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DozenQ – Tav Falco

TAV on the Radio http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=MJVXvPNQlCQ&NR=1 TAV at his best
This entry is part 1 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

In his work as a visual artist, writer and rock and roll musician Tav Falco has crafted an immediately recognizable blend of all things unique, visionary, familiar and yet obscure, dark/light and straight up stylish and rockin’. His recent book – Ghosts Behind the Sun: Splendor, Enigma & Death (Creation Books) – is a trip through the city of Memphis’ history that is part Falco biography, surreal fiction, crime noir and hipster gutter trawl. Fact mingles with hallucination and Tav pins the throttle.

If Tav comes to town with his Unapproachable Panther Burns combo or to do a book reading and presentation be sure not to miss it. They don’t often come as cool as Mr. Falco…

01 The book (Ghosts Behind the Sun: Splendor, Enigma & Death) was fabulous. I have to say though that some of the folks scared the bejeezus out of me – and I’m not talking here more about the wild ones from a hundred years ago either! My guess is there were more than a few dark, hot and humid nights that you found your pace quicken on a walk home?

Although I am now far away, the dark nights and steamy red/gray dawns of Memphis by the torrential Mississippi still haunt me… the world ends at dawn, right?

02 I’d like to ask you a little about motorbikes. My guess is you don’t have one now, or do you? Further to that, any interest in vintage scooters?

Just sold a 1969 Norton Commando to Germany, but I’ve already placed a deposit on a black & beige 1961 Norton Dominator 99 in England. I’m an inveterate Norton rider, though there is a place in the stable for a late 60s BSA Thunderbolt and an early 50s Triumph Speed Twin. For a mid-60s Lambretta 150, I once drove from Paris to L’Aquila (The Eagle), Italy (now destroyed by earthquake). I spent a summer with the scooter in Ljubljana. It was a fun machine with great character.

03 While a percentage of your audience and fan base are more than likely familiar with the artistic concepts behind Panther Burns, those that aren’t – at least as far as I see it – are still getting a heck of a rockin’ combo on top of some of the more heady ideas.  What are your feelings on that component of your audience and how much your skill as a musician has developed?

Panther Burns are a vision. It is an Orphic vision… not of the cosmos, nor of the mystic and the airy heavens, but a vision of the underground, of the unconscious where dark waters swirl. We have one song to sing, and we sing it different ways: with a hoodoo gait, or with the shimmer of falling moonlight over burning mansions, or with the sensual curve of a farewell embrace as the master rides off to battle with coat tails flying, never to be seen again….

04 Well then it completely makes sense that you and your musical contributors also have a taste for vintage and exotic guitars. What is the story behind that beautiful black Hofner of yours anyway? I admit to have been admiring it from afar for a great many years now.

My association with the Höfner violin-shaped 6-string guitar began rather early in the trajectory of Panther Burns. The first one I played was found in a Memphis attic around 1980 by a guitarist in the Randy Band. It was brown. I bought it and played it for awhile. Then I traded it for a Gretsch (seen on the Red Devil record cover). The Gretsch hardly had the sound and character of the Höfner, and when I saw a black one appear in a vintage shop in Memphis, I pounced on it. The black Höfner has the same factory installed active, push-button fuzz tone and treble boost that the brown one had. The guitar has become the signature sound of the Panther Burns, and I have not played another guitar over the past 30 years. It has a neck like a baseball bat, but it is an indestructible German workhorse.

05 Ghosts Behind the Sun discusses a number of the great Memphis music legends, are there any new things coming out of Memphis that you have heard lately that piqued your interest?

Sam Phillips, I once heard say that Nashville has a great thing going, but Memphis will always be a place for innovation. Let’s put it this way: in my mind, the Blues are eternal, and Saturday nights on Beale St., there will always be somebody picking a guitar on the corner or in a back alley evoking the twangs of love lost and won, of a working stiff’s misery, of the whip of the boss man, of the moans of hungry children, of mean women and the curse of betrayal, of dice tumbling in a leather horn, of the reaching arm of the law, of the pleasures of the brothel, and the laughter and tears of the Devil’s own music.

06 Your new home of Vienna is famous for a number of things including cafes. Have you found one that you can call your own?

Of the many cafés and Kaffehäuser in merry, sinister old Vienna, I have a number of favorites. If I were to name one that is my Stammcafe or regular haunt, I would say Café Central in the 1st district. It is a part of the neo-Gothic Palais Ferstil with vaulted high ceilings, enamel inlays, geometric frescoes, and lofty paintings of faded nobility. There is a fleet of waiters or Kellners scurrying over the parquet floors, serving coffee, champagne, and chocolate on small silver trays along with tasty, yet affordable meals. The Viennese tortes served there are exquisite. One can hardly be surprised that Café Central was the Stammcafe of choice by Sigmund Freud and his coterie of psychoanalysts. A place for camaraderie, it was the café where Leon Trotsky played his habitual games of chess, while the Viennese pooh-poohed his dreams of revolution.

07 Sounds fabulous. Of course you have also lived in some pretty diverse places including Paris and New York but what intrigues me too is your time spent in Buenos Aries. How did that all come about?

What drew me to Buenos Aires was the lure of the Tango, which I still dance religiously. In the words of Isadora Duncan in 1916 when she visited Argentina,
“My first steps were timid, but the feeling of the languid music caused my body to respond to the voluptuousness of the dance. Soft as a caress, toxic as love under the midday sun, cruel and dangerous as a tropical forest.”

08 Let’s get back to motorcycles here for a moment… Full face helmet? Half helmet and goggles? Gloves? I imagine driving in old cities like Paris and Vienna being quite a challenge in comparison to the open highways of the south. Apart from you are certainly less likely to run into an armadillo of course…

Although the occasional armadillo crossing the road can prove to be a daunting hazard, one thing I do miss about Arkansas is riding the unfettered, leafy back roads. In Europe riding the country lanes on my Norton Dominator 99 is kind of like a sultry burn through Camelot.  For a short burn say around the Ringstrasse of Vienna or a fast burn around the Trocadéro, I wear a half-helmet with a leather chinstrap leather gloves, and aviator goggles. For a medium run over the Höhenstrasse (High Road), a scenic road built in 1937 through the Vienna Woods overlooking the city, I put on a jet-helmet that is black with a white center stripe. For long hauls at maximum thrust, I wear a solid white full coverage casque and put on long gauntlet gloves. Invariably, I ride wearing the black and silver trimmed net-vest of the PBMC (Panther Burns Motorcycle Club).

09 Do you miss the comfort food of the south very often or was that never really your thing?

If you mean God’s own watermelon, Yes.

10 Ghosts Behind the Sun has been out a good 7 or 8 months now. I know you have mixed up readings with a photo display and even screenings of your video work and a performance by Panther Burns. Probably a bit hard to get a rock and roll crowd to be quiet during a reading, no?

Reading in London at Rough Trade Records East on May 30th, you could hear a pin drop. Geoff Travis, president of RT, was there and can attest to that.

11 Could you see yourself moving back to the US at some point or is life in Europe somehow better suited to your interests?

Life in Europe holds the utmost fascination, and I am living in a neutral country far removed from the aggression of war profiteering and the poisonous campaigns of Monsanto.

12 What’s next musically and artistically, if that isn’t gonna give too much away?

Presently I am editing my new 16mm film, URANIA DESCENDING: an intrigue featuring VIA KALI and KARL-HEINZ von RIEGL. Set in the old world of Vienna on the Danube, the narrative follows the precipitous descent of an American innocent who falls into discreet, yet decadent dalliances at Hotel Orient and her ultimate submersion beneath the dark, swirling waters of Lake Atter.

Photo: Via Kali

LINKS

Tav on Myspace

Nice Fan Site

PERSONNEL

  • Perry Michael Allen: keyboards, backing vocals: 1995
  • David Berger — drums: 2002
  • Barri Bob — percussion, rhythm guitar: some 1980s gigs
  • Orazio Brando — guest guitarist: 2005
  • Roy Brewer — violin: 1980s and 1990s
  • Benny Carter — drums: 1994
  • Grégoire Cat (real name: Grégoire Garrigues) — lead guitar: early 2000s onwards
  • Ben Cauley (also of The Bar-Kays) — trumpet: 1990s
  • Raymond Cavaioli — lead guitar: some 1980s gigs
  • Alex Chilton (aka L X Chilton) — lead guitar: 1979–early 1980s and occasional appearances thereafter; produced several of the albums
  • Rene Coman (also of The Iguanas/New Orleans) — bass: early to mid-1980s and occasionally thereafter
  • Peter Dark (also of Bellmer Dolls, real name: Peter Mavrogeorgis) — guitar: early 2000s; 2011
  • Jim Dickinson — producer and keyboardist: occasionally 1980s and 1990s
  • Peter Dopita — singing saw: 1991
  • Jim Duckworth (also of The Gun Club) — drums: 1981, lead guitar: early 1980s & 1989
  • Doug Easley — bass: occasionally
  • Ron Easley (aka Durand Mysterion; also of the Country Rockers) — lead guitar: 1980s and 1990s sporadically; producer: 1989
  • James Enck (later of Linda Heck and the Train Wreck) — lead guitar: 1984, 1991 (appears on bass on “Cuban Rebel Girl” from the “1984” cassette release)
  • Kai Eric (aka Red West) — bass: mid-1980s–2000 on most tours except some in the South U.S.
  • Tav Falco — band leader, lead vocals, guitar: since 1979
  • Cyd Fenwick — backing vocals, dancing: 1979– 1981
  • Kitty Fires 1 (real name: Sue Easley) — backing vocals: 1984; Kitty Fires 2 (different woman) — guitar: 2000
  • Bob Fordyce (also of the Odd Jobs) — drums: 1989
  • Doug Garrison (also of The Iguanas/New Orleans) — drums: 1996
  • Diane Green (also of The Hellcats/Memphis and the Odd Jobs) — theatrics, tambourine, dancing: occasional 1980s appearances
  • Alex Greene (also of Big Ass Truck and Reigning Sound) — organ: 1989–1990
  • Jim Harper — snare drum: 1981
  • Mark Harrison — guitar: 1984–1985
  • Linda Heck (later of Linda Heck and the Train Wreck) — bass: 1984
  • Jessie Mae Hemphill — snare drum: 1981
  • Eric Hill — synthesizer: 1979–1980; 1989
  • Douglas Hodges (aka Tall Cash) — drums: 2001–2002
  • Teenie Hodges — lead guitar: 1990s
  • Michael Hurt (also of The Royal Pendletons) — bass: 1999
  • Rick Ivy — trumpet: 1979
  • Cathy Johnson — backing vocals, dancing: 1979–1981
  • Ross Johnson — drums: since 1979 on a number of albums
  • Amanda Jones — backing vocals: 1984
  • Jules Jones -artistic collaborator for publicity flyers and costumes, Backing vocals in studio and live shows 1979
  • Via Kali — tango dancer at live shows: 2006 onwards
  • Kye Kennedy — lead guitar: mid-1980s touring
  • Gabriele Kepplinger — backing vocals: 1991
  • Little Victor — guitar, harmonica: 2005
  • Laurent Lanouzière — bass: 2002 onwards
  • Michael Lo (real name: Michael Rafalowitch) — bass: early 2000s
  • Andrew Love (also of The Memphis Horns) — saxophone: 1990s
  • Vickie Loveland — backing vocals: 1991
  • Tammo Lüers — guitar: 1995
  • Randall Lyon — theremin: 1991
  • Olivier Manoury — bandoneon: 1995
  • Bob Marbach — piano: 1991, 1995
  • Lisa McGaughran (aka Lisa Burnette on one compilation; also of The Hellcats/Memphis) — backing vocals, bass: 1984–1990
  • Ron Miller — bass: early 1980s
  • Jack Oblivian — bass, organ: 2000
  • Warren Scott (Band’s agent) 1980s
  • Robert Palmer — clarinet: 1989
  • Giovanna Pizzorno (also of The Hellcats/Memphis) — drums: first sporadic tours began 1986; steady member since early 2000s
  • Jon Ramos — bass: 2002
  • George Reinecke (also of Busted Flush) — lead guitar: 1980s and 1990s
  • Will Rigby (also of The dB’s, Steve Earle) — drums: 1980, 1999
  • Jimmy Ripp — guitar: 1983
  • Roland Robinson — bass: 1992
  • Kurt Ruleman — drums: 1984–1989
  • Raffaele Santoro — keyboards: 2010 onwards
  • Harris Scheuner — drums: 1989
  • Jim Sclavunos — drums: since about 1982 on a few albums, beginning with Blow Your Top
  • Jim Spake — saxophone: 1991
  • Brendan Lee Spengler — keyboards: 2000
  • Ken Stringfellow — bass: 2011
  • Nokie Taylor — trumpet: 1991, 1995
  • Nina Tischler — backing vocals: 1991
  • Lorette Velvette (real name: Lori Greene; also of The Hellcats/Memphis and The Kropotkins) — backing vocals: 1984–1990; guitar: 1984 briefly
  • Misty White (also of The Hellcats/Memphis and Alluring Strange) — drums: 1988
  • Vincent Wrenn — synthesizer: 1979–1980
  • Abe Young — bass drum: 1981

DISCOGRAPHY

  • Behind the Magnolia Curtain, 1981 (re-released 1994 and 2011)
  • Blow Your Top EP, 1983 (re-released 1994 and 2011)
  • Now, 1984
  • Shake Rag, 1985
  • Sugar Ditch Revisited EP, 1985 (re-released 1994)
  • Swamp Surfing in Memphis (various artists), 1986
  • The World We Knew, 1987
  • Play New Rose for Me (various artists), 1987
  • Red Devil, 1988 (re-released 1994)
  • Live Atlanta Metroplex 10-3-87, 1988
  • Midnight in Memphis (live), 1989
  • Return of the Blue Panther, 1990
  • Life Sentence in the Cathouse, 1992
  • Unreleased Sessions, 1994 (recorded 1980)
  • Deep in the Shadows, 1994
  • Shadow Dancer, 1995
  • Disappearing Angels, 1996
  • 2 Sides of Tav Falco, 1996
  • Love’s Last Warning, 1996 (best of collection)
  • Shadow Angels & Disappearing Dancers, 1997
  • Panther Phobia, 2000
  • Live at Subsonic, 2002
  • CONJURATIONS: Séance for Deranged Lovers, 2010

 


Colin -Mohair Sweets- Bryce

One of Canada’s late 70’s “punk” rock crowd and from 1997 to 2007 the fellow behind Mohair Sweets print and webzine. Currently passes the time by playing the odd gig or two, shaking his head, wringing his hands and pondering whether or not the tape vaults of the legendary Pirates are really exhausted.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Art Blues Cult Culture DozenQ Features Front page Garage Heroes Interviews Literature Music Rockabilly Tags:, , , ,
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DozenQ – Stone Foundation

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Stone Foundation are a seven piece band who hail from the Midlands and are inspired by a Modernist meeting of Rock n’ Soul influences, their sound combines the punch of a three piece horn section alongside whirling Hammond organ driven along by a dynamic ryhthm section and topped off with powerful emotive vocals resulting in a spirited, exciting, uplifting, heartfelt combination. The band have recorded 4 albums and have worked alongside the likes of Soul Legends Nolan Porter, Steve Calloway and Joe Harris of Motown’s Undiputed Truth. Last year they were invited as special guests of UK Ska Legends The Specials on their tour of UK arena’s picking up more followers and supporters of their music along the way. The band will release their new as yet untitled album early next year 2013…

01 How did your band get together?

I was uninspired and dissilusioned with my previous band for various reasons, I felt the need to get back to basics and start again afresh and remind myself of why I wanted to make music in the first place. I’d met Neil (jones) when I seen him perform in London, he was in a band that supported us at the old Laurel Tree and he stuck in my mind and that was the first call I made when I was looking for a singer and someone to front the band and it was his presence, enthusiasm and ultimately friendship that sparked it all off again for me.

02 Where did your name come from?

I had the name before I even had the band. I was reading Grand Royale, the beastie boys magazine publication, and there was an article on Andy Newmark the first white drummer/musician to play for Sly and the Family Stone and the heading of the piece was “Stone Foundation” and it just stuck with me. In fact my original plan was to call the band (a) Stone Foundation like the (a) Certian Ratio idea but I thought it may become too confusing in the long run.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

With Stone Foundation I wanted to get back to very things that first made me want to pick up a guitar and form a band so I re-connected with all of that – Dexys Midnight Runners, The ethics of the Jam and The Clash fused with Soul Music, like many British youths we have always been facsinated with Black american soul and roots culture but we are mindful to use those influences in a creative way as opposed to being derritive and pastiche.

I’ve kind of given up wasting time on thing like hatred and loathing things that are not to my tastes. I obviously find the celebrity driven aspect of our country as grating as most with the Simon Cowell’s of this world dictating what people should find acceptable but that throw away pop culture has always been present even in Golden periods. I find equally tiresome the fact that a record company would put out a new or re-packaged Toyah Wilcox or Blancmange record and then pass something like ourselves by!

04 What drove you to make music together?

I think all of us have the same intentions, we are like hopeless incurables, addicted to the creative process. Slaves to the Ryhthm ! I myself have been at that crossroads on a number of occasions where I have questioned if it is worth carrying on when I’ve been at a low but I have grown to realise and understand that it is part of what makes us as people, it defines who we are to some extent, it’s a way of life to us now.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Well you won’t see a show, it ain’t no act or theatre workshop production, if you pay your money to get in then you are going to see 7 people giving everything they’ve got, every time we step on stage we are looking for that spark, that magic to happen. We get as gutted as anyone if it doesn’t feel right, thankfully more often than not our gigs do catch fire, it’s where we feel most at home. I like to think that we have built up a good relationship with our audience over the last few years and it seems to growing stronger.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Most of our ideas and songs filter through Neil (Jones) and myself but that’s not to say that the rest of the band don’t have their input or contribute, whether myself or Neil have the bare bones of an idea or a fully structured song it will still change as it gets put through the arrangement process with the rest of the band. Lynn (Thompson) has very clear & strong ideas for brass arrangements and our drummer Phil (Ford) more often than not will see things that we haven’t and has a great ear and feel for arranging music.

Neil has a more traditional and orthodox approach to writing and is actually quite prolific, he probably throws more away as he does bring to the band where as I’m probably more experimental as an ideas person but it can take me forever to get my songs out there. Also Me & Neil don’t have a stranglehold over the creative process if someones got an idea or a song and it’s good then we would do it no matter who initiates it, there’s only two criterias – it’s either good and bad and just so happens that up to now we’ve written all the good ones!

We like to make our subject matter believable and something that people can relate to and could be open for their own interpretation.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

Well, we didn’t have the horns for a start and also me and Neil had to go through a few line up changes before we hit upon the right balance and assembled the right band and musicians that now are integral to Stone Foundation. Our first recordings where we just finding our feet and our sound were a little too “American” influenced for my liking, so we did make a concious decision to make sure that we made music that was representive of our background and surroundings, we re-assed the things that we wanted to do and what was important to us and from the “In our Time” album onwards our sound began to develop and blossom into the band we wanted to be and  I am convinced that our next record will be our most complete and important work yet.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

I think our biggest challenge to date arrived when we were invited to support The Specials on their UK arena tour of 2011 last year, it’s something you can only dream about like a Jim’ll fix it moment going from playing pubs and 200 capacity venues to 10,000 sold out arenas all over the Country. But, it’s also something that we, like every band, always thought wouldn’t it be great if we had that opportunity to go on a big tour but when that moment does arrive I don’t think that many could actually really rise to the occasion and the reality of it, you either sink or swim and it’s something that I’m really proud of that not only did we embrace the moment, I feel that as a band we really, really delivered every single night and that was evident in the response and reaction we got from those massive audiences every night. The key is to not get over awed by the sheer size of the event, it is just another gig but with a few more people in attendence and we will give as much at the Ricoh Stadium as we would at the Barfly. We actually felt comfortable on the big stages and I’m so grateful to have had that experience and once again it’s certainly made us a better band.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We don’t do many but I think it’s always good to throw in one or two in the live sets and funnily enough we are just in the process of changing them around again and I’m currently considering what to put in, maybe something to end the set with. We had been doing Tell me when my light turns green by Dexys on the last tour but now their back in business themselves playing unique and stirring shows so we no longer have to be the torch bearers for that legacy, it’s time to move on. I’d quite like to do “It’ll never be over for me” by Timi Yuro or “You’ve got to earn it” By the Staple Singers… good statement songs!

10 What do you love and hate outside of music?

We love clothes, Football and our families although not neccessarily in that order. Hate seems such a waste of energy, I was once an angry young man but I no longer see the point in holding grudges and despising things or people that you cannot change or affect, I’d rather channel those emotions positively.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Nick Lowe!

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

We are currently recording our next album which will contain our best work to date, that will be out early next year, in the meantime there are plans to release a limited number (500 CD’s only) of an official bootleg recording of our gig with Nolan Porter at the 100 Club from July. It recently came to our attention that someone had recorded the gig and we are now in possesion of the tapes and have the option of putting it out ourselves, it’s such an honest & exciting document of the night and our collaboration with Nolan that it’s seems silly not to make it readily available.

Thanks to: Neil Sheasby – Stone Foundation – August 2012

 

*All images © stonefoundation and their own photographers

stonefoundation.co.uk/
facebook.com/stonefoundation
twitter.com/stonefoundation

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Features Front page Interviews Modernist Music Soul Tags:, , , ,
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DozenQ – Folk Grinder

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Folk Grinder frontman singer songwriter Koozie Johns former guitarist with Sex Pistols bassist ‘Glen Matlock and The Philistines’ and frontman for ‘Sinnerstar’.

01. How did your band get together?

KJ: Folk Grinder was formed in March 2010, by myself and Slovakian born accordionist/pianist Miro Snejdr who I first met in a pawn brokers in London in 2008. Miro was skint and about to sell his accordion, I told him I was looking for an accordion player and stepped in and bought it him back. I’d been living in Redondo Beach California for a couple of years and had written an album’s worth of sea shanties that had been inspired from living by the sea and being away from the UK. We originally tried out some of these songs with a full band that was made up of previous members of my old band Sinnerstar, but it wasn’t working out. So a more stripped back skiffle approach was sought after and when we tried it, it just worked and I love it.

02. Where did your name come from?

KJ: We wanted a name that sounded like it could have been a Tarantino movie title and we thought Folk Grinder kinda fits that. We play sea shanty Rock’n’Folk’n’Roll which has various elements of folk music all mashed up with a stripped back sound and a Rock’n’Roll sailor vibe.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

KJ: Influences are many, both from music and film, Tom Waits to Cat Stevens, The Clash to 56 Elvis to the London music hall greats and skiffle acts. Film Noir, Alfred Hitchcock and Tarrantino movies. The inspirations for the songs have mainly come from my own colourful life and how I’ve lived it. I despise manufactured stuff such as all that x-factor crap and fake celebrity shit.

04. What drove you to make music together?

KJ: When Miro and I first hooked up we didn’t know if it would work out or not , but something magical was really happening which told us to go with it. We met up in the basement of Enterprise studios down Tin Pan Alley, Denmark Place in London’s West End and ran through a few tunes in a room that used to be EMI’s old masters vault and it just kind of clicked. We then decided to go ahead and demo some songs in the spring of 2010 and see what we had and kinda put together a blueprint of our sound.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

KJ: Folk Grinder are primarily myself on vocals/guitar and Miro Snejdr on accordion/ piano with the added occasional guest players on some tunes. The idea being where ever we play the audience will never know whether a guest is gonna get up with us or not and join us on a song or two,whether it’s a mate or a name it’ll be a surprise. Whatever, we guarantee the audience a good time of foot stomping singalong sea shanties and bordello Rock’n’Roll.

06. Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

KJ: I write songs covering various topics such as love, addiction, sin, salvation, pain and affliction, stuff that I’ve gone through, some biographical some not.

07. How did your music evolve since you first began playing together?

KJ: It’s all evolved quite naturally and we are pleased with how it’s all come together and found it’s place, the time is right.

08. What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

KJ: In a market place saturated with over produced and manufactured music what we have to offer is real, gritty and proving to be a breath of fresh air.

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

KJ: We play strictly original material but we have recorded a cover of the Iggy Pop classic ‘The Passenger’ which was recorded/produced by Steve Ellis who has worked with Mick Jones and Frank Black. When we’ve included it in our live set we have filled the stage with various guests and that’s been fun to do and it’s a real audience pleaser, because everyone knows the song and how to sing the chorus LaLaLaLaLaLaLaLa. We’ve also covered ‘Pay me my money down’ by Pete Seeger.

10. What do you love and hate outside of music?

KJ: I love the tranquility of the English countryside and calm seas. I hate greed and ill manners, wars and conflict and our absurd governments.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

KJ: Captain Pugwash

12. What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

KJ: Our long awaited debut album recorded earlier this year and produced by the legendary Kirk Brandon (Spear of Destiny/Theatre of Hate/Dead Men Walking) will be out this autumn, so Folk Grinder will be out touring everywhere so be sure to catch a show… Heave Ho!

Thanks to: Koozie Johns – Folk Grinder – August 2012

*All images © Folk Grinder and their own photographers, Tina Newbury & Graham Hilling.

Links

facebook.com/folkgrinder
facebook.com/folkgrinder
facebook.com/englanddreaming
myspace.com/folkgrinder

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 16, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Features Folk Front page Interviews Music Rock Tags:, , , , ,
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DozenQ – Los Thyssen

This entry is part 4 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Los Thyssen was formed in O Grove, Galicia (Spain) in the summer of 2011. Mack Paramo is the main songwriter and handles guitar and vocals. Pitu on bass and Dr. Motocross o Muerte play drums. They are the most exciting new band of Garage, Wild Surf, even Punk and a lot of lisergic. From Muddy Waters to Johnny Thunders through Cream, Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Blues Magoos .. They are here for remember you how to Rock and Roll as it should be!

01. How did your band get together?

We are all from a small town in northern Spain. Mack Paramo and Dr. Motocross o Muerte played together into multiple bands, including the very great Zoofilia-a-a, in the summer of 2011 decided to make a band with Pitu, Motocross older cousin.

02. Where did your name come from?

The name derives from the nickname Thyssen Mathiason, “son of Matthias’, refers to an ancestor of the early twelfth century. Cream was already chosen and opted for Los Thyssen. You know about Tita Cervera??

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Veronica Moser is our greatest influence. Lesser extent are from Robert Johnson, Muddy Watters, Chuck Berry, Link Wray, Dick Dale, Ventures… to Cream, Hendrix, Beatles, Sonics, Stooges, MC5 … We despise? The bad trips and the music made by and for crap modern people.

04. What drove you to make music together?

Basically got drunk a lot one night, and the next day we had a group made … So remember kids, put always on a condom!!!

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Can expect to return home without his girl and be a good rock and roll kicks throughout his face.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Mack Paramo is the main songwriter and main topics are El Ciervo, drugs, girls … girls with drugs, get high with girls…

07. How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

The first day we played we had only 3 songs, now, a year later, we have about 30. Not need to know maths to see that things are going well. For the rest of us we flirt as always.

08. What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Honestly, our biggest challenge has been putting up with ourselves. We overcame this thanks to our love of art, the art of drinking!

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Currently play a couple of songs by The Beatles in surf-instrumental way and the Dick Dale´s classic Surf-Beat. Pitu would like to do “Blue on Blue” by The Ikettes, Motocross want to do “Tengo una piedra” by Damas Gratis and Mack Paramo would like to make “This Weed is Mine” by Snoop Dogg.

10. What do you love and hate outside of music?

We like girls, the Aurum beer and the fiscal paradises. Hate the asslickers that all they want is to exhibit in our museum and hate too the insolvency.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

With anyone, it is they who would like to record with us.

12. What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

This winter goes on sale our first EP, released by Smoky Carrot Records. Hopefully soon we can get an LP. We have a lot of songs that people should listen to be happier and make more love…

Links

facebook: facebook.com/pages/Los-Thyssen
Record Label: smokycarrot.com
And you can hear the new 4 songs EP here: official.fm/losthyssen

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Features Front page Garage Genres Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – The Shit

This entry is part 5 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Started in the Fall of 2010, this Rock N Roll super group comes from the vast, drity corners of the Swiss underground music scene. Featuring members from The Come N’ Go, Reverend Beat-Man’s Blues Trash Trio, The Licks, Unhold, The Fuckadies, Boob, Ray Wilko, King Pepe, The Pornostuntman, Bishop’s Daughter and dozens of more groups you never heard of, The Shit will deliver a pile of fuzzy filthy trash rock you’ll be sure to love!

01. How did your band get together?

To make a long story short, I was born in 1966 and grew up listening to tons of Rock & Roll music in Orange County, California. I played in a variety of garage bands, one in particular was named the Miracle Workers, and after some success with our recordings we toured extensively in the Europe and the U.S.A. in the late 80’s and early 90’s. During my visits to Europe I fell in love with the people and the town of medieval Berne, Switzerland. So much that I moved from Los Angeles to Berne in 1991.

While living and playing in a variety of bands here in Berne I met lots of amazingly crazy musicians and artists over the years. After a while I began spending my free time writing and recording my own songs, kind of a private side project. I played the songs to my close friends and the response to my tunes were so positive I decided I wanted to put together a real hard hitting Rock & Roll garage band. Somehow it became quite clear which guys to ask to join the band, and all of a sudden, we became The Shit.

02. Where did your name come from?

When we started the band we started discussing what kind of band name to come up with. I thought of a few facts that were important for a Rock band: 1. Something that you can remember 2. A name that will at least shock your mother. 3. It has to have ‘The’ in the band name. So I made a post on Facebook that we are searching for a band name with those requirements and after a few days we received over 100 suggestions (and quite a lot of cool names) and someone commented with The Shit. It just looked perfect, short and sweet, somehow, and says it all. So since then we are proudly called The Shit!

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I tell ya, I’ve always been a sucker for raw, primitive 60’s punk music. I love the simplistic rhythms and arrangements by those musically unqualified teenagers, especially when LSD hit the scene. Bands like The 13th Floor Elevators, The Seeds, Question Mark & The Mysterians, The Chocolate Watchband and the 1000s of other bands from the mid-sixties have been my main influence from my early youth til today. I don’t think The Shit mold our sound like that, not in a retro way, but I see the 60’s garage movement more as a guiding beacon of light… ‘Pound the drums, ‘scream and shout’ about love gone wrong, and then add some fuzz guitar and a fat ass bass and loads of Yeah Yeah Yeah!’

And honestly, I can’t say I really despise any music, I just take the means to avoid listening to what does not reflect well with with me. And for what it’s worth, I dig shit like Black Metal, Hip Hop and Techno, I can hear it’s merits to society, but I just don’t want to listen to it all the time. But I will say something: Listening to crap like Lady Gaga does help me realize the kind of music I ‘Do’ want to play way more then bands I totally love.

04. What drove you to make music together?

When I put the band together I asked some of my best friends to join the band. There is chemistry that works in between us and I just trusted my intuition in asking each member to join. We all have our special powers and wield them like wizards, so I blame it on the gods for getting us together, we’re on a mission from the higher forces.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Expect to see four men getting really sweaty, screaming and playing their hearts out and churning some loud sonic trash that makes you feel alright and outta-site!

06. Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

The tunes we’re playing span from an isolated songwriting phase I went in through from 1999 til 2011. They involve the meetings and break-ups of wives, girlfriends and other potential mates. Lots of sexy themes and broken hearts. You know… TheReal Shit.

I did throw in a few other themes on the new album that deal with crap like the taxman and how shitty the radio has become. But for the most part my songs are all about love and why it’s so bloody difficult to find the one you truly love.

07. How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

I’ve noticed our music evolving after we began playing live shows. A band can rehearse a song so many times but until you perform it live, you can’t really say how the song’s effect will have on a listener. So we’ve taken quite a few of the songs back to ‘the drawing board’ to analyze them and loosen the arrangements up a bit, you know, to help make them boogie a bit more. I truly believe we are on the right track now.

08. What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

I think raising money to produce our latest recording was our biggest challenge, Though in the end I can proudly say I think we conquered that project with flying colors. We decided to create an online ‘crowdfunding’ project to allow people to donate to our project, and it worked out much better than we expected. In the end, it’s pretty rewarding producing your own records, and the challenge to finally send off 170 packages to our donators all around the world was exhilarating. And… it’s already feeling like we’re ready to do it again!

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Hmmmm…. we do play cover songs but only when we run out of our own songs. We’ve been dabbling with covers from Black Sabbath to Black Flag, as well as songs from Bo Diddley to The Sonics. They kinda just pop out, like a pimple. There is one song that’s had me by the balls lately called ‘Ain’t Nothing But A House Party’ by The Tremeloes. The J. Geils Band do a fuckin’ ripping version of that one, so I’m headed in that direction the next time we got a moment.

10. What do you love and hate outside of music?

Like I mentioned before, I don’t despise anything, I just love some things more than others. Honestly, I love everything.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

Well, we just did it! We recorded last Summer at the legendary Rancho De La Luna in the Joshua Tree Desert, California. We had the honor of some good old friends who’ve played in such bands like Queens Of The Stone Age, Masters Of Reality and Eagles Of Death Metal made their debuts on our new album. So needless to say, we’re just simply feckin’ stoked. And trust us, we’d love to do that all over again.

12. What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Well since there are more bands on the planet then ever before I am just happy to have some cool gigs coming up and really looking forward to recording some new tunes. We would have the reputation to start pushing our weight around, but we ain’t into that. No big plan for a World Domination tour. Actually, we are truly happy playing gigs around Switzerland at the moment, selling our music online and just building up a fan base that’s based on love and trust for dirty Rock, not that crap you read about in some fancy glossy magazine. We’re looking forward to what whatever come, because it will come anyway… and we’re totally ready for it!

Links

facebook: facebook.com/ILoveTheShit
youtube: youtube.com/brotherpantichrist

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Features Front page Garage Genres Interviews Music Rock Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Ali Ingle

This entry is part 6 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Hi, I’m Ali ingle. A 22 yr old singer/songwriter from Liverpool. I started playing guitar and writing at about 16. A great love of music and words are what drive me. I am hoping to create honest music for a generation of dreamers.

I have independently released my debut EP THE MAN AND THE MONSTER, which is available to buy at itunes, Amazon and Spotify. From this Ep I have released two singles, both came with official videos that I wrote, directed and starred in, you can view them on Youtube.

01. How did you get started in music?

I was always a big fan of music and I started by putting some really short one minute songs up on the ancient wonder that is Myspace. The reason they were only a minute long was because that was the longest I could record for on the computer I had at the time. From there I was offered a gig, and the rest is as they say ‘history’.

02. Where did your obvious love of film and visuals originate from?

I guess like most people i have my parents to thank for that. I remember sitting up with my Mum as a child watching films like ‘The Deer Hunter’ and ‘Leon’. As well as watching ‘Apocalypse now’ with my Dad. I just always loved the magic and creativity behind films. The fact that it is probably the only time I can sit still for more than 5 minutes as well. With the videos I’ve been putting out I just wanted to show my own love for film with my music as the soundtrack.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

My major influences musically were always artists such as Van Morrison, Billy Bragg, David Gray, Jeff Buckley. All the heavyweight songwriters that have shown me and many more, a way to express yourself. I don’t dare say I despise anyone! I’ve been lucky enough to have very few run in’s with the arseholes that seem to outline the business.

04. What drove you to make this type of music?

There was no intent for style or sound. The sound I have is just what came naturally. When I write a song I try not to think about style. Originality is the key. Or at least as much originality as possible.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

I always try and bring something different to the live shows. More rawness and energy. Some of my favourite gigs I’ve ever been to sounded nothing like the recordings. That doesn’t mean I don’t play to the best of my ability and I even try to be better live than the recordings.

06. What frames your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I deal with things everyone goes through. I’m lucky to come from a very working class background and to be so connected with people around me. I think the moment I start distancing myself is the moment I won’t understand what people want to hear. I’m inspired by everything that goes on around me, from love, lust, hope, despair, anger and the frustrations we all face in the world we live in.

07. How did your music evolve since you first began playing?

I think like anything I just got better with time. I worked on my writing and playing and through meeting new people and collaborating a lot I learnt new techniques. If you are not going forwards, your are going backwards.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

My biggest challenge came before releasing the first EP. I had no money, I’d lost most of my interest through laziness and sitting on the bench, and I was honestly ready to give up. If I didn’t have so many people around me who believe in me, I don’t think I would have carried on.

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I don’t play covers but a song I do like a lot is Romeo and Juliet by Dire Straits. I’ve played it to myself and to people I know, but I’d never play a cover at a gig unless the moment called for it.

10. What do you love and hate outside of music?

As I said earlier, another big passion is films. I’ve always secretly dreamed of being an actor or director and I think we all need a dream that we don’t necessarily intend to come true. If we achieve every dream we’d lose the will to want and try. I play sports occasionally but I think if we were involved in a classroom game I’d be picked last sadly. I think when it comes to hate the only things I dislike certain types of people. I mean I love most people, but there are so many who can bring us down, and stop us from moving on. They are the only things that make me angry or blue.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

I think I’ve been lucky enough to record with a lot of people I have admired. It would be so good to record with Regina Spektor or David Gray. I love the quirkiness and amazing voice of Regina, and David Gray has been the biggest inspiration in my life. So it just makes sense.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Well the new EP is due for release late October. There will be a video for the first single from that EP. And I will follow it up with many gigs and more videos. So please keep listening and watching and I’ll keep doing my best to entertain the people who are fantastic enough to care. xx

Links

aliingle.co.uk
facebook.com/aliingle
twitter.com/@Aliingle 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Folk Front page Genres Indie Interviews Music Pop Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Allan Crockford

This entry is part 7 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Allan Crockford of Galileo 7

As a member of such semi-legends as the Prisoners, The Solarflares, JTQ, Thee Headcoats and more recently The Stabilisers (amongst a much longer list), Allan Crockford has played an important if low-key part in establishing the Medway area’s reputation as a hotbed for spirited, uncompromising garage rock with a strong DIY ethic. Playing with such Medway notables as Graham Day, Billy Childish and James Taylor, his reputation was as the reliable sideman for more flamboyant figures. Now he has found a late flowering talent for writing his own material. The Galileo 7 were formed to play the songs he had been storing up for the last 3 or 4 years. The alternative was to go busking alone in Chatham High Street, a course of action which would have inevitably lead to a long stay in hospital.

01. What first got you into music, specifically forming a band?

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love music. The sounds of late 60’s pop music must have filtered into my consciousness from a very early age. One of the earliest news items I recall having an impact on me was the Beatles split. I remember it being a lead story on the BBC early evening news bulletin, so I must have been into them from very early on. I liked the usual stuff, Beatles, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, The Who etc but it never occurred to me that it was possible for me to play music like that, despite (or because of) enduring years of weekly organ lessons as a child. I played songs from the Beatles songbook on a Hammond with one of those horrible rhythm boxes, but actually being in a band with other people was not a concept I understood. I started reading the weekly press and listening to John Peel in late 76/77 and became aware of something called Punk rock amongst all the over-earnest rock… It seemed that the main point about this weird movement was that it told us that our current musical heroes were up their own arses and ‘the kids’ needed to make their own music. I never stopped liking the music I already liked (but I pretended I didn’t for a while), and I got an acoustic guitar. Having had music lessons helped a bit, but learning to play rocknroll on a Spanish guitar isn’t easy. It was only when I saw the Jam on their first appearance on Top of the Pops in april 1977 that I got the electric shock of realising THAT was what I wanted to do. But first of all I needed an electric guitar and an amp, and also some kindred spirits…. When I saw a local band called Pop Rivets (Billy Childish’s first band) play in pubs round our way that was the decider. They were great – a band inspired by punk that played unfashionable 60s covers along with their own stuff. Their two albums are still in my top 10.

02. Which artists did you like when you first got into music? Are they different to the ones you were into when you first became a musician?

As I mentioned, I was mainly into the mainstream rock artists that everyone was into if they weren’t only interested in chart pap. It was punk and new wave that got me into actually making music and being in a band so from that time onwards that was what I bought and listened to. Usually the more pop end of the spectrum, but as long as it had energy and came on 7” black vinyl. The Jam, XTC, Stranglers, Buzzcocks, Sex Pistols, Clash, Soft Boys and loads of little bands that made one or two singles and disappeared, like Tours, The Stiffs etc. And of course the Pop Rivits. But I quickly found out that a lot of these bands were referencing older or more obscure artists from a time just before I discovered music – the Doors, Small Faces, The Creation, Love, Stooges and lots of no-hopers from a previous generation of punks. The kind of stuff that is now called Garage Rock or Nuggets, Freak Beat – whatever label you like. The kind of stuff that it was very difficult to track down. I also discovered the very earliest music of bands that I already liked such as the Who, Pink Floyd, Deep Purple, and realised that they mostly got it right first time and spend the rest of their careers getting worse…. in my opinion!

03. Which of today’s artists do you like? How do they compare to your earliest favourite artists?

Liking music in middle age is different from liking it as a youngster. There isn’t quite the emotional resonance and connection with a lot of music, and the fact that as a musician you tend to know the tricks tends to take away some of the magic. A lot of it is tied up with growing up, after all. But recently I’ve got into Tame Impala and Soundtrack of our Lives. I like bands who obviously have some of the same influences as me, but who take it in another direction.

04. Who do you think your audiences are? What do you think are they like?

Well if they have heard of or liked any of my previous bands then they are probably a bit older than your average indie fan! Probably sharing a love for obscure 60’s garage/psych, punk rock of both generations and with vaguely mod tendencies. If anyone is into the current band it’s more than likely they are familiar with the previous bands. Once you’re out of the first flush of youth as a musician it’s difficult to pick up new fans, although the internet has made it a bit easier. Luckily, I don’t make music for anyone else… it’s for my own satisfaction and the challenge.

05. If you had to describe your band to someone who had not heard you before, what would you say?

The question all musicians hate….! Sort of 2 and a half minute songs with a DIY Medway garage/psych/punk/powerpop/indie/mod/freakbeat feel. It used to be called pop music I think.

06. Which artist(s) would you be happy to share a festival bill with, and why?

Anyone. If someone offered us a festival slot then I really wouldn’t care who it was with. Sometimes I think the audience doesn’t care either!

07. What song or arrangement of your own are you most proud of and why?

I’m kind of proud of most of the stuff I’ve played on whether I wrote it or not. I spent the first x decades of my musical career playing other people’s songs and thinking that writing songs was beyond my modest talents as a bass player or guitarist. I was always pleased to make a contribution to the playing and production of songs by other members of the bands I was in, whether it was the Prisoners/Solarflares/ James Taylor Quartet/Headcoats or whatever. I’m proud that I discovered I could actually write songs a few years ago and eventually made those songs into the first Galileo 7 album. The only problem with becoming the main songwriter/singer in a band is that it makes me more critical and less able to listen to the songs dispassionately. I have no real idea whether they are any good or not, although some people whose opinions I respect have said they are (mostly) good. Or at least OK! It’s probably best not to spend too much time analysing your own work and just get on with the next thing. Only time reveals the quality or lack of it of one’s own music…

08. Which producer (still alive and this side of prison) would you like to work with most, and why?

No idea really…. you never know if you’re going to get on with someone until you’re faced with having to work creatively with them. We had some poor experiences with producers forced on us (The Prisoners, JTQ) by record companies who didn’t really get what we were doing. The records I like least that I’ve been involved with are the ones that had ‘producers’ that weren’t us or someone directly connected to the band. Having said that I think it would have been good to work with the team of house technicians and producers who made all the classic EMI/Abbey Road records in the 60’s. But as for working with so-called creative genius producers, it doesn’t appeal to me. Not that I’m ever going to get the chance!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Unanswered.

10. Do you find different parts of the country or world are easier or harder to connect with? Why do you think that?

Not particularly, but I always prefer gigging outside of the UK. It may just be that fact that artists tend to get treated a little better by promoters and venues and that puts you in a better mood for the gig, or it may be that getting out the country just makes it feel more like an adventure. But most of my favourite gigs have been on tour in Europe. The UK audience can be very stand-offish ( or even stay away from the gig-ish!). But I am obviously making a massive generalisation here. If a gig is good it doesn’t matter where it is.

11. If you could backtrack through your career, what would you edit, if anything?

No regrets about the music. No point. Some records and songs are better than others, but you can only do your best at the time and leave it for other people to decide whether they like it or not. If I could change anything positive, it would be that I wish that some of the earlier bands I played in had been a bit nicer to people, but that was the ignorance and arrogance of youth…

12. How do you see Galileo 7 progressing in say the next five years?

No plans beyond keep writing, recording and playing and enjoying it. As long as I feel I’m not making a fool of myself we’ll carry on. Once you’ve gone past a certain stage in life, making our sort of music becomes its own reward, not a ticket to fame and fortune or even fulfilling some sort of artistic vision. Not that fame and fortune was ever an option with the sort of racket we’ve been making for the last few years!

Links
thegalileo7.fourfour.com
facebook.com/thegalileoseven
facebook.com/thegalileo7 

Photos by: Phil Dillon

NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE NOW!
All the pre-orders are in the post (first class of course) and the album is now officially released. High Quality 180gm vinyl and normal quality CD versions are available from the store. If you like your musical formats invisible and weightless, it’s also available from iTunes. Buy the vinyl – that’s where it sounds best!

Scenester

Scenester lives in London and Brighton, as time allows. Enjoys music, film, television, books, design and anything else which won’t leave well alone. Old enough to know better.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Features Front page Garage Genres Interviews Modernist Music Pop Tags:, , , , , , , , ,
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DozenQ – The bad joke that ended well

This entry is part 8 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

The bad joke that ended well play a garage rock, psychedelic and blues infused music with incredibly energetic shows. Playing on 60’s garage and psychedelic influences such as the 13th floor elevators to The Monks as well as influences ranging from Tom Waits to The Black Lips. This is the bands second record, the first having been released a year ago and having a country twist to it. The band play with a distorted banjo at times that ads to the diverse sounding garage feel. In the line up is also guitar, bass, drums and organ. The new album which is self titled has 8 tracks on it which range from ‘I’m not there’ a full blown carnage of a garage punk rock song to dance of the dead being a sombre guitar led blues piece. The band are based in Bristol, UK.

01. How did you get started in music?

We started off as a three piece playing in our home. I was playing (Alex – singer guitarist, banjoist) drums with a bass drum on one foot and a tambo-shoe on the other. Theres only so far you can go with that so we got drums in and eventually some organ.

02. Where did your direction come from?

I used to be in a band called Ballbag Express and the Marching Band where we played country rock and blues. We had a banjo playing with distorted guitars and I liked that so I just carried it on to this band. Now were dropping the banjo a bit more because we think we’ve exercised that instrument enough. Thats kind of where it started. That and boredom.

03. Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Honestly we all like very different music. I personally take a lot of influence from old 60’s garage as well as a lot of psychedelic stuff. Obvious bands such as The Doors, 13th Floor Elevators and Love influence me heavily but do much less for other members in the band. In-fact our drummer hates The Doors. I’m also a huge fan of the new garage movement happening mostly in the States. Bands like Ty Segall, The Back Lips, The Growlers, Demons Claws, Mikal Cronin, The UFO Club, Night Beast etc. As I said we take influence from a lot of things. When I grew up a listened to a lot of grunge as did Mat. John and Edu enjoy some electronic music and Jason loves 80s power rock. I take big influence from the likes of Tom Waits and Elliott Smith as well as old blues like Blind Willie Johnson and Mississippi John Hurt. I could go on forever so I’ll stop!

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Theres quite a good movement going on with garage music right now and I feel we havnt had a rock n roll movement for a while. I like the idea of being able to go out and watch bands knowing your more likely too see something good than bad because everyone riding the same wave. Saying that though were not playing this type of music for any other reason than thats what comes out when we play. I love it and I love playing it live. Theres a lot of energy in it and alcohol to fuel it.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Were not good looking. We got very energetic shows. In-fact we had a couple of slower songs that we’ve axed from the set because people loose attention unless your constantly on some high octane level. Were constantly making new songs and testing them at shows so that you shouldn’t get bored from hearing the same thing over and over.

06. How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Generally I write a skeleton of a song and bring it to the practice room and we see what evolves. Other times something just comes out of nothing while were practicing. As for themes. This album has a lot of mountains and alcohol in it. The last album was more about the end of the world and mountains. I guess theres more in there but its up to the listener to interpret it as they like.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Its moved on a lot from me in front of my computer with a banjo, guitar, tambo-shoe and cardboard box. There was a country influence thats all but gone. I still like the stories but im not aiming on a folk or country song in any sense or form. We also had some accordion in there for a while. That was interesting. Its pretty much straight forward psychedelic garage rock now… maybe with some blues thrown in.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? Have you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Recording. Money and money. We want to record and release more but it costs money. I’ve just started a record label and were releasing our current record on vinyl that way. I had to work a lot to pay for it but its the only way it’ll happen. As for overcoming it. No. Were nearly ready to record the next album and I have no idea how were going to pay for it.

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We’ve never done a cover and I don’t think we’ve got time for them. It takes long enough practicing our own songs let alone someone elses. I think we played Whole Wide World by Wreckless Eric once in practice. That was good. We’ll cover that. Either that or Primitive by The Groupies or I’m a Man by Spencer Davies Group. I did want to do that The Bag I’m in by The Fabs but Ty Segall just covered that.

10. Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Hopefully about 10 records down and earning more than enough money to keep on making them.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

Tom Waits or Steve Albini.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Sell some records, play some shows, record the next record and do it all again.

Links

Facebook: thebadjokethatendedwell
Website: the-bad-joke-that-ended-well
Sound cloud: the-bad-joke-that-ended-well
Record Label: stolenbodyrecords

Photos by: Harry Rook

“Heavy drug addled blues, booze soaked rock ‘n roll perversion. These dudes are keeping the English tradition of the fuzz drenched face melt alive. Do yourself a favor and buy that shit!.” – Al Lover (San Francisco Producer)

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Blues DozenQ Features Front page Garage Interviews Music Rock Tags:, , , , ,
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DozenQ – TaQuita Thorns

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Coming straight out of Detroit, Michigan, the birthplace of Motown music, TaQuita Thorns is the ultimate Rock&Soul diva. Impressing crowds with her solid powerhouse vocals and charismatic presence, the singer performs a sultry mix of pop songs set to unique R&B, house, disco and funk inspired beats. Following two hit shows on MTV (Making the Band 3, The TaQuita and Kaui Show, ) TaQuita has been working diligently as a prolific songwriter and recording artist. TaQuita’s artistry draws from her life journey and brings to life the boundless energy and positivity that drives this exceptional young talent. Fully equipped with a sparkling gift and charisma to match, TaQuita Thorns is surely one of the most exciting new R&B music artists to emerge in years.

01. How did you get started in music?

I’ve been singing and performing all my life and started writing when I was five. Music is something that I have to do, I want to do and I need to do. My parents and grandparents began to showcase me at an early age. I was exposed to some of the best music ever created, especially that of the Motown Era. I have been working toward my dream of performing my music on the world’s stage.

02. Where did your direction come from?

My direction comes from within. From G-d if you will. I am inspired by and pay homage to the many great artists who came before me and have made this walk easier for me and generations to come. These artists showed how great music can connect with people all over the world to inspire and uplift them and help make them happy.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Little Richard, Tina Turner, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Michael Jackson Aretha Franklin, Jimmie Hendricks, Rick James, Bob Dylan, Martha and The Vandellas, The Temptations, Anita Baker, Sade, En Vogue, Luther Vandross, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Sam Cook, Junior Walker and the Allstars, and many more. I despise no one. I have no strength for grudges or negativity in my heart.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I have no particular sound. It’s a never-ending river of grooves and blues. My mood at the time of creation tends to influence the type of song that I write at any given moment.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Love and excitement. I give of myself completely on stage in the most generous and purest fashion. My music comes from my heart and experience. Fans would have to come out and be a witness themselves.

06. How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

My songs all tell a personal story from my life. The themes and subjects deal with love, being honest with yourself and others, the virtues of self-respect, self-love and self-confidence. My songs also often address the need to stand up to adversity and adversaries.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

It’s still evolving! Lol. You can never know enough. For example: my music has evolved from taking online classes about music, reading various books about music, producing and song writing, and working with a vocal coach like Seth Riggs. I feel like I’m constantly growing as a songwriter.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

One of my biggest challenges was to completely trust my thoughts and ideas over others. This is my mind, body, soul and art. I own it! The opinion of others is a distant song. My first mind is usually the best way for me to go, and I have learned to trust my own judgment and intuition about my music.

09. Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I love to play covers. It’s a great way to pay homage to artists who I look up to as leaders and who motivated me. I love to cover “Proud Mary” by Ike and Tina Turner. I also like to cover “Shot Gun” by Junior Walker and the Allstars, “Survive” by Gloria Gaynor and “Love Child” by Diana Ross and the Supremes. I also love Michael Jackson’s music and recently covered “Black & White.”

10. Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Five years from now, I hope to be performing music for fans all over the world.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

Stevie Wonder

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Too much to list here. There’s exclusive behind-the-scenes footage from the “Believe (Power of Love)” music video shoot, as well as other goodies like a dance remix of “Believe,” which I will be releasing soon. I also will be releasing a new single at the top of the year. Everything is building up for the release of my debut album, Rough & Fancy, in March 2013.

Links
taquitathorns.com
facebook.com/TaQuitaThorns
twitter.com/TaQuitaThorns

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Blues DozenQ Features Front page Funk Interviews Music Pop Soul Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Hot Feet

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series DozenQ 2

Hot Feet’s music lives and breathes in the countryside. ‘Wood House’ was written in a small cabin on the east coast of Sweden and recorded in a remote studio in the Scottish Highlands, only accessible by boat. The five songs are set, however, in the Cotswolds where Marianne (vocals) tends to goats and sheep when she’s not playing music, and Lachlan (bass) builds dry stonewalls. The band draw together a diverse range of musical influences including delta blues, sixties folk and world rhythms. Clamorous in places, delicate in others; sometimes offering raucous, earthy uproar and a wistful, yearning narrative within the very same song. The EP ranges from stomping gallops to tender ballads, and has been lovingly and impressively produced by Pete Roe, long-time side-man of Laura Marling and a gifted songwriter in his own right.

Hot Feet Are: Marianne Parrish – vocals, Jack Page – guitar,  Rob Pemberton – drums,  Lachlan McLellan – bass

01 How did you get started in music?

We’ve all been playing music in one form or other from a very young age. Coming from musical families definitely encouraged this through our early school years and then onwards.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Our parent’s records were some of the first influences we had, and by the time we met we had all come from quite different musical backgrounds. Since then our tastes have merged into the sounds we find ourselves making today.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Our earliest influences as a band were artists like Fairport Convention, Pentangle, Bert Jansch and Davy Graham… we found ourselves often looking to the past for inspiration. These days we’re trying harder to keep tabs on new sounds coming from all over the world and incorporate these colours and rhythmic ideas into our music where we can. As for who we despise, well that’s quite a strong word! We’ll keep our friends close and our enemies closer!

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

We’re very lucky that our hometown, Stroud, is a very vibrant  and artistic community with beautiful surroundings, where the people and places provide us with a lot of inspiration to work with.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We’ve phased out a lot of the acrobatics in our live show due to health and safety restrictions. The circus animals and magic tricks also had to go. These days you can expect strong grooves, flashy fingerstyle guitar playing and lots more vocal harmonies than before. And maybe some baaaa-d sheep jokes!

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Songs often start with a riff or vocal melody and build up from there. The lyrics deal with all sorts of topics, a lot of which are personal to Marianne but could be applicable many. Nature is a common theme, often used as a sort of looking glass through which these personal situations can be perceived.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

What started out quite delicate and rooted in the folk tradition has now got louder, bassier, boomier. Bigger amps and bigger drums have developed our music into something much more varied, and opened opportunities for a fuller sound. We still keep some of the softer songs in our set though, and there will always be room for them.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Getting our first record done. The process from start to finish was a good challenge, and probably the most exciting and rewarding stage of our musical careers so far.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We used to play a few covers when we started out, our favorite was definitely King of The Swingers from the Jungle Book!

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Who knows. We enjoy playing music together so hopefully still doing that. Hopefully we’ll have our own band van by then!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

We love the idea of an international collaboration somewhere along the line. We’ve all been listening to a band called Tinariwen at the moment, from Mali. A band like that would be cool to work with.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Hopefully it wont be too long until we’re back in the studio and we’ll be touring this year as well as playing some festivals over the summer. Look out for Jack’s own hand-made guitar that he should finish before then, and couple of new instruments on the stage!

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Folk Front page Indie Interviews Music Picks Tags:, ,
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