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SongCraft: Willow’s Song – Magnet (Paul Giovanni)

This entry is part 10 of 10 in the series Song Craft

Being the best-known song of the film, it is sometimes referred to as “The Wicker Man Song”, although the film contains many other songs. The film tells the story of an upright Christian police officer investigating the disappearance of a young girl, the search for whom leads him to a remote Scottish isle inhabited by pagans. While staying at the Green Man pub, Sergeant Howie (Edward Woodward) is roused from prayer by the landlord’s daughter Willow, played by (Britt Ekland), who sings this rather erotic ballad through the adjoining wall of their separate bedrooms. The song is an attempt to seduce Howie by alluding to Willow’s sensuality.

The music is played by the band Magnet. According to the film’s associate musical director Gary Carpenter, the screen version was sung by Rachel Verney (although some have believed that it was sung by the Scottish jazz singer Annie Ross). There are two different album versions of The Wicker Man soundtrack. The 1998 version released by Trunk Records features the film version of the song. The 2002 version released by Silva Screen features an alternate recording in which Lesley Mackie (who played Daisy in the film) sang to the same backing tracks.

According to Paul Giovanni, “The idea for the song was completely original with me — there was no indication of what it was to be in the script except a couple of lines of absolute filth” (sourced by screenwriter Anthony Shaffer from various anthologies of lyrics that would be appropriate to spring pagan festivals). “The main thing is in the rhythm, and we used all of the old twangy instruments in there”. One couplet in the song is adapted from a poem by George Peele, part of his play The Old Wives’ Tale (printed 1595). Another may be taken from a verse of the Elizabethan-period drinking song “Martin Said To His Man” (or may since have been added to it).

“Willow’s Song” was also the title of a song Shakespeare used in Othello.

 

Willow’s Song

“Heigh ho! Who is there?
No one but me, my dear.
Please come say, how do?
The things I’ll give to you.
By stroke as gentle as a feather
I’ll catch a rainbow from the sky
and tie the ends together.

Heigh ho! I am here.
Am I not young and fair?
Please come say, how do?
The things I’ll show to you.
Would you have a wond’rous sight?
The midday sun at midnight.

Fair maid, white and red,
comb you smooth and stroke your head.
How a maid can milk a bull!
And every stroke a bucketful.”

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Cinema Exotica Taboo Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: The Free Design – Love You

This entry is part 9 of 10 in the series Song Craft

The Free Design was a Delevan, New York-based vocal group playing jazzy pop music. Their music can be described as sunshine pop and baroque pop, which were pop music subgenres at the time, which later influenced the bands Stereo lab, Cornelius, Pizzicato Five, Beck and The High Llamas.

Love You

Give a little time for the child within you,
dont be afraid to be young and free.
Undo the locks and throw away the keys
and take off your shoes and socks, and run you.
La, la, la…

Give a little time for the child within you,
dont be afraid to be young and free.
Undo the locks and throw away the keys
and take off your shoes and socks, and run you.
La, la, la…

Run through the meadow and scare up the milking cows
Run down the beach kicking clouds of sand
Walk a windy weather day, feel your face blow away
Stop and listen: Love you.

Roll like a circus clown, put away your circus frown
Ride on a roller coaster upside down
Waltzing Matilda, Carey loves a kinkatchoo
Joey catch a kangaroo, hug you.

Dandylion, milkweed, silky on a sunny sky
Reach out and hitch a ride and float on by
Balloons down below catching colors of the rainbow
red, blue and yellow-green: I love you.

Bicycles, tricycles, ice cream candy
Lollypops, popsicles, licorice sticks
Solomon Grundy, Raggedy Andy
Tweedledum and Tweedledee, home free.

Cowboys and Indians, puppydogs and sandpails
Beachballs and baseballs and basketballs, too.
I love forget-me-nots, fluffernutters, sugarpops
Ill hug you and kiss you and love you
La, la, la… Love you.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Exotica Kitsch Pop Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Fred Neil – Dolphins

This entry is part 8 of 10 in the series Song Craft

Famously reclusive, he was an influential figure on the 1960s New York folk scene, and was occasionally backed by the young Bob Dylan on harmonica at the all-night Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village.

He took flight almost from the day Harry Nilsson turned his song, Everybody’s Talkin’ into a global hit in 1970, following its use as the theme of the Dustin Hoffman-Jon Voight movie Midnight Cowboy (1969).

Neil rarely gave interviews, could not stomach fame, and appeared repulsed at the success of his song, a disdainful commentary on human alienation in public life. In fact, it had already appeared on Neil’s 1966 solo album, alongside another song, The Dolphins, which reflected his fascination with mammals.

Unimpressed by the trappings of fame, and with no interest in exploiting the opportunities offered by his hit, Neil had withdrawn by 1971 to set up a dolphin rescue project in Florida with marine biologist Richard O’Barry, who trained the dolphins for the television series Flipper. He refused all attempts to persuade him into a comeback, and devoted the rest of his life to protecting dolphins.

Even in the 1960s, he was a fiercely private character. Born in St Petersburg, Florida, he first came to attention in 1956 playing guitar with Buddy Holly, for whom he wrote the single, Modern Don Juan, before Holly cracked the charts. He also wrote Candy Man, the B-side of Roy Orbison’s 1961 hit, Crying.

Dolphins

Well sometimes I think about;
Saturday’s child;
And all about the times;
We were running wild,

I’ve been a searching, for the dolphins, in the sea,
Ah but sometimes I wonder, do you ever think of me

Well this old world may never change
Not the way it’s been
And all our ways of war
Just can’t change it back again

I’ve been a searching for the dolphins in the sea
Ah but sometimes I wonder do you ever, ever think of me

Well Lord, I’m not the one to tell;
This old world how to get along
I only know that peace will come
When all our hate is gone

I’ve been a searching, for the dolphins in the sea
Ah but sometimes I wonder do you ever, ever think of me?

Oh this old world will never change
Ah this old world will never change
Ah this old world, will never change
Never change

 

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Anne Briggs – Blackwaterside

This entry is part 7 of 10 in the series Song Craft

In the annals of pop and folk music, there are few sagas stranger than that of Anne Briggs. An awesomely talented singer of traditional English folk music, possessing of as pure and breathtakingly beautiful a voice as one could hope to have, she was the single most important influence on a group of female British folk singers that includes Sandy Denny, Maddy Prior, June Tabor, and Linda Thompson.

Anne Briggs – Blackwaterside

One morning fair to take the air
Down by Blackwater side.
‘Twas in gazing all, all around me
‘Twas the Irish lad I spied.

All through the first part of the night
Well, we lay in sport and play,
Then this young man he arose and he gathered his clothes,
He said, “Fare thee well today.”

Well, that’s not the promise that you gave to me
When first you lay on my bed,
You could make me believe with your lying tongue
That the sun rose in the west.

Then go home, go home, to your father’s garden,
You go home and weep your fill.
And you think of your own misfortune
That you brought with your wanton will.

For there’s not a girl in this whole wide world
As easily led as I,
Sure it’s fishes they’ll fly and the seas run dry,
‘Tis then you’ll marry I.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Nick Drake – Way To Blue

This entry is part 6 of 10 in the series Song Craft

‘Nick was in some strange way out of time. When you were with him, you always had a sad feeling of him being born in the wrong century. If he would have lived in the 17th Century, at the Elizabethan Court, together with composers like Dowland or William Byrd, he would have been alright. Nick was elegant, honest, a lost romantic – and at the same time so cool. In brief: the perfect Elizabethan.’

Robert Kirby, a Cambridge friend of Nick’s who orchestrated his first 2 albums!

Way To Blue

Don’t you have a word to show what may be done
Have you never heard a way to find the sun
Tell me all that you may know
Show me what you have to show
Won’t you come and say
If you know the way to blue

Have you seen the land living by the breeze
Can you understand a light among the trees
Tell me all that you may know
Show me what you have to show
Tell us all today
If you know the way to blue?

Look through time and find your rhyme
Tell us what you find
We will wait
At your gate
Hoping like the blind

Can you now recall all that you have known
Will you never fall
When the light has flown
Tell me all that you may know
Show me what you have to show
Won’t you come and say
If you know the way to blue?

 

 

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Dr. John – Such a Night

This entry is part 5 of 10 in the series Song Craft

Dr. John, or Mac Rebennack as known to friends and family, is universally celebrated as the living embodiment of the rich musical heritage exclusive to New Orleans. His very colorful musical career began in the 1950s when he wrote and played guitar on some of the greatest records to come out of the Crescent City, including recordings by Professor Longhair, Art Neville, Joe Tex and Frankie Ford. A notorious gun incident forced the artist to give up the guitar and concentrate on organ and piano. Further trouble at home sent Dr. John west in the 1960s, where he continued to be in demand as a session musician, playing on records by Sonny and Cher, Van Morrison and Aretha Franklin to name a few. He also launched his solo career, developing the charismatic persona of Dr. John The Night Tripper. Adorned with voodoo charms and regalia, a legend was born with his breakthrough 1968 album Gris-gris, which established his unique blend of voodoo mysticism, funk, rhythm & blues, psychedelic rock and Creole roots.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Soul Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Sandy Denny – Who Knows Where The Time Goes?

This entry is part 4 of 10 in the series Song Craft

Sandy was born Alexandra Elene Maclean Denny in Wimbledon on 6th January 1947. Music was an important part of her younger years and learned to play the guitar at an early age, as well as playing piano and singing in the school choir. While Sandy was studying at College to be a nurse she established an early reputation in the popular London folk clubs such as Les Cousins, Bunjies and the Scots Hoose. Her repertoire at the time drew mainly on the folk tradition and the work of newly emerging singer-songwriters like Bob Dylan and Tom Paxton, but Sandy was also tentatively starting to write her own material. In less than a year she was getting regular work and decided to leave college to pursue a career in music.

Who knows where the time goes?
Across the evening sky, all the birds are leaving
But how can they know it's time for them to go?
Before the winter fire, I will still be dreaming
I have no thought of time

For who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

Sad, deserted shore, your fickle friends are leaving
Ah, but then you know it's time for them to go
But I will still be here, I have no thought of leaving
I do not count the time

For who knows where the time goes?
Who knows where the time goes?

And I am not alone while my love is near me
I know it will be so until it's time to go
So come the storms of winter and then the birds in spring again
I have no fear of time

For who knows how my love grows?
And who knows where the time goes?

(Copyright © 1967 Sonet Music)

 

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Wizz Jones – Happiness Was Free

This entry is part 3 of 10 in the series Song Craft

Born Raymond Ronald Jones in 1939, Wizz began his musical career in 1958, leading a Country and Skiffle band in his home town of Croydon. Inspired by Big Bill Broonzy, Rambling Jack Elliot, Alexis Korner and Ewan MacColl, Wizz learnt his craft in the coffee bars around London’s Soho from the likes of Davy Graham and Long John Baldry.

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Terry Callier – Dancing Girl

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series Song Craft

One of Chicago’s (Northside) greatest treasures who crafted the New Folk-Soul Sound over a long and still proud career.

Dancing Girl

I saw a dream last night
bright like a falling star.
And the sources of light,
seemed so near,
yet so far.
I thought i was in flight,
out where the planets are.
Moving between day and night.
Hear am I,
there you are.
Follow the dancing girl,
vision and embrace.
Such an entrancing girl,
she moves with such rhythm and grace.
Who can she be?
Follow the dancing girl,
go to the quiet place.
Here in the weary world,
somewhere between time and space.
We shall be free.

Each of us is born alone.
Well welcome to the twilight zone.
You can leave with only what you bring.
Things we cannot see appear.
Singing songs we cannot hear.
An everything is surely everything.
Meanwhile in the ghettos dust and gloom.
Bird is blowin in his room.
All those notes(x3)
wont take the pain away.
And you’ll surely come to harm,
with that needle all up in your arm.
And dope will never turn the night to day.

Just a little further down the line.
Baby sister its these streets at night.
I say the wind blows chilly,
And the women need new shoes.

So just tell her,
tell her what you wanna do.
boogie, bop or boogalo?
I said tell her what you wanna do
boogie, bop or boogaloo?
I said tell her, tell her
what you wanna do.
Boogie, bop or boogaloo?

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Folk Soul Tags:, ,
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SongCraft: Tim Buckley – Song to the Siren

This entry is part 1 of 10 in the series Song Craft

A Fred Neil Composition but elegantly visited by Tim Buckley (yes son of Jeff).

Long afloat on shipless oceans
I did all my best to smile
‘Til your singing eyes and fingers
Drew me loving to your isle
And you sang
Sail to me, sail to me
Let me enfold you
Here I am, here I am
Waiting to hold you

Did I dream you dreamed about me ?
Were you hare when I was fox ?
Now my foolish boat is leaning
Broken lovelorn on your rocks
For you sing
‘Touch me not, touch me not
Come back tomorrow
Oh my heart, oh my heart
Shies from the sorrow’

I am puzzled as the oyster
I am troubled as the tide
Should I stand amid your breakers ?
Or should I lie with death my bride ?
Hear me sing
‘Swim to me, swim to me
Let me enfold you
Here I am, here I am
Waiting to hold you’

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Folk Tags:, ,
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