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Bob Meyer (Bob’s Folk Show) talks to Eyeplug

01. How did you get started in music?

That’s a hard one!!! Playing music? I was in a band with some friends when I was about 13, I played the drums we were called the Streatham Commoners we never gigged in fact! I can’t remember ever playing any songs! We must have been just one of those mid 70’s experimental garage bands that never made it.

Before that I did have two guitar lessons at school but like most of my school days I properly bunked off the third lesson and being left handed was always a problem as they wanted me to play right handed! The fascist swine’s!!! My older brother has been playing guitar since he was very young so I did play about with his guitar a bit and that’s when I started to play upside down!

Then about ten years later in the mid 80’s I started playing the Blues Harp. But that didn’t last long and I gave up.

Thinking about it I did hang round a rehearsal room and recording studio in Streatham in the late 70’s early 80’s! The Orchestra Pit was under Streatham railway station and my mate’s punk band Dead Clergy rehearsed there most Friday nights so I would go and watch. They were very loud and very punk and that had a big affect on a young me, growing up in dark, dank Thatcher’s London.

Dead Clergy’s guitar player was Les (Fruit Bat) Carter who went on to form Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine so I was hanging round with some real talent at the tender age of 14.

It wasn’t till I was about 33 that I picked up a guitar again when I was round my friend’s house and as usual I picked it up upside down, I played about a bit with it and thought, yes Sir I must buy me a guitar! So the next day I went to Cash Converters on Streatham Hill and bought an old Marlin Classical guitar for £43.00. Then I got a book on “How to play a guitar” turned the book upside down and taught my self some chords! I got bored of that very quickly so I just started messing about with different tunings etc and made the rest up! I still don’t know any chords I still don’t know what notes I’m playing and still can’t play anyone else’s music so as a musician I’m a fraud (laughs).

It must have been with in a few months I had made up enough songs to go and do an open mic in Clapham, Seven years later I had a record deal.

02. Where did your Folk direction stem from?

I don’t think I have any direction at all! I have always been too Blues for the “folk” music fans and to folk for the Blues fans, I just think of what I do as music, if you like it good ,if you don’t there is nothing I can do to make you like it. Too much is made of putting labels on Art and I’m to old to care anymore. (Laughs out loud)

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

Bowie, Son House, Blind Willie Johnson, Bjork, Al Bowlly, Kurt Vonnegut, Marcel Duchamp, Dennis Wilson, William Blake, Butthole Surfers and life, love, death and hate.

04. What inspires you to create your current type of songs and you general sound?

To tell you the truth I have had a writers block for about five years, so I’m just punting my old songs around and the fact that I have hardly gigged in the last three years, means it’s like starting over again for me in a way!

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

A fat old middle-aged man singing and playing the guitar very badly! (laughs to himself) Well I have never really done songs! I much prefer to play straight through without stopping! I have never liked talking to the audiences and this is not some kind of me being cool, I’m just very nervous when I’m playing, I get very bad stage fright and since I stopped getting drunk and doing drugs, it’s worse than ever! So I just like to get on stage play for twenty-five minuets or so say thanks and leave! But when I play and it goes well and I get lost in what I’m doing and I may go to that place where some Artists go when they hit the spot and an audience are getting it and enjoying it, they are the good times. Joe Cushley the renounced music writer, promoter, manager and DJ once said my “playing is like a stream of consciousness”  – I say it’s very well rehearsed improvisation.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Not written anything for years and I never had a formula for song writing, it was just sit around have a drink and a smoke and tinker about. Some tunes and lyrics just pop in to my brain and I record them there and then and go back years later and try to remember how to play them.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

After I started playing the guitar and singing I started playing about with old keyboards and multi-track recorders and any other old junky type of old skool sound making stuff I could get my hands on, my friend described it as ‘soundscapes’. I did a home-made album of this stuff and had one of the tracks was put on a compilation album too. But I soon got bored and went back to just doing gigs with my guitar and my songs.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

Not a clue! I don’t look at life like that, if I want to do something I put my heart and soul in to it, if it works I’m happy if it fails I move on.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

I can’t play anyone else music so covering is a bit hard!

10. Tell us about your Radio work?

I did Bob’s Folk Show live on Radio Wey for about three years and after eighteen months it was repeated on Folk Radio UK.

I have been told that the show was one of the best Folk, Roots and Acoustic radio shows in the UK and I certainly had some great live sessions and discovered some great music and some artists (I could now make a list of the great artists who I played first or who played live on my show first, but they know who they are) I only stopped doing the show due to illness in my family and it was getting on my tits being ignored by other “Folk DJ’s”. And I think the straw that broke my back was being ignored by Richard Digance.

I would have gone back to Radio Wey but they would only have me back on their terms and what they wanted from me, I could never do!

I have recently done a pilot show for an FM station in London and I hope to get back on air very soon with Bob Meyer’s Old Time Radio Show playing music mainly from the 1920’s and 30’s, pre-war blues and mountain music, you know the kind of thing. Thinking about if I ever write my life story I could call it “Being Ignored by Richard Digance (ho ho ho).

11. You also are involved in various Events and Promotions?

Yes, I have put on a few gigs and they have been great all of them sold out and everyone said they had a good old time and I put on The London Folk and Roots Festival in 2012 with some good friends and I’m putting it on again this year (2014). In 2012 we put on about thirty acts with Michele from The Magic Numbers heading the bill it was a great day/night. This year there will only be half the acts, but it will be a who’s who of great talent and I really can’t wait.

12. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Doing my same day job (driving a pickup truck) trying to get a paid job as a radio broadcaster, doing a few gigs here and there and just glad to be alive.

13. Who would you most like to record with?

Bjork.

14. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

The unexpected (boom! boom!)

Web links
soundcloud.com/bobsfolkshow
bobmeyer.bandcamp.com
twitter.com/13bobmeyer
facebook.com/bobmeyershow

London Folk & Roots Festival 2012
watch-the-london-folk-and-roots-festival-film/

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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February 4, 2014 By : Category : Eyeplugs Features Folk Front page Interviews Picks Tags:, , , ,
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Bob Meyer interviews Josienne Clarke

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Bob Meyer's Folk Companion

Anyone who tunes in to my radio show will know my favourite modern female folk singer/songwriter is Josienne Clarke. Josienne has already been on my show three times and will be on again later in the year.

I recently went to the pub with her for a chat, a beer and an apple juice (hers, not mine) – and I have to say, it’s always a pleasure to be in her company – she is good folk.

I hear you have recorded a new trad albumWhen is it coming out?

Like almost all projects, we undertake slightly later than we originally hoped – however, it should be out and purchasable in August. It’s called The Seas Are Deep and it is an eight-track album of exclusively traditional folk songs. When we released our Album One Light Is Gone, in September 2010 a few people were disappointed that we didn’t include any traditional songs on it as we are known for playing them live. When we started work on OLIG we had 21 original songs and that was eventually cut to 14 – we just didn’t have room for the trads. Also, though we love traditional folk songs, we didn’t want to be categorized as purely folk artists. We write music and very often it happens to be consistent with the folk idiom, but we do not limit ourselves to that alone. We are ‘a little bit country’, you know!

Tell me a bit about your singing – Did you sing as a child? When did you realize you could sing, and what was the first song you remember singing?

My family all sing in one form or another – though my mother claims to be tone-deaf, she is still a committed participant in a sing-along. My earliest memory of singing was aged three with my sister (two-and-three-quarter years older) she would learn songs at school and come home and teach them to me. The first one, I believe, was a song called ‘Cauliflower’s Fluffy’, which was a song about vegetables. My father played guitar and sang at home from as early as I can remember – though not professionally. It was a very regular activity in our house for our dad to set up in the kitchen with his guitar and my sister and I would sing along. Singing just the tune at first, and as we got older the harmonizing would become more elaborate, it was a typical Saturday afternoon in our house for years. Aged 12 I went to secondary school and joined all the choirs. Luckily, it was a standard comprehensive school and had no audition process and though I was two years too young I was even allowed to join the chamber choir. All of my break times, evenings and weekends were spent in the music block, singing.

Where did you meet you partner in rhyme (Ben Walker)?

Ben was in an indie band when I met him – A friend of mine was mixing tracks for their EP and Ben mentioned that he was looking for some more acoustic projects. On seeing him wrap his tendrils round my friend Martin’s acoustic I was certain I wanted him for my project. That was about three years ago, and since then neither of us have questioned the compatibility of our skills. Ben is not only a fantastic guitarist he also has a real skill for arrangement. All the string writing on One Light Is Gone is Ben’s work, and most of the arrangement on The Seas Are Deep is down to him.

Josienne Clarke - 'One Light Is Gone'

Your album, One Light Is Gone, is a great record – What was the inspiration behind it?

Well, the album took us the best part of a year to produce; the producer Ben Lloyd was on tour with Frank Turner and would only be available for a week at a time before going off on tour again. This actually turned out to be a great blessing as each recording session we would do three or four songs at most and then have a month or so to listen over and make changes to them. I feel this process added to the overall unity and cohesion of the album. We wanted an album that represented what Ben and I sound like live, and I feel that that was achieved really well in the end. The album is largely melancholy in atmosphere and that is what Ben and I do best – but with a bit of love and hope thrown in for good measure.

What have been your best and worst gigs?

Two gigs spring to mind as our best: Last October we went down to Cornwall to play a gig supporting All The Fires at The Poly, in Falmouth. It is a great venue – a good size with great sound and All The Fires are a brilliant band to do support for. The other would be supporting Ric Sanders (of Fairport Convention) at The Green Note in Camden .Obviously, it’s always a great honour to play with someone of Ric’s musical caliber, but added to that, he was a really nice and funny guy, too. 

In terms of worst gigs we have been fairly lucky and most are a joy and a pleasure. However, we did have one horrific gig at Proud Gallery in Camden. When we arrived, there was no one to run the PA, and we basically had to do our own sound Ben was trying to play the guitar and EQ at the same time. Added to that, there was a full band playing in the room next door and the noise from the drum-kit could be heard quite loudly in our room, we could barely hear what we were playing, but that may have been a blessing!

What music do you listen to, and who inspires you?

The music I listen to is very folk and country based, on my regular playlist are (of course) Fairport Convention, Joan Baez, Gillian Welch, Nick Drake, Kings Of Convenience, Pete Greenwood and Beirut, to name but a few. In songwriting terms, the people who have influenced me the most might not be the most obvious. Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac’s song ‘Man of The World’ was one of the first songs to really move me – I must have been less than ten when I first heard it. The lyrics are honest and sad in the same way I later found Nick Drake’s music to be. Another early songwriting influence was Don Maclean’s ‘Empty Chairs’ for the same reasons. I think this early exposure to the heady pleasure of melancholy has had a massive effect on how I later came to approach songwriting.

What are your plans for your musical life?

My first response to this question was, ‘Pah … There’s no point making plans in this fickle bloody business, it’ll chew you up and spit you out other side before you have a chance to consult your plans.’ But in all seriousness I don’t really know what lies ahead for us. We will continue to write, we already have enough for a second album (though no plans to release one just yet) and plenty of gigs planned for the coming year. We will be going to France, Germany and The Netherlands at some stage and we are currently organizing a mini-tour of the UK. We will write until we are asked to stop writing, go where people want to hear us and carry on singing till we run out of air in our lungs.

Josienne Clarke’s Web Site

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Eyeplugs Features Front page Interviews Tags:, , , , ,
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Bob Meyer’s Folk Companion – 4 July

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Bob Meyer's Folk Companion

Juniper Leaf

 

I love it when an album gets stuck in my head like an ear worm burrowing it’s self into my every waking moment – sometimes they even get into my dreams. Juniper Leaf’s album Broom, Briars, Torches from the Fire has done this to me in a big way – I can’t stop playing it and singing it! Rupert Brown’s voice is so unique but so familiar, I feel as if  it takes me back to somewhere, but I can’t remember where and maybe I never will. Musically, Juniper Leaf will take you from traditional British folk to folk rock/surf, if you know what I mean! Sometimes this can be very scary – like being stuck on a fairground ride with the music hurting your spinning ears, but in a macabre way you know you want to hear more and more. The tracks that I love the most are ‘Witch’s Book’, ‘Bushes and Briars’, and the outstanding ‘Lighthouse’.

Broom, Briars, Torches from the Fire is available on Singaround Records

Juniper Leaf on MySpace

Check out the album HERE

Nina Walsh

I’m so glad that Nina Walsh has a track on her album Bright Lights and Filthy Nights called ‘Industrial Folk’, because that’s a great way of describing some of the tracks on the new disc. Nina has managed to create a very warm modern folk record that reminds me of nothing else. I’m sure a lot of old folk fans would be up in arms over Nina’s use of electric sounds in her folk soundscapes, but this is the modern world and some folkies need to move on. In years to come, musicians like Nina will be recognised as having recorded and performed during a great moment in the world of folk music.

This is a beautifully crafted album, with so many elements that you can miss them even on the ninth or nineteenth listen. Don’t get me wrong however, as there are plenty of traditional instruments being used here – and even a pedal bin! Buy this record and you will soon fall for Nina Walsh’s sounds. The standout tracks include ‘Bright Lights and Filthy Nights’, ‘Industrial Folk’, and ‘Goodnight My Sweet’ – a track that demands to be played until its very end as it runs on into some more great sounds.

Bright Lights and Filthy Nights is available on Malicious Damage Records

Nina Walsh’s official website

Mark Harrison

 

Mark Harrison has some fine friends playing with him on his toe-tapping, head-swaying debut album, Watching The Parade. If you fancy tapping your toes, swaying your head and tuning in to some great acoustic blues that aren’t trying to be something they’re not, then this album is for you. Mark has a sweet voice and his guitar playing is as fine as anyone who came out of the Delta in the 1920’s.

There are so many blues players around singing like Otto Man from The Simpsons that it’s such a relief to hear a fresh British blues man who’s simply being himself, and that’s what makes this such a lovely record, along with the sheer musical talent of Mark and his band. His songs pull you into a space that’s hard to define, but wherever it is, it’s a real and true place that Mark has spent plenty of time in. If you like cowboy hats and strats blues don’t buy this album, but if you like honesty you will love it. The disc’s outstanding tracks include ‘Easy Does It Now’, ‘5000 Days’, and ‘Primrose Hill Street Blues’.

Mark Harrison on MySpace

Check out Watching The Parade HERE

Bob’s Folk Show, Tuesdays 9pm www.radiowey.co.uk

www.facebook.com/bobsfolkshow

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Blues Folk Music Tags:, , , ,
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Bob Meyer’s Folk Companion – 25 June

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Bob Meyer's Folk Companion

Pete Greenwood

I first met Pete about five years ago at the Half Moon pub in Hearn Hill, South London –Where we were both on the same bill. As usual, we had a lot of time to kill before the gig got started, so I sat with Pete and bored him with my life story. I soon found out that Pete was far more interesting then I am!

Pete was born and bred in Leeds and moved down to London in 2002 and started doing a degree course in music at Goldsmiths University. Shortly after, he was stopped in his tracks by an offer to tour the world with the band Mojave 3 – which he accepted, later going on to tour Europe with Starsailor and the UK with Loose State .

Pete’s musical craftsmanship rolls on to this day – He plays guitar in the See See who are getting a big following and a lot of critical acclaim – I plan to go and see then very soon. But it’s Pete solo work that really moves me, from the moment I saw him at the Half Moon

I thought this guy has something very special going on. He has great stage presence and oozes charisma, his songs are infused with a unique type of complex simplicity and are much more heart warming and valid than many of the more well known modern singer/songwriters we have foist upon us.

Pete Greenwood's debut album - Sirens

Sirens was Pete’s first album and I’m not ashamed to say I’m a bit in love with it, I find new elements in it every time I listen, and I have been playing it a lot. Sirens is on a par with any of the truly great albums by the likes of Nick Drake or John Martin. Pete’s guitar skills are right up there with the best of them too, and he also plays a wide range of instruments – more than you can shake a drum stick at!   

But it’s his vocals and lyrics that gets straight to my soul, with his unassuming Yorkshire tones that glide though you like an arrow straight to your heart and mind – this is music with deep meanings that are well worth tying to fathom out, although so far I have not been wholly successful.

I know that there is a new album in the pipeline and I’m now poised like an old dog waiting at the front door for his master to come home. I’m sure it will be as good as Sirens, as Pete is always advancing his music to greater heights, as I saw when he was on my radio show – Where he just blew my mind with his talent. I’m very glad to say he will be back on my show on 8th November.

The Spanish artist and philosopher Marta Bravo once said of Pete Greenwood, ‘The word of a Yorkshireman is worth half a cashew nut. Not much else.’ She may be wrong on that one!

Pete Greenwood on MySpace

Pete’s Label – Heavenly Recordings

Bob’s Folk Show Tuesday 9pm www.radiowey.co.uk

www.facebook.com/bobsfolkshow

photos by Paul Kelly

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Folk Music Tags:, , ,
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Bob Meyer’s Folk Companion –12 June

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Bob Meyer's Folk Companion

George Frakes

George Frakes has the best hair of anyone in the folk world! But don’t let his dandified, foppish ways fool you into thinking that he is all style and no substance. For, under his beautifully coiffured head there lies the brain of a rather fine songwriter who can sing and play the guitar with such style and emotion that even the most drunken punter in any folk club will stop what they are doing and watch him. He truly is a one off. His music drifts around you like a Dickensian smog, mysterious and, at times, very dark indeed.

George’s EP, Ghost of the Girl, is out now on iTunes and it finds him at a great point in his musical development. He will be playing live on my show on 2 August.

www.reverbnation.com/georgefrakes

The Cedars

 

I have been watching The Cedars for a few years now and they just get better and better. Their down-home bluegrass music is as true as anything you would have heard coming from the porch of mountain dwelling during the 1930s. They also possess an absolute gem in front woman Chattel Hill, whose Scottish brogue suits the music down to a tee – and the rest of the band are pretty hot too. They are one hell of a hard working band that plays all over the country, wooing audiences as they go, and now have a very large following. Their album, Little Copper Still, is due for release this year, I have had promo copy for some time and I don’t remember ever seeing or hearing another bluegrass country band in the UK that can come close to matching them. Buy their album when it comes out, but most of all go and see them live – you will not be disappointed.   

Their debut single ‘The Colour’ is out now and you can download it from iTunes.

www.thecedarsonline.com

Bob’s Folk Show, Tuesdays 9pm www.radiowey.co.uk

www.facebook.com/bobsfolkshow

Photos by: www.annabelverephotography.com

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Music Tags:, , ,
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The Lantern Society

Is the Lantern Society the finest folk club in London ? I would say so!

The Lantern Society is run by Jack Day and Benjamin Folke Thomas every first and third Thursday of the month at the Besty Trotwood in Farringdon London. Jack and Ben are singer songwriters and are both at the top of the tree when it comes to performing and songwriting.

Jack Day’s music always hits me to the core at full speed and his style of folk blues is seldom played in this country with such emotion or sheer talent. He is one hell of a guitar player too. Jack doesn’t just knock these songs out either – they are drawn from deep inside his musical soul. His live performances take you on a very passionate and mesmerising ride.

Benjamin Folke Thomas’ music always surprises anyone who hasn’t seen him play and sing before. His soulful, deep voice coupled together with very fine guitar playing and outstanding songwriting makes him my tip for folk stardom in the very near future. Ben also plays with a backing band and their 2010 mini-album has some stunning tracks on it, I would recommend anyone to buy it immediately.

In addition to the twice monthly folk club, The Lantern Society puts on special nights at the Betsey Trotwood when they invite some of the top folk talent in London to come and play. The highlight so far was having Romeo and Angela from the Magic Numbers top the bill – it was a great night, with a packed house.

The Betsey Trotwood is fast becoming one of the best live music venues in London and I must say the food and drink are excellent too as is the landlord.

The Betsey Trotwood, 56 Farringdon Road, City of London, EC1R 3BL (020 7253 4285)

Check out Benjamin Folke Thomas: www.benjaminfolkethomas.com/

Jack Day on MySpace: www.myspace.com/jackdaymusic

PHOTO CREDITS: ANNABEL VERE, KATE BRADY/NOTES FROM MT PLEASANT

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Music Tags:, , , ,
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Bob Meyer’s Folk Companion – 03 June

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Bob Meyer's Folk Companion

Good things are going on in the world of folk music – and when I say folk I speak of a broad church!

First, I’d better tell you who I am. I’m Bob Meyer – a guitar playing folk/blues singer songwriter signed to an old punk independent record label (Malicious Damage).  I also host Bob’s Folk Show on Radio Wey and I play the best folk, Americana, roots, blues, and acoustic music around. I have some of the best underground folk acts coming in and playing live.  Here are two of the best acts that I can recommend you go and see live or buy their albums:

Trent Miller

www.trent-miller.com

A dark brooding singer songwriter with a Byronic passion for hanging, drugs, and strong drink. His first album, Cerberus was the best album I have had sent in to my show so far.  His new disc, Welcome to Inferno Valley is due out in June – and is just as good, it’s growing on me more and more. He has played live on my show twice and will be back very soon.  His live performances can take your mind to crazy places.

Josienne Clarke

www.josienneclarke.co.uk

Josienne is a quintessential female folk singer/songwriter. She sings of love lost, and though some may think, ‘oh, that old chestnut’ – just wait until you hear her unique levels of feeling and passion; they will melt the coldest heart. Her voice is outstanding and she is truly one of the best female singers in the UK at the moment. Josienne has also been on my show and to sit five feet away from her when she sings blows my mind every time. (She will be live on my show again on 14 June).

Josienne is accompanied on various stringed instruments by Ben Walker who is one of the finest guitar players I have ever seen. So go and see them live or buy Josienne’s  great album One Light Is Gone.

Bob’s Folk Show Tuesday 9pm www.radiowey.co.uk

www.facebook.com/bobsfolkshow

PHOTO CREDIT: ANNABEL VERE

Folky Bob

Bob is EYEPLUG’s folk expert, he hosts ‘Bob’s Folk Show’ on Radio Wey, every Tuesday from 9-11pm – there you can catch everything from pre-war blues, to roots and acoustic singer songwriters and he also has many great live acts booked for upcoming sets. If you think your music will suit his show please send your cd's to; Bob Meyer, Radio Wey Studio, St Peters, Chertsey, KT16 OPZ, or send an email!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, , ,
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