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DozenQ – Bobby John

Bobby John is an award-winning Montreal based singer/songwriter signed to one of Quebec’s largest and most respected publishers; Bloc Notes Music. As an artist, he’s opened for acts such as Bon Jovi, The Trews, Sick Puppies and Bobby Bazini. His debut single, ‘Strong’, remained on the official Palmares Radio charts for 30 weeks with numerous chart positions including on Rythme FM; Quebec’s largest radio network. As a songwriter, he’s travelled across the country and in Europe writing with chart topping artists and is regularly writing for singers from Star Academie, La Voix (The Voice) and The Next Star. Recent cuts include the #1 single ‘Sortir de l’Ombre’ by Olivier Dion, and the official theme song to the PanAm games, ‘Together We Are One’ performed by platinum selling artist Serena Ryder which was included in a Cirque du Soleil performance and synced to a daily fireworks display during the games. Currently, Bobby John is in studio writing and working on his debut album while lining up to release his
follow-up single.

01. How did you get started in music?

I had music around growing up but my first real glimpse of wanting to be a part of it was when I was at my cousin’s place when I must have been 11 or so. He’s an insanely talented, classically trained pianist and at the time, had an acoustic guitar that he messed around with. He started playing riffs from one of my favourite bands, Nirvana, and I lost my mind. He was patient enough to teach me the opening riff of ‘Come As You Are’. It wasn’t the tightest guitar playing but after a little bit, I was somewhat playing along to the song that we had looping in the background. It felt out of this world. It was as if someone just flicked on a switch that immediately got bolted into place. Music became all I talked about. Santa got me a guitar that Christmas and I haven’t put one down since.

02 . Where did your direction come from?

Musically, I followed what made me feel something along the way. I filtered out anyone negative or who had a ‘me, myself and I’ attitude, no matter how talented. I surrounded myself with artists and songwriters who I looked up to from a creative stand point, to work ethic and just general vibe.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

I went through a bunch of phases. Started with Green Day, Offspring and Nirvana. Since I played guitar and was in a bunch of rock bands during high school, Google searches like ‘Best Guitar Solos of all Time’ got me into a metal phase with Metallica, Pantera, Megadeth, In Flames and Dream Theatre. Started singing way more and it led me to artists like Matchbox 20, Rob Thomas, Michael Jackson, Bon Jovi, Coldplay and Jason Mraz. When I got into songwriting, I got into loads of stuff Max Martin was involved with and just kept up to date with what’s going on with the charts and on radio. Last little while, big fan of everything from Mumford and Sons, SIA, Katy Perry, Fallout Boy, Ed Sheeran, Halsey, you name it. When I start drifting away from what I feel is solid songwriting, or nothing really hits me, I take a step back to appreciate some Michael Jackson as a
reset button.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Among many things, music tends to be one of my biggest inspirations. Those songs that I have on repeat for days that when stripped down to just one instrument and a vocal, are just as phenomenally good or even better. Those singers that have my full attention from start to end of a song and make every line believable. Those moments live or on a record where a song has my jaw dropped from an insane performance or lyric. Seeing and hearing it done right with undeniable music at the core inspires me to pick up a guitar, write and sing more, aim to be better and not be afraid to put the hours in or start over from scratch if something isn’t good enough.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

Expect a high energy, bare boned show. It’s me and my acoustic guitar with the occasional loop station pedal. Nothing to hide behind. No pre recorded back tracks. Just the raw music. Might make mistakes cause I’ll probably try something new that wasn’t rehearsed. I’ll bring you into what the songs are about. By the end, you’ll know me as if we’ve been talking for hours.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Since I’m signed to a publishing company (Bloc Notes Music publishing), I’ve been lucky enough to write with and for loads of artists. I’m probably writing anywhere from 50-100 songs a year. I don’t really have a set process anymore. I’ve written songs while driving, in the middle of watching a movie, in a room with 5 other writers and insanely tight deadlines, with a melody first, with a catch phrase first, with a riff, a bass line, with nothing but a beat I make by hitting random things in a room, even in dreams where I wake up from and hurry to grab my phone to mumble the little I remember of them while trying not to wake my wife up, you name it. As far as themes and subjects, I like to write about things that happened to either me or someone near me. They come from a real place. Be it a positive moment, or a feeling someone is experiencing. I try to get the song to tell that story and convey those feelings both musically and lyrically.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

When I started, I was a rock guy. I had my Gibson Les Paul guitar, a Mesa Boogie half stack that weighed a ton to carry around, had the amps blasting and was running around on stage getting people jumping and moving. Songwriting and ‘hooks’ were always important to me. Not much has changed outside of appreciating solid songwriting even more and finding a way to bring the same energy live alone with an acoustic guitar rather than a rock band and 2
vans of gear.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

Getting into the groove of making a living with music was the biggest challenge. I was doing it part-time for so long. I saved up money from side jobs and when I had enough to live for a few months, I quit everything ‘non musical’ I was doing and focused strictly on music. Was a tad stressful especially the first year or two but it’s been continuously getting better with every year. I’m not making millions but I’m doing what I love everyday and paying my bills mostly on time, lol.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

I’ve done quite a few covers on YouTube already but one I haven’t tackled yet would be ‘Messenger’ which I originally discovered through the Tea Party but was written by Daniel Lanois. I was a very musical / melody kind of guy but this was the first lyric from a song that caught my attention enough to make me read, re-read, picture a story and really feel something even if the music was taken away.

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

In studio writing / recording my third album while touring and promoting my second album both around here and abroad. I’m playing live and songwriting more than ever.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

If time travel were possible, Michael Jackson, otherwise, SIA. Amazing songwriter and incredible vocals.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Working harder than ever with my production and often co-writer, Eric Collard, my publishing team Bloc Notes and amazing record label Mungo Park Records to bring the project to the next level. I feel lucky and thankful that they’ve had my back thus far. We are also thankful to have received local support in Montreal from radio and music video stations with my debut single that got us on the charts for over 30 weeks. I’m planning to continue building my story locally, releasing a new single and video while continuing to write and work on my album. The near future holds a lot more live shows both local and in surrounding areas, slowly making my way below the border as well. A few songwriting trips are in the works to hit up Toronto a bunch more and adding New York and Nashville this year to the list. Basically, non stop hustle with lots of music coming in the next while 🙂

Web Links:

Youtube Links:

Official Debut Music Video for single – ‘Strong’ 
Making of the EP 
Cover – Fallout Boy – Light em Up 

Web Links:

www.BobbyJohnsPage.com
www.soundcloud.com/BobbyJohnMusic
www.youtube.com/c/BobbyJohnMusic
www.twitter.com/BobbyJohnTweets
www.facebook.com/BobbyJohnsPage
Instagram @BobbyJohnsInsta

Links to buy current single:

Single – itunes.apple.com/ca/album/strong-single
EP – itunes.apple.com/ca/album/strong-ep

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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April 10, 2016 By : Category : DozenQ Front page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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DozenQ – Christopher Bell

Cellist and multi-instrumentalist Christopher Bell blends the classical and pop worlds. Clarinet, acoustic guitar, beat boxing and cello recorded live into dense soundscapes. Hip hop beats, gentle fugues, jazz and blues all wrapped up into his own brand of Quirky Pop. For fans of Paul Simon and Andrew Bird.

01. How did you get started in music?

I started as a drummer 20 years ago and switched over to cello.

02 .Where did your direction come from?

Checking out all sorts of different music and seeing how they could fit together.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

Randy Newman, Paul Simon, Andrew Bird.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I’ve started studying eastern classical music as well as getting more into jazz
as well.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

Having a lot of fun, maybe learning something, and seeing that classical instruments can be cool.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Usually i just take something that happened in my own life and exaggerate it out, make it happen to someone dumber.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Even though the songs can be based off real life, they’re less about me, and more about characters.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

My biggest challenge was learning how to put in the work to achieve this, I just had to canoe 550 miles! Really taught me how to do something big its just a day
at a time.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

There’s too many to count.

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Hopefully still playing.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

I would have loved to sit in on a session with Louis Armstrong, even if I was just playing the tambourine.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

New music in within the next year, after I finish the next semester back at college, excited to put all this new knowledge to work.

Web Links:

www.thechrisbell.com
christopherbell.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/thechrisbellcello
twitter.com/thechrisbell
www.youtube.com/user/silenthomerecords
soundcloud.com/thechrisbell/sets/rust

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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April 10, 2016 By : Category : Beats Blues DozenQ Front page Interviews Jazz Music Pop Tags:,
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DozenQ – Deadphonecalls

This entry is part 14 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

Max Cossu (alias Deadphonecalls) decided to start his own project a few years ago, but only released his first album Calls to the dead phone in 2014. After the two dance singles released along with Mel Project  –  Black Day (2001) and Whistle’s Song (2002), and after several years spent as a drummer, playing blues-rock-pop cover songs in various bands in Italy and Czech Republic, Max decided to devote himself entirely to the composition and the development of
his own project.

01. How did you get started in music?

I started to play and write  music ever since I was a teenager. I started to play drums at the age of 14, then, after few months of studies,
I had my first cover band!

02 .Where did your direction come from?

It’s difficult to say… For sure I hope to take the right direction in order to create great music!

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

I have so many and different influences  related with so many kinds of music (from rock to pop, passing through blues, dark and more…) . But Let’s say that my main background remains in the electro pop of the 80s.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Certainly, the sense of mystery and the unknown worlds.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

I started my project as a conceptual idea and honestly, I did’t plan yet any live activity. In any case,  I have my own idea of what should be a Deadphonecalls tour that is quite different from the typical idea of what a tour should be. I’m actually working also to develop this idea!

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

In this first album the main themes are death and incommunicability. But, in general, my inspiration can change in according to what I’m living in a specific moment. As I said before, I’m strongly attracted by the sense of  mystery, and it takes the first place when I have to find inspiration.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

At the beginning I was mainly focused in playing only cover songs. Then (as a composer) I’ve  started to produce Dance singles distributed by a large Italian label. And now I am focused on a creation of intimate sounds and atmospheres that match better with me and my music.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

My biggest challenge has been to continue in all these years to produce music and maintain a big passion for the things I do,  for the music I create and  for the music that I like to listen,  in spite of difficult and problems. So in this case I think that I won this challenge!

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

A few days ago I covered Loverman by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds,( you can find it on my youtube channel). I love so much this song because it’s so strong and shows the dark side of man. But there are more upcoming covers such as Here comes the rain again by Eurythmics , or Love is blindnessby U2 that will be available in few days…

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

I hope to be in the same mood I am now, and doing exactly what I am doing now… So composing and playing music, and thinking about the next project!

11. Who would you most like to record with?

There are so many great musicians and composers, impossible to say just one name!

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

In about 1 month (or maybe more) I’m planning the upcoming of my second single and my first solo album. Both (album and song) are titled
Calls to the dead phone.

Web Links:

facebook.com/deadphonecalls
twitter.com/DeadPhoneCalls
instagram.com/deadphonecalls

Link to buy the current single: deadphonecalls.com/music/

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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February 17, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Interviews Music Tags:, , , , ,
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DozenQ – Jack Jeffery

This entry is part 13 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

Virginia artist Jack Jeffery performs progressive and ambient music influenced by Pink Floyd, Alan Parsons, and Brian Eno. Other influences are John Lennon, The Beatles, The Moody Blues, Neil Young, Oasis, Emerson, Lake, & Palmer, and Kraftwerk.

Jack’s third album, Enlightened Horizon (2014) follows his critically-acclaimed second album The Constant That Remains (2012), and once again transports the listener through a compelling musical journey through ambient, psychedelic, electronic, acoustic, and folk rock soundscapes. Jack’s debut release, Passage to Agadir (2010), was likewise favorably received as a noteworthy and ambitious progressive rock release in the style of early Pink Floyd and Alan Parsons along with ambient Brian Eno-esque soundscapes. Jack’s music has been featured on radio and podcasts, and is available from CD Baby, iTunes, Amazon.com, and other online music outlets.

01. How did you get started in music?

I’ve always been interested in all kinds music, starting with playing the trumpet in marching and concert bands, and later playing acoustic and electric guitar and keyboards. I grew up on a steady diet of classic and progressive rock, so that sound has always influenced my music to some extent.

02 .Where did your direction come from?

Many different genres including Progressive Rock, bluegrass, and classical music.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

The Beatles, Pink Floyd, The Moody Blues, Yes, Roger Waters, and Alan Parsons are strong influences, but I’ve also been inspired by any genre that featured strong melodies and songwriting. Even very early music, including renaissance music, has inspired me!

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Music, like paintings, sculpture, and other forms of art, is a medium of expression. Although music can be entertaining, I view an instrument, like a guitar’s fretboard, a keyboard, valves on a trumpet, etc., like a blank canvas and a means to unveil the art from inside.

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

I don’t play live, but I would say that my records reflect my expression as an artist informed by my influences. They are intended to take the listener on a journey, yet contain some unexpected sonic surprises along the way.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Songwriting begins with an idea: either melodic or lyrical. These ideas can spawn when playing on the guitar or keyboard with no particular endpoint in mind: just letting the creativity flow and take over the playing. But sometimes ideas can arrive suddenly when I least expect it: exercising, eating, or even in the shower! The challenge is capturing and refining them so that they’re not lost forever.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

I’ve continually worked not only on instrument playing technique, but also production techniques and acquiring new instruments. So with each album, there’s new sonic territory to explore not only with the new sonic textures of additional instruments and sounds, but also production processes. The studio is truly an instrument with unlimited possibilities, so there are new sonic surprises to be unveiled on each album as my sound evolves.

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

Because I play all instruments on my albums and produce them as well, it’s a challenge to be objective when making production decisions. Sometimes just letting a track sit for a while and returning to it with fresh ears can make all
the difference.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

“Imagine” by John Lennon. The anthem’s simplicity and poignancy is a masterpiece that reflects Lennon’s genius and vision perfectly.

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Releasing music on an artistic level higher than what I released five years earlier.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

Alan Parsons, Brian Eno, David Gilmour, and Roger Waters. The collective experience, artistry, and achievements of those masters would certainly provide an inspiring recording session! Paul McCartney would be great too!

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

As the inspiration strikes, releasing records that reflect my artistic vision and influences that are made with the quality of the music as a
paramount consideration.

Web Links:

facebook.com/Jack-Jeffery-Music
twitter.com/JackJ
soundcloud.com/jjeffery
cdbaby.com/JackJeffery
youtube.com/JackJ

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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January 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Front page Interviews Music Rock Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – John Cee Stannard

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This entry is part 7 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

John Cee Stannard has been a singer-songwriter for more than fifty years and during that time has been privileged to work with lots of talented musicians. Before releasing his first solo blues based album he was a founder member of the folk group Tudor Lodge which was originally formed in 1968. We started playing at the White Horse in Reading, England and later we made appearances at other clubs on the folk circuit. In 1970 Lyndon Green and John were joined by American singer and flautist, Ann Steuart.

Tudor Lodge then toured the English folk circuit for over two years, teaming up with manager Karl Blore towards the end of 1970, and releasing our first album in 1971: “Tudor Lodge” (Vertigo 6360043). Later that year, we appeared at the prestigious Cambridge Folk Festival and also at Weeley Festival in Essex.

In January 2011, I wrote half a dozen songs. One of them was a bluesy number; five of those songs fell by the way side, but the blues number had struck a chord. Over the next few months, a couple of dozen blues based songs had joined the growing list of songs which took me in a completely new direction. It was as if I had found his voice. By the summer I knew that these songs had to be the basis of a solo project. It took until August of 2012 for recording to start, and by December it was done. Mixing took a further three months. In May 2013, the John Cee Stannard Blues Orchestra CD, the “Doob Doo” album, was launched.

01. How did you get started in music?

My introduction to pop music was the late 50’s, the days of Radio Luxemburg, Perry Como still at the top of the charts, then along came rock ‘n’roll. Elvis, Cliff, Tommy Steel, Marty Wilde, and the list goes on. I got my first guitar around 1958 for seven guineas. I started strumming chords to “When The Saints Go Marching In”. Got a lot of help from Bert Weedon’s “Play In A Day”, and concentrated on learning all those Shadows tunes. Hank Marvin was a hero then. Maybe still is. The first group I was in was called (don’t laugh) Jonny Ringo And The Rustlers. OK, you can laugh. This was around 1959 and I played lead guitar a la Hank Marvin, and of course we played Apache, as well as many non shadows instrumentals of the time such as “Walk Don’t Run” and “Perfidia” by the Ventures. Great days. Then the 60’s came and the Beatles influenced the future of pop in a big way.

02 .Where did your direction come from?

Much of my direction over the years has come from what I can and can’t do. I found picking out simple melodies very easy. So the early pop, Hank Marvin direction was clear. I could never play big, fast and furious solos, or be a fast and furious rock person, so that direction was blocked. The mid 60’s saw many brilliant Hammond based RnB outfits burst onto the scene. Zoot Money is still at it, as is Georgie Fame. So I fancied a go at keyboard no, unfortunately I couldn’t really play, but I didn’t see why that should stop me. So I bought a farfisa compact organ and learned to play Green Onions. That tune got me into a local pop group, The Mackandas. The next change of direction came when I gave my sister a lift to the Albert Hall to see Bob Dylan’s first concert there. I knew nothing of this music, but when the Mackandas split, the lead singer (John) his girlfriend and I formed a trio, called The Trio, and we started with some Dylan material. That partnership was short lived, but it led me to the local folk club, the White Horse in Reading (Run by a chap named Sid who refused to advertise in case the government paid him a visit). That of course led to Tudor Lodge and the next 47 years of music. The new change of direction came purely by chance after writing a few blues songs. I did not decide to do that they just came that way. So the change of direction to blues was drivel solely by the songs. This was then reinforced by an absolute love for what I was doing.

03. Who were your major influences and inspirations?

I honestly believe that everyone I see influences me, even if only in a minute way. Mike Cooper was a major influence. I’m talking about his work in the late 60’s, up to maybe 71′. But strangely, it is only now that it is influencing some of my musical style. Paul Mills has also been an influence on this new musical path. He contributed some great piano work to “The Doob Doo Album”. Whilst Hugh Laurie has not influenced the musical style and delivery, his albums, particularly his first album, were quite an influence on the approach to album production.

04. What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

The one fact that inspires to to continue on the path I seem to be treading, is quite simply, that I am having so much fun. It is satisfying and rewarding in so many ways. I’m having the time of my life so of course I want that to continue. What greater motivation or inspiration could there be to continue this current song writing and performance style?

If you are asking what inspires the individual songs, the answer is, almost exclusively nothing. Other than the huge musical heritage of the blues. Outside of that, it is fiction, and I don’t decide to sit down and write a song about this or that. They are never about me (with one very small exception.)

05. What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your shows?

I find this one hard. Luckily at a show last week, a superb local singer named Richard Cox-Smith came up with quite a good genre title Easy Blues. Although amplified of course, it is essentially acoustic blues tho I prefer to say blues based. It is not hard, full on blues. There is some country blues. Some with a slight rag-time feel, some with a slightly jazzy feel. Rock’n’Reel said the album was “…a very English nod to the blues.” I can’t argue with that. American singer songwriter rock and amazing guitar player Janet Robin said the album is like Doctor John, I don’t really see that, maybe a bit on the album.

06. How do you begin writing your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

I guess we’ve already covered this to some extent. To answer the first part I doodle. I pick up the guitar and just play around. If a riff or phrase sounds good I repeat it over and over and see if it takes me anywhere. At the same time I will doodle with words anything random. If I’ve been listening to an album by someone else, then a continuation of their theme may come into it. Once I have a verse of words, I look at it to see if it contains a theme I can carry forward and develop. Often I have no idea what a song is about as I write verse 1. A case in point is “Hid Behind The Door”. This is about domestic violence. When I was doodling the first verse, I was drawing on a song I wrote in 1972 which never went anywhere but I remembered the first few lines. It started random, but the last line of the first verse when it came seemed to be about an abusive situation – so I simply followed the theme for the rest of the song. It was an afterthought for the album – but some people say it’s their favourite track. So I don’t pick a subject or theme equally, I won’t shy away from a theme if it presents itself. For example, I was doodling a tune which wasn’t bluesy at all but I followed it through to see where it would go. As it developed, so the words for the first verse came along when I looked back at it, it seemed rather dark, maybe about someone who had had enough of life and wanted to move on. I thought of people who are terminally ill and desperate to be allowed to pass but medical science, coupled with (possibly misplaced) ethics, force us to keep them here for as long as possible so I had a song about euthanasia and suicide. It was far too dark for the album, and the wrong style of music, so I put it out there as a single called “Let Me Go”. A lovely video by Badger Music Media, see it HERE!.

07. How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

Firstly, with respect to the playing, very little in the way of gradual evolution just the occasional huge mutation. 10 years of flat-picking melodies and strumming fairly rigidly. Then along came the finger picking style (largely claw hammer) for Tudor Lodge, which remained almost unchanged for 47 years, and remains so. But then alongside that three years ago in 2011, the blues/rag whatever it is came along and is now an established line running along side the Tudor Lodge line. During this last three years though, the more bluesy style of playing has continued to evolve and develop. Starting with fairly straight forward songs and becoming a bit more interesting and varied. Learning how what you don’t play can be as important as what you do play. And last year, after over 50 years of guitar playing, I decided I could not put it off any longer, and I started having lessons. Thankfully my teacher is not trying to make me unlearn all I’m doing wrong, but is helping me to stretch my ideas and my playing good move. Secondly the music almost exactly the same pattern of development. 10 years of pop. 47 years of folk starting with the songs I wrote 1968 – 1971, and continuing with the songs Lynne has been writing for Tudor Lodge. Then three years of writing my own blues based material and mixing that with standard covers of people like Blind Blake, Blind Boy Fuller, and one or two surprises in a blues style such as “Raining In My Heart”

08. What has been your biggest challenge? How were you able to overcome this?

Ok objectively standing back from it all trying to be honest, lack of confidence. I never really thought of my music was good enough to stand on it’s own. With Tudor Lodge, I have always admired Lynne’s writing and playing, so I could hide behind that. With my own music, yes I was having fun, then making the album was really for me, I found it hard to take it that seriously. But then everyone who contributed, all these fine musicians who did sessions for me, they all found it credible, the feedback was quite astonishing, that in itself was a learning curve for me. How did I overcome it? Well thankfully it was the process that helped me overcome it. I am now feeling really quite confident with it.

09. If you could pick any song, what would you like to cover most and why?

I always though I should never do a song like ‘Georgia’ because the definitive versions have been done. I recently learned it as an exercise. I was persuaded to try it live. It wend down surprisingly well. My teacher recently gave me “God Bless The Child” as an exercise. I just might try that sometime soon. If I thought a could do them justice, then to cover a classic like one of those would be one hell of a thing. Why would I want to attempt that?  because it would be one hell of a thing.

10. Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Hopefully still making music. Hopefully still running Tudor Lodge alongside John Cee Stannard and Blue Horizon. We have been so lucky to get the number of gigs that we have since putting the Blue Horizon trio together last autumn. But to get ourselves on the Blues Festival circuit would be a dream. To get a small tour of the UK, or even the continent would be wonderful. To get, even just a handful of gigs in the states would be slightly WOW. Yes of course big gigs and tours would be great, but to make a living at it would be wonderful.

11. Who would you most like to record with?

I’ve had a few dreams here. For some reason, Sandi Thom was one of them. Karla Bonnof is one, though that wouldn’t work well with the blues. Someone I would love to have guesting on an album of mine would be Beverley Skeete. Yes I do day dream of other collaborations, but these are largely completely unattainable. But then what’s wrong with the occasional fantasy.

12. What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

I have just started work on the next album. This will not be the full Blues Orchestra as on “The Doob Doo Album”. It will be just me and Blue Horizon, (Mike Baker on Guitar and Howard Birchmore on harmonica) with added bass and drum. I hope to get that completed and launched by the end of summer 2014. Then I would like to do an album with a jazz band. The material is more or less sorted, and I have had initial chats with potential collaborators. It would be nice to get that done before the end of 2014. I will definitely want to do another Blue Horizon one after that as well as a couple of other album projects I am still developing. Plus, I spent 5 years writing a novel, and if there is no traditional publishing deal in the next few months, I plan to e-publish it myself. My objective is to achieve that before 2014 is done. I’ve recently started writing the occasional blog, which is fun, so will develop that. I also present an on line radio show most weeks and plan to continue with that. It goes out on Blast1386 Thursdays 1:00 to 3:00pm UK time.

Web Links:

johnceestannard.co.uk
facebook.com/johncee.stannard
twitter.com/JohnStannard46

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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March 12, 2014 By : Category : Blues DozenQ Folk Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Cauldronated speak to Eyeplug

Cauldronated are A punky, drum-centric, techno adventure featuring Eva Menon (Italian extrasolar poetess), David Harman and Dave Barbarossa (Drummer with Adam and The Ants, Bow Wow Wow, Republica, Chicane…

01 How did you first get started in music?

I deputised for the drummer in Adam and The Ants and Adam took me on.

02 Where did your direction come from?

My love of music and the drums.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I despise artificial passion in music, I can smell it like shit on my shoe. Far to many influences to mention.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

I am driven to create uniqueness. Anytime I’ve gone the straight route in music, I’ve been deflated. ‘Cauldronated’ is a strange brew; House/tehcno scenery, impassioned alien vocals and mental drums.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows?

Complete commitment to the instrument. Spellbinding singer, modern sounds.

06 How do you begin your song creation? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

From a beat, or a groove, a vocal line, everything is thrown into the Cauldron. The themes are historical yet, futuristic.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

I have followed my heart. I play what pleases me.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

To not sell myself out. To follow the teachings of geniuses I have worked with.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I don’t play them.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

‘Top o’ the world ma!’

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Cauldronated.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

More mental beats, Italian style and heady grooves, all live, all full-on.

Web Links:

cauldronated.com
facebook.com/cauldronated
facebook.com/BarbarossaBeat
soundcloud.com/cauldronated

Cauldronated @ The Finsbury – 21st Nov 2013

A welcome blast of superheated noise from the stage of this vast Manor House pub on one of the year’s coldest nights, Cauldronated lived up to my every expectation. Hard to believe that it takes just two people to make this brimming, bone shaking sound, the beat provided by Dave Barbarossa, veteran of such chart-bruising acts like Adam and the Ants, Bow Wow Wow and Republica, the voice and yet more drum work courtesy of the mysterious Eva Menon, she of the dark locks, tattoos, and more than a nod to the classic female rock stars of the much missed late 1970’s. With just a hint of synth to flesh out the sound, this heady brew showed its strength from the word go.

Playing the ice maiden with considerable relish, a huge 80’s cut jacket thrown over her slight shoulders, Eva glares, struts and swerves in front of her mike, coldly intoning the bullet-point vituperative lyrics, as synths wail and scream, Dave pounding out a thunderous beat that will tolerate no dissent. Difficult to characterise in one heading, Cauldronated seem to inhabit a world of their own making, somewhere in the wastes between rock, synth pop and trance, but without getting enmired in any of them.

Every young woman who ever picked up a microphone in anger seems to be embodied in Eva, her Siouxsie/ Ronny persona showing up most of today’s so-called cougars for the compliant puppets they really are. Dave’s enviable drum pedigree ensured a solid wall of rhythm for every song, with their electronic friend’s unobtrusive wailing a perfect backup.

Throwing her huge jacket aside, revealing a one-piece man-drag outfit that perfectly complemented her onstage self, Eva’s voice ran the gamut from Siouxsie to Poly, with even a suggestion of Diamanda, as she spat out yet more bile to the accompaniment of the screaming synth and rumbling drums which she shared stage with.

Scenester

Scenester lives in London and Brighton, as time allows. Enjoys music, film, television, books, design and anything else which won’t leave well alone. Old enough to know better.

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November 12, 2013 By : Category : Beats Dark DozenQ Gigs Instruments Interviews Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , , , ,
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DozenQ – Joe Symes and The Loving Kind

This entry is part 5 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

Joe Symes and the Loving Kind are an original five piece acoustic rock outfit from Liverpool, UK. The group has spent the last 12 months launching their explosive assault on UK clubs and festivals. Joe, Colin and Chris take some time out to talk to eyeplug.net

01 How did you get started in music?

Joe: I started taking an interest in music when i was about 8 years of age, I started playing drums at first which then progressed to guitar and other instruments and eventually writing songs.

Colin: I wanted to play drums from the age of 11, but didn’t get an actual kit until I was 14 after my parents realised my interest wasn’t just a passing phase. I haven’t looked back since.

Chris: I don’t think there was any particular point which made me want to get into music, I think it’s something I always wanted to do, pestering the folks for a guitar when I was 8 or 9, the natural progression then was to want to be in a band.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Joe: It came from having lots of music around the house with my parents and older brother’s and sister’s listening to a lot of different styles of music.

Chris: I am self taught, so just through listening to different bands. Having supportive family and friends has always helped though.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Joe: The main influence for me is The Beatles but there are so much more influences that there are to many to mention, I like a lot of different styles of music and great songwriters, Also a lot of what’s going on in the world, media also influences me, I have no time for shows like the X factor and all them shows, It means nothing to me and it’s not even about music.

Colin: My personal major influences are drummers like John Densmore (he and the rest of The Doors are the reason I play music), Ringo Starr, all the Motown drummers, Charlie Watts, Art Blakey, Gene Krupa, I could go on. Ha! There’s a lot people I despise, but I probably shouldn’t mention any names, as I may get sued. Ha! Ha!

Chris: Major influence has to be my mum, she got me into the music that has influenced my playing, plus she’s always had some pretty good taste in music as well. There are people in the industry that I don’t agree with how they do things, but I don’t think it’s my place to say, yet!

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Joe: Writing from personal experiences and also working with band member’s that are in tune with the way I’m thinking when i come to the band with a new song, I’ll have idea’s and they’ll contribute and it works all the time.

Colin: I’d say our confidence in ours individually and collectively inspires us to make our music, and the fact that we feel there are no limitations in what we do now and in the future.

Chris: The feel of the song helps it to develop what it becomes, there are no set rules or boundaries as to what the end product will be.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Joe: A really great LIVE show & performance, An honest performance and not a staged show.

Colin: The thing I’d say is just a great show with great songs, which in my opinion have a long lasting quality.

Chris: An honest, live energetic performance, with catchy songs that just want to make you get involved.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Joe: The songs begin in all kinds of different ways,  I don’t have one set way to write songs they just happen and grow and take on a life of their own. All the songs are biographical.

Chris: The songs can be about anything from everyday life, again it depends on the feel of the song! Joe will come to rehearsal with the core of the song and we help to create the sound he has in his head, all being on same wave length helps.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

Joe: It has evolved a lot since i started out, working with different musicians, growing up listening to different music, You are only as good as your last song, album that you have released.

Chris: Of course, I can play better now than when I was 9, ha! I think as you go through life you listen to different music and your perspectives change so this alters how you play.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Joe: My biggest challenge was getting the right band members to join the band, and also being able to play, some people say that they can play and when you audition them, most of them don’t even know what they are doing or talking about, I have no time for time wasters, I think I have now overcome the biggest challenge by meeting the right people to form the band.

Chris: Tricky one, getting the songs out to as many people as possible. Internet and the media help with this
.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Joe: No we don’t play covers, We have no need to, As for covering a song… I can’t answer that one as their are so many to choose from.

Colin: No, we don’t play covers. I guess there are some favourites we’d like to play if it was for a good enough reason, but at the moment we’re just so immersed in playing original material.

Chris: No covers is not something we are keen on doing! If I had to pick one I’m a big Pink Floyd fan, so maybe something like Interstella Overdrive.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

Joe: I’d like to have great albums recorded as we are in the process of starting our 2nd album in the new year and then a third one, I’d also just like to be able to live comfortably and continue playing LIVE and writing and touring.

Colin: At a point where we’re a highly respected band with a fine back catalogue.

Chris: Still making music, be it wherever or win whatsoever form it is.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Joe: I’d like to record with Paul McCartney, have a jam with him, also i’d like to work with Paul Weller, Anyone else who i’d like to with with has either passed on or there are only so many band members left, Who knows?

Colin: There’s a lot of people I’d like to record with. Unfortunately, most of them are dead.

Chris: Syd Barrett back in 1966.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Joe: A lot more new songs, album’s and new video’s, Gigs, You can find more about us on the following websites and download our debut album from our official website also in CD format at…

Colin: You can expect a double A side single out in late February, and a brand new album out late next year. We like to plan ahead.

Chris: Just more shows up and the country, as well as the release of our AA side single due out early next year.

Web Links:

joesymes.co.uk
facebook.com/pages/JOE-Symes
reverbnation.com/1joesymes
twitter.com/joeysymes

Link to buy our music:
joesymes.co.uk
itunes.apple.com/joe-symes-and-the-loving-kind

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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October 27, 2013 By : Category : DozenQ Eyeplugs Front page Indie Interviews Rock Tags:, , ,
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DozenQ – The Daydream Club

This entry is part 4 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

Adam Pickering and Paula Walker met while studying at The Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA). They started performing together as The Daydream Club in 2010. Founding their own label ‘Poco Poco Records’ and releasing their debut album Overgrown in the same year. Overgrown deliberately aimed to strip away production layers to focus on songwriting and acoustic instrumentation. The album brought them critical acclaim with the duo being invited to perform live sessions for BBC Nottingham and BBC Tees.

01 How did you get started in music?

Adam: I’ve been involved with music for as long as I can remember. I knew quite early on that I wanted to do something with music or art. As it turns out, with The Daydream Club I get to do both.

Paula: I’ve always had music in my life. I was a bit of an instrument ‘starter’ growing up. I took guitar lessons, piano lessons, violin lessons and flute lessons but I never had the dedication or drive to follow a syllabus so I was also a bit of a quitter. After passing my music A levels I moved on to study dance so it wasn’t until a knee injury that I rediscovered my musical side.

02 Where did your direction come from?

When we first started writing together we were creating electro/pop songs. It wasn’t until we did an open mic night for fun, armed with just two voices and an acoustic guitar that our direction changed. We received such a lovely response to our no gimmicks, intimate performance that we decided to explore this further. Our debut album Overgrown was created on this idea of honest, intimate, stripped-back music. From that introduction we’ve built on the sound, adding more instruments and dynamics and with each release we like to try and incorporate our electro side with a remix or a alternate versions.

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

The Beatles, Fleetwood Mac, Wings, Simon & Garfunkel, Joni Mitchell, Steve Reich, Moondog, Sufjan Stevens, Beck, Goldfrapp, Daft Punk, Ray Charles… we don’t like to limit our influences. Despise is a strong word, we’re not so fond of music that is more business than art but at the end of the day we are creators and not critics.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

We never follow any set formula, we just see where a song takes us. There are no restrictions on sound as you can probably gather from our back catalogue and remix alter egos. One element that did influence some of the sound of our new EP Found was the instruments we had to hand. We had just invested in a mandolin and an accordion so naturally they were getting a bit of love on the recordings.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows?

Between the two of us we juggle instruments but the foundation is pretty much boy/girl harmonies, acoustic guitar, percussion and some added extra sprinkles form the likes of piano, melodica and glockenspiel. We like gigs to be personable so no matter the stage size we always try and include our audiences in some way shape or form.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

This varies, some songs we’ve made up characters and fictional worlds and others are from personal experience. At this point its probably best to point out that The Affair from Overgrown is 100% fictional, Paula isn’t a knife wielding ‘cheating boyfriend’ killer!

07  How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

You could say its changed a lot. We were electro and now we’re acoustic (though we still like to dabble)! One day maybe the two sounds will join, who knows.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you able to overcome this? If so, how?

We’ve had a few challenges come our way; stage fright, setting up a record label, releasing our own music, running our own fan funding campaign, creating our own artwork, creating a larger sound with just two people for live gigs… I could probably go on but you probably get the gist that most of our musical journey we’ve been out of our comfort zone in some way or another! We’ve overcome all of these things by just doing them, get your head down and get stuck in. You won’t accomplish anything if you don’t dare to try.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We do indeed play covers. We’ve already covered a song that we really love and like to think we put ‘The Daydream Club’ stamp on it. It was a bit of an obvious one (Skinny Love – Bon Iver) but its such a brilliant song we couldn’t resist.

10 Where do you envisage being in five years time?

We like to think we’ll be creating original music still, ideally on a larger scale. It would be amazing to collaborate with an orchestra at some point so that seems like a pretty decent 5 year plan for now. Time will tell.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

This is an easy one, George Martin. He’s not just an amazing producer but an awesome composer and arranger in his own right too. He created absolute magic with The Beatles, it would be pretty inspirational to work with him.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Our new EP Found is released on the 28th October 2013. We’ll be playing a string of dates supporting The South, as well as a support date with Bridie Jackson and The Arbour and our own launch gigs in both London and Leicester.

Web Links:

thedaydreamclub.com
facebook.com/thedaydreamclub
twitter.com/thedaydreamclub
youtube.com/thedaydreamclub

Live Dates 2013:

12th Oct: Supporting The South @ Apex, Bury St Edmunds
19th Oct: Supporting The South @ Warehouse24, Newcastle
25th Oct: EP Launch Party @ Paper Dress Vintage, London
1st Nov: Supporting Bridie Jackson & The Arbour @ The Vic, Saltburn
3rd Nov: Supporting The South @ Waterfront, Norwich
7th Nov: EP Launch Party @ The Donkey, Leicester

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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October 9, 2013 By : Category : DozenQ Features Folk Front page Instruments Interviews Music Pop Tags:, , ,
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DozenQ – The Como Brothers Band

This entry is part 3 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

Matt and Andrew Como are songwriters and musicians that value organic music, musicianship, and songs with original integrity. Music is not a hobby of the brothers but a way of life and a career. Early in life, their father and his brothers would play at family parties. Growing up in this environment inspired them to play music, and it fast became a central part of their lives. They extensively played live throughout high school and college and are now an experienced live act having played in countless bars, major festivals and local shows. In 2010 they officially began the rock band The Como Brothers Band and have been pushing forward for their dreams of a long term career in music. Matt Como took some time out to talk to eyeplug.net

01 How did you get started in music?

My brother Andrew and I were always interested in music. Andrew started playing guitar in 6th grade and I started later on. I remember the first thing I learned how to play on guitar was the riff to The Beatles song Day Tripper, after I realized I had the potential to learn I knew that playing music would be an ultimate obsession for me. It is just something we connected with. We got started from our parents getting us involved in music lessons as well.

02 Where did your direction come from?

Early on our musical direction came from our Dad. He was in a band with his brothers when he was younger and he would always be playing music from Billy Joel, The Beatles, Huey Lewis and the News, and many other rock artists like that so that’s what Andrew and I were started on.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Every artist has had different inspirations in life so I don’t despise anyone for playing the music they feel connected with. Some types of music I wouldn’t play maybe because it’s not in the toolshed of possible things that I could be good at. There are types of music I may not like to listen to but that doesn’t make it wrong for someone else to like it. Our major influences and inspiration come from great songwriting and the blues. Stevie Ray Vaughan, BB King, and John Mayer were big in terms of guitar influence.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

Andrew and I try to create relatable ideas that we can write about and put an original spin on the music through lyrics and instrumentation. Having an original integrity is a driving force behind the inspiration of any song that we write.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We can bring the songs energy and hopefully people in the audience can draw on that and have a fun time. Our main goal is to get people grooving and having a good time. A self-indulgent show is something we aren’t interested in? we always say if people are coming out to see any particular act they want to have fun and we want to setup the atmosphere of the gig to enable people to have that good time.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

None of our songs should leave any one saying, what the hell was that about? Our goal with our songs is to create music that is relatable. Even though we may be pulling from personal experience, the experiences we are expressing are ones that other people can say, I know how that feels. Songs that I’ve written deal with light vs. dark, hoping for a better future, rising up above hard times, dealing with struggles, but also happier topics involving relationships and better times.

07 How did your music evolve since you first began playing?

It has evolved a ton, even from a six months ago. If you listen to the EPs we released in 2010, 2012, early 2013 and now our new full length album Baby Steps that will be released on October 1 (2013) I think there can be clear improvements heard in the musicianship, songwriting, and vocals and I think that just shows how much we have been working at it to get better every day. Andrew and I have been practicing a lot for some time now and at a certain point we’ve always said we have to trust in our abilities and get out there, we feel that it’s time to get out and play.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Over time the realization that music is a business that takes major time and investment outside of actually playing the music. This is a big struggle and challenge because as an independent act I am financially putting everything I have into the band including recording costs, marketing, websites and etc. And also the time it takes to maintain all the social sites, act as our own booking agent and many other things. I think our next step may be to look into management. We definitely would like to tour, especially at colleges, but making that a reality is where we are at right now.

09 Have you released any music videos?

We just released two singles from the Baby Steps album at the end of the summer: Straight Face and Late Nights. The music videos were shot in our hometown of Port Jefferson. That made them pretty special for us that our first videos were able to have a hometown feel. The videos were filmed/edited/directed by our producers Tom Flynn and Mike Watts of VuDu Studios. Those guys are amazing and we really love working with them on both the music and other things like music videos. We have two really cool lyric videos that we made with those guys as well that will be released this fall too!

10 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

On October 1st (2013) our debut first full length album, Baby Steps will be released. Check iTunes! We will also be releasing two lyric videos in the coming month for songs on the album. After that we will be promoting the album and hopefully supporting it with meaningful gigs so fans can come see us play and hopefully we’ll make new fans with this effort.

Web Links:

Comobrothersband.com
Facebook.com/ComoBrothersBand
Twitter.com/ComoBrosBand
Instagram@ComoBrosBand

Link to buy the current single:

itunes.apple.com/the-como-brothers-band
soundcloud.com/comobrothersband

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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August 29, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Music Rock Tags:, , ,
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DozenQ – FOG project

This entry is part 2 of 19 in the series DozenQ 4

FOG project was an idea hatched during a fog drenched, cold and wet evening walk to the pub in October 2011. The manifesto is to record dark electronic songs but mask them in a joyful way.

Originally our debut song Tired was recorded in a booze fuelled recording session. A few people who heard it went mental over it and convinced us put it out.

We did – and with a little help we infiltrated the UK’s capital attaining radio play at BBC Radio London, XFM London and at one point Radio 1, but we didn’t hear it ourselves.

Our studio is in a constantly shifting state and is often pulled apart and rebuilt in different locations. We’ve even tried recording in the car but the laptop battery went flat before we could really do anything.

01 How did you get started in music?

We met at an amateur dramatic group and realised we had an equal interest in writing and recording music. We shared demo tapes and decided to give recording together a try and it just worked and has continued to work.

02 Where did your direction come from?

A natural love and need to create art. It sounds corny but it’s something we both do like it’s heaven sent. Sure we both struggle creatively from time to time but it’s not meant to be easy is it!

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

We don’t like the idea of despising other musicians. They’re just doing what they do whatever their driving factor is. If they make an unappealing noise then we just don’t listen. Whatever you do or say the music is still there afterward so that hatred never really achieves anything.

Collectively we share a similar taste in music from the likes of Prince, the Beatles, U2, Gary Numan, Radiohead, MGMT, Thomas Dolby and many more. It all influences us somewhere but we try and remain true to ourselves and create music for ourselves.

04 What inspires you to make your current type of songs and sound?

It could be anything really. A bad day or news report could influence a narrative whereas daily sounds like a pneumatic drill or hammering in a certain way or pattern could inspire a rhythm or groove. Ste once heard a song in the distance wrongly and drew a completely new song from it which amazingly didn’t sound like the one he had heard wrong.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We’re not a live act, we’re songwriter / producers so don’t have any plans to get out on the road as most of our music would be just backed via a computer. We could technically just press play and then go to the pub but I don’t think that would go down well with a crowd. Festivals we would consider. We would stay out of the pub for them.

06 How do you begin your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

It can vary. Sometimes the lyrics come first other times the music does. Our songs usually carry quite a dark message if you stop and listen to them and this can be reflected in the music sometimes but usually we create a contrast between then words and the overall sound of the tune. Subject matter is usually relating to life, loves and pain – however we have recorded a track about an abandoned Third Reich robot project called Heil Robot so anything goes really.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing?

Largely we’ve just got better equipment and software and our skills in producing have developed over time. Other than that if you listen to our early work compared to today we’ve remained consistent.

08 What has been your biggest challenge? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge continues even today which is trying to get our music out to the masses. Everyone says social media is the way forward but it just isn’t. We have our pages but interaction is so slack and it’s not been for the want of trying to engage our fans. We very quickly accepted that nothing has changed, you still need pluggers, you still need a PR machine and at the very least you need to be able to make friends with industry people and be able to ring round and get your music played wherever you can.

Understanding how radio stations work, how they’re play listed and which stations are owned by big groups helps because you know who to target with your music and who to not bother with. This isn’t something you overcome – you just have to keep on keeping on and keep the faith. One day your music will fall onto a really useful persons desk… one day that day will be yours!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We don’t do covers. We barely have time to write and record our own music never mind other peoples. Sometimes we’ll nick bits from other songs though, that’s always good for a laugh because people never notice.

10 Where did you envisage being in five years time?

We’ll still be churning out the music; doing it independently and wherever the music takes us you can guarantee we’ll be happy.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Nobody springs to mind I’m afraid. We’re such fast workers that anyone who we joined with would probably walk out in frustration after the first few hours. We don’t like faffing around too much – the pubs are calling.

12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

We’ve got an album coming out before the end of 2013 called “Zoltar Speaks” and it will be available on iTunes and Amazon MP3. No Spotify for us anymore – streaming music is grim because it does away with a need to commit to a band or artist. Years ago your only option was to buy an album either on vinyl, cassette or CD and once you did you would feel an obligation to listen to the whole thing because you’d bought it so you might as well.

With MP3’s that’s all gone. You don’t have to buy an album; you only have to buy the tracks from it that you like which are usually the ones you’ve heard on the radio – so you’re letting other people make your mind up for you. The sense of exploration has gone.

Even with streaming you only get 30 seconds into a track and you find yourself skipping it to something you know. It’s all too immediate; it’s all destinations and no journey. It’s such a shame but we’d rather people buy a track and become our spiritual friend rather than stream and discard us.

The next single will also feature a special puzzle that you can do on our website: fogproject.co.uk, In order to get a copy of the MP3 you will need to solve a puzzle and in doing so you unlock various parts of the track. Unlock them all and you get the full track otherwise you end up with just bits – you might end up with just the drums or perhaps bass and vocals. It should be fun.

Web Links:

www.fogproject.co.uk
www.facebook.com/fogprojectofficial
www.twitter.com/FOG_project
www.reverbnation.com/fogmusic
www.soundcloud.com/fogmusic
www.youtube.com/fogproject

Link to buy the current single: itunes.apple.com/we-are-one-single

 

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Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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August 29, 2015 By : Category : Beats DozenQ Eyeplugs Front page Industrial Interviews Music Pop Post-punk Tags:, ,
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