Lane, Strangely Alright is a 5 piece lush pop rock band in the vein of Fallon Kush, Captain Wilberforce and John Hiatt. They are from Tacoma, Washington USA and have just released a full length CD “The Time Machine Is Broken” that is receiving rave reviews from around the world. We had a visit with lead singer and songwriter Regan Lane:

01 How did you get started in music?

My dad had a friend named James Cook who had a Fender Stratocaster and played locally in the Tacoma, WA USA scene in the late sixties and he taught me a few chords when I was a young lad. In the 6th grade of elementary school (11 years old) I went to The Honolulu Conservatory of Music for about 6 months and learned more of the basics. My first proper performance was a talent show at Jefferson Elementary where I sang “Twist and Shout” with just me on guitar and a drummer (The Beatles version, of course!). I’m sure we weren’t very good but it was the first time I felt comfortable in my own skin.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Girls and drugs. I was painfully shy as a kid and music was a way to be SOMETHING other than what I was… My family life was a dysfunctional mess with two parents that fought and drank and two younger sisters that I felt I had to take care of while we lived in the war zone that was our house. Music at that time was my escape. When I got on stage I suddenly felt different. Stronger, cooler, sexier…Lol. Girls would actually come up to talk and pay attention to me and the rich kids that I thought were cool at the time would give me free drugs, which made me feel… Stronger,cooler,sexier… Not the best way to get started in a career, but it’s my truth at that time of life.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Ahhh… The Beatles were the start… I first really remember getting in to them with Abbey Road. My mom bought it at a K-Mart store when I was a kid. I was amazed that on the second side of the LP that it was one long song… Lol… So in music my initial influences were The Beatles, David Bowie, The Kinks and Bob Dylan. In life some of my initial inspirations were/are Muhammad Ali, John Lennon, Gandhi, Martin Luther King. It’s inspiring when people stand for SOMETHING. As for the other, there’s a saying I learned awhile back. ‘Take what you need and leave the rest at the door’. So if it’s not my cup of tea, I don’t drink it.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I’ve found that I’m the sum of everything around me. And that includes the great group of guys in Strangely Alright. Their influence and feedback on my writing is huge in the current direction of the band. Along with those initial influences I spoke of, there is so much going on in music today that can take up little bits of space in my subconscious and start to influence the sound. And what’s happening in my life can directly influence the vibe of the sound. But in the end I dig classic pop music. Lately Lee Gregory (keys) been adding some nice synth touches and our drummer Preston Darvill always wants to rock it up a bit. We say we are going through our Weezer faze…lol… But that’s not a bad thing. Change is good.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

First off, we have fun. And we can rock! This band is technically and feel wise so cool to work with. I tell some short stories about where the songs come from and some of the meaning and thought behind them. The message I’m trying to convey is ‘Believe in You.’ We all have unique talents and gifts. And don’t let anyone tell you different. And I hear that I’m fairly theatrical in my performance so if you need a good laugh you can watch me flail about… Lol… We will be adding stage props  and going to bigger lineup soon. My hope is to have a multi/sexual, multi/cultural lineup some day. That would be cool.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I almost always start with the chords. The lyrics evolve and change right up until we get in the studio. Lyrically I’m more about being in the solution and dealing with my side of the street. At this stage in my life I want to write about real life issues, yet have a sense of whimsy and positivness underneath it all. My daughters inspire me with their open mindedness and belief that they can do anything. Life can strip away that belief. I’d like to think we can get it back.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

As a youngster I started out knowing exactly what I wanted to sound like. And through the years I got lost in wanting to fit in and follow trends. When I got clean and sober in 2001 I stopped hiding and fearing about you liking/loving what I do. It’s a battle though. I’m a people pleaser… Lol…  Today I follow my muse and listen to that weird little voice in my heart that lets me know if I’m doing the next right thing.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Learning to live life on life’s terms without chemicals and believing that I’m enough were the initial biggest hurdles. As I said, I’ve been in recovery since 2001.At first I thought my problems were bad luck, then I thought it was everyone else’s fault and finally I realized I could not drink like a gentleman… Lol… But the drugs and alcohol were just a symptom. The problem was me and I needed to work on me. It’s weird. I’m an egomaniac with low self esteem. So I continue the elusive search for balance. Basically,I’m a work in progress! As long as I don’t take that first drug or drink, I’m cool. I’m an active member in the program of my choice. I do at least two meetings a week, and that’s worked for me for some time.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We do some. Mainly oddball stuff that amuses us. We do a Credence Clearwater style version of Everyday People by Sly and The Family Stone. And a cool power poppy version of Kiss The Girl from The Littlest Mermaid. Covers are tough though. If we can make a song sound like we wrote it, then that’s a song we’ll keep.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

That’s hard to say. I don’t have a crystal ball, and I’ve found out that life can get in the way of the best made plans. Long term I’d like to see our songs on more TV shows and in a movie or two.  At this very moment the goal is to stay sober, continue to grow while writing and playing with this band  and balance that with being a good husband to my wife and and father to my girls.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Jon Brion. But my favorite person to work with in the whole REAL world is my producer and friend Todd Ensminger, who did the production on “The Time Machine Is Broken”. I’m blessed to have such a talented guy behind me. He gets me and I get him. It’s the best working relationship I’ve ever had. Oh yea… We’d both love to work with Aimee Mann… Lol

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

“The Time Machine is Broken” just came out June 1st so Strangely Alright is shooting a couple videos to promote it. They should be out in the next couple months. Then it’s back to the studio in October. We almost have enough material for a full length!

Web Links
strangelyalright.com – Strangely Alright Web Site
reverbnation.com/strangelyalright – ReverbNation
twitter.com/rlbarger -Twitter
facebook.com/strangelyalright – Facebook

Tour Dates
July 20th-Bite Of Seattle – Seattle, WA USA
August 6th– National Night Out- Tacoma, WA USA
August 17th– Garfield Street Fair – Parkland, WA USA
Sept. 6th – Louie G’s- CD Release – Fife, WA USA
Oct 19th – Hard Rock Café and Lounge – Seattle, WA USA

Link to buy the current single
cdbaby.com/strangelyalright – Buy!

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

July 3, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Front page Interviews Music Pop Rock Tags:, ,
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