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DozenQ – The Lone Groover

This entry is part 5 of 20 in the series DozenQ

The Lone Groover is Brian Caulfield – a one-man-and-a-guitar outfit who channels his love of folk, punk, and Americana into classic songs of beauty and passion. EYEPLUG caught up with him to hurl some questions his way:

01 How did you get started?

After being in a number of hard working bands over the years, the last one folding in 2009, I felt it was time to go it alone. This was partly out of necessity, because it becomes increasingly difficult for older geezers to get a (decent) band together, and the thought of going through the whole audition process filled me with dread. Also, as a relatively new dad it’s meant I can rehearse at home in between nappy changes. Initially, I wasn’t sure about going solo but after each gig I just became more confident with the reaction I was getting and realised that this was the way forward for me.

02 Where did your name come from?
I appropriated it from a cartoon strip that used to be in the NME in the late 70’s. I’ve never hid the fact that I got it from somewhere else. I’ve taken it as a loving tribute to a great, intelligent, funny cartoon strip about the music biz, and a wonderful period in time. It’s very nostalgic for me – I give out copies of the original strips at gigs – Tony Benyon (who created The Lone Groover) was the man. I’ve become something of an authority on both Lone Groovers.

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

I have a lot of influences musical and otherwise, but as I’ve said many times – ‘I wanna walk like The Clash and sound like Bob Dylan’. I no longer have the energy to despise, though there’s always a few who get the blood if not boiling, then lukewarm.

04 What drives you to make music?

I love to write – it’s something I’m pretty good at.  There’s always something (an emotion, a phrase you hear, a topical story, a conversation etc) that starts the ball rolling and is worth putting down on paper, though I understand that not every idea or song is a good one, so quality control is important too. I also love to play live, a good gig is a great thing whether as a performer or a punter – that’s what it’s all about in some respect.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live show?

A one man and guitar outfit who thinks he’s a full band. I’m not an introspective singer songwriter type – I’m very physical and can still pull off a few rock moves when I need to. But I also speak to the audience as adults in between songs to build a rapport. So in a nutshell, great songs, groovy clobber, old school sensibilities and talkin’ jive.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Living, loving and lounging in early 21st century Britain, a smattering of pop culture references, trips down memory lane, state of the nation addresses, observations on modern life, politics with a small ‘p’, the ageing process, and of course peace, love and harmony.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing?

What can I say, I just keep on getting better……

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Not having a band but making sure the songs still have depth and gravitas has been the biggest challenge. All the tricks you learn in a band (and all the instruments you have at your disposal) are suddenly removed so you need to learn new tricks pretty quickly. When solo, it’s much harder to keep the interest of the crowd so you need to develop interesting ways in how to engage them. Having good songs is a starting point but that’s not always enough. You need to also, dare I say it; ‘entertain’. I also know that I can’t compete with a full blown group but I’m a bloody great support act for them.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

I always play one or two covers – it’s one of my strengths as a performer – I really enjoy re-interpreting other songs on just an acoustic guitar. I like to choose ones that on paper don’t sound as if they should, or could be done on just a guitar. It’s a real challenge as it’s important that I do them justice. I’m always a fan of the original. I currently do ‘Eton Rifles’, ‘Sound Of The Suburbs’, ‘Fight For Your Right (To Party)’, and my piece de resistance ‘Young Americans’. I’ll continue to pick them out as I go along.

10 Where do you envisage being in five years time?

Well, I can’t split up with myself over musical differences I suppose…

11 Who would you most like to record with?

I’d like Nick Lowe to produce me fronting a group with Mani on Bass, Charlie Watts on drums, Steve Nieve – Keyboards, Johnny Marr – Guitar, Ronnie Spector – BV’s, ha ha ha! Fucking old school or what? I am a product of my time –failing that, Lady Gaga!
12 What should we be expecting from you in the near future?

Gigs, gigs and more gigs – in London and beyond. The more people who attend the shows the more likely I get asked back, but it’s a tough sport and there’s a lot of competition, so please come to the gigs and check out the usual suspect network sites. Also I’ll soon be recording my 2nd EP with an accompanying low maintenance video to one of the songs. (1st EP – Folk Music For City Dwellers, still available)

www.myspace.com/thelonegrooveruk


admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Folk Genres Interviews Music Punk Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Ravens In Paris

This entry is part 4 of 20 in the series DozenQ

Ravens In Paris are a three-piece Combo making dark waves as we speak! We managed to catch them for a short but sweet feeding session!

01 How did the band get together?

We used to be in a band backing a singer song writer, but following his diva-like activities of not turning up to practice we started working on stuff without him and realised we are actually a million times better as a three-piece (and Beaz voice was a million times better). So we sacked him off and started Ravens In Paris.

 

02 Where did your name come from?

The name wasn’t something that just came to us. James and Beaz were listening to lots of French pop and getting really into Paris and the catacombs underground. The idea of underground clubs and secret societies really captured our imagination and we wanted to reflect this in the name.

 

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

For us, most themes and ideas come from whatever we are into at the time. It could be a film or a book, or an old album or poem; anything really. We just all throw in our influences and ideas and this sound comes out that we really love. We don’t really like over-analysing it, it’s just how we sound, and luckily we love it!

 

04 What drove you to make music together?

As we mentioned, we were backing a singer songwriter and we formed the band from that. We just click really well musically and work really well together.

 

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

I guess you have to just come along and check it out. We have a lot of energy and are pretty loud. Everything we have written so far has the live show in mind – so it’s what we do best – a full-on blast to get you moving. No ballads, no banter just the tunes played loud and hard.

 

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

We all write the songs together. When we ditched the previous singer, he was the songwriter, so we just learnt the ropes together and worked out how to write songs. The songs tend to change a lot as we write them – so it’s a long process – but we each have our own strengths and the songs are better for it. Hopefully, everyone else will love it as much as we do. Subjects vary, although women do tend to crop up quite often – although the lyrics are dark, rather than romantic!

 

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

It evolved loads and is still evolving; when we first started writing together we didn’t have much song writing experience, but now we have developed a sound which really defines us, dark, dirty and a bit cheeky.

 

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

We haven’t really had any major challenges as such, we love playing together and writing music together. We are now about to look for a label to finance our album, which I’m sure will be a challenge and a half!

 

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We have never done a cover. We have been toying with a couple of songs recently but not really got that far on them. We did work out ‘Toxic’ by Britney, which sounded pretty ace, but apart from that it’s just our own stuff.

 

10 Where did you envisage the band being in five years time?

Touring the world, making records and filling some big venues.

 

11 Who would you most like to record with?

We recorded our single with Gavin Monaghan and, to be honest, the combination of us and him and his team was amazing, so I would say more of the same! And maybe a one off single with Dr Dre if he happens to be passing through North London and is at a loose end.

 

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

We are just releasing our second single on our label ‘Madame Claude Records’ and we will be doing an accompanying tour. We are in talks to book in a tour in California in the summer and sorting out a few festivals. We are recording our debut album and hope to release that later this year. Good times!

www.ravensinparis.com

 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – The Fantastics

This entry is part 1 of 20 in the series DozenQ

Mixing together funk, blues, soul, jazz, and whatever else happens to be on hand, THE FANTASTICS! have released 45s on Freestyle, Raw Wax, and Tramp, performed live BBC sessions for Mark Lamarr and Craig Charles, and released albums on Freestyle Records and Soul Cookers (as Rev Cleatus & The Soul Saviours). Like their incendiary live performances around the UK and across Europe, the last album, ‘Mighty Righteous’ (Freestyle Records) ripped up the rigidly defined genres of ‘the funk scene’, and threw decades of hip swinging musical influences into the mix. The latest album (due for release on Freestyle Records in summer 2011) takes these themes further to create something fresh and engaging, whilst still keeping dancefloors shaking, and hips swinging.

“Thank god for The Fantastics!! Not only should you buy their records, go and witness them live!” – DJ Format

01 How did the band get together?

Originally the band (then known as Rev Cleatus & The Soul Saviours) was formed from the remains of the Longo Allstars in 2003, when Greg (Hammond) – previously of the Soul Destroyers, and Ray (bass) both joined up with Pete (guitar), and the other remaining Longos. And, Mark (sax/flute/harmonica) joined up after the departure of a makeshift horn section in 2005. We changed our name to the Fantastics! (don’t forget the “!”) in 2009, and since then we’ve had a few new people join up; James Smith (drums) replaced James Rule in  2009, and there’s our very special guests; Sulene Fleming (vocals) and Mark Claydon (percussion).. So I don’t think the band ‘got together’ as such, it’s been more of an evolution over about seven years or so.

02 Where did your name come from?

It didn’t… We just liked it and changed it!

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Too many influences to list here – let’s just say decades of groovin’ and soulful music; blues, soul, funk, reggae, jazz, even a bit of groovy rock – it’s all in there somewhere. Who do we despise? Anything soul-less, over hyped, over technical.. You’d have to ask individual members really!

04 What drove you to make music together?

Just the love of music, especially this kind of music I suppose. We’ve got a lot in common, and we have some great times, so why wouldn’t we want to do it?

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

Music to dance to.. Music to have a good time to.. Plenty of groovy funk rhythms, and some sweet soul; music aimed at people on the dancefloor, not the musicians standing at the bar watching with crossed arms! It’s just good-time hip music really…

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

All songs are written collectively – somebody might have a particular idea or part which kick starts something, but overall they are all worked on and written as a band. Themes and subjects? Ermmm….  Sex and drugs and funk and soul hahaah! But then again the majority of the tunes are instrumental so nobody knows what they are about anyway (or cares!).

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

It’s become less straight ahead ‘funk’ since 2009, and more of a mixture of all our influences; more ‘natural’ if you like – we play our own music in our own style. It’s not something we’ve contrived to sound like the JBs or the Meters, or the whatever is fashionable at the moment… well we hope so anyway..

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

There’s been a few, but it’s just part of playing music. If you really want to do it, then you overcome anything that gets in the way, one way or another!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Yes we play some covers – it’s good to have a few to throw into the set, and I think we pretty much do play any songs that we collectively feel we’d like to.. Current favourites are probably Sweetback (Boogaloo Joe Jones), and Home Is Where The Hatred Is (Gill Scott-Heron), we’re looking at doing Anti Love Song (Betty Davis) sooner or later too.

10 Where did you envisage the band being in five years time?

On the M1, probably half way between London and Leeds, possibly stuck on the hard shoulder with a broken fan belt.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Too many to list here, but nobody in particular either – a strange answer I know!

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

We’re just putting the finishing touches onto our next album, which should be out in June or July – on Freestyle records. More gigs being booked as I’m writing this; check our links for updates.

Links:

The Fantastics on Myspace

The Fantastics on Facebook

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Funk Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Thee Ones

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series DozenQ

Thee Ones are:

Nick Buckle – Guitar + Vox
Graeme Owen – Double Bass
Rufus Fry – Harmonica
Chipeye – Drums

Thee Ones have been delivering fire-branded rhythm & soul to the west countries bohemia set for a far few years now. And a far more to come!

01 How did the band get together?

The core of Thee Ones came together with Nick And Greame joined forces as a song writing team and resulting in explosive performances at the now notorious Hub Club. Various different faces come and gone as drummers and organist but in 2009, with the joining of Rufus on Harp, the cast was set.

02 Where did your name come from?

We were named by our first drummer, Stevie Carnage, who said “Don’t be a no-one be A ONE!”.

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

There is too many creators of inspiration out there to list them all but  – Steve Marriott –  Captain Beefheart – Howlin Wolf – Willie Bobo – Little Walter – Terry Reid – and so much more. As ‘who we despise?’ Well we generally love all. But Graeme says he despises JLS and Chris Moyles.

04 What drives you to make music together?

The Love of it.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live show?

Sweat and charisma.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Nick Buckle writes all the lyrics which paint the normal world with a twisted brush.  Tall tales of scarecrows and towerblocks. Temptresses and mothmen. Peacock dandys and back street playboys. Love found with the help hooky Voodoo.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing together?

We are more stripped down and hard edged than when we started out. We have moved through fazes of hammond psych, latin soul and power pop and now find ourselves dishing up driving hard R&B.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Keeping consistency through periods of changing band members. We’re gone through 5 drummers (+ the odd stand in for gigs here and there) and 2 organists. But  lucky we always attract more willing and able.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We sometimes do:
‘Pass the hatchet’ Rodger & the Gypsys
‘Baby likes to boogaloo’ Don Gardner
‘Teanage Beat’ Little Walter
‘Daddy Rollin Stone’ Otis Blackwell (slow and sleazy)

10 Where do you envisage the band being in five years time?

Sleeping off 5 more years of debauched mayhem.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

JLS

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Keep an eye out for our new EP ‘Swamp Boogaloosis’ (Ingenium Records). Summer festivals – Nailstock in April and headline slot at Pussyfoot Stage at Sunrise in June. August set for London Gigs then we are planning to go to France and Spain.

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Modernist Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – Dig For Victory

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series DozenQ

Dig For Victory came out fighting from the ashes of Mama Roux with a new sound of their own, and the band continues to forge ahead with an increasingly psychedelic breed of rock. ‘Feel The Fire’ is the key track that bridges the gap between the past and future sounds of this blistering SE London 5 piece.

01 How did the band get together?

Myself and Andrew have been in different incarnations of this band since we were teenagers. Various members have come and gone and the name has changed a few time, but the ethos remains, We write and play what we like because it’s what we love to do. That’s regardless of any external trends or scenes.

02 Where did your name come from?

Well just between you and I, Andrew is a closet World War fanatic and a couple of us are 60’s freaks. So it just fits.

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

Our rhythm section love early REM and similar Power Pop bands. A couple of us regularly worship at the alter of Mick and Keef. And to balance out our retro leanings Tim is Radiohead all the way – blasting us in to the future. None of us are particularly in to Urban/R&B sounds or any of Simon Cowells pop-pap creations.

04 What drives you to make music together?

We’re friends and enjoy each others company, so getting together to rock out is an absolute joy. We all get off on the creative side too, everyone gets involved and it rarely feels like hard work.

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live show?

Its a high octane Rock n’ Roll Show. And I can’t stress enough it IS a SHOW. I prance round the stage like a portly Mick Jagger and love nothing more than winning over a new audience. I’m pleased to say if they’re not all converts after the first song, they are by the time we’re finished.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Each member of the band will bring their own songs to the table, if not completed at least the bare bones. The rest put they’re spin on it and hey presto! I look after the lyrics and melodies. Most songs tend to be about girls, broken hearts or losing my hair. Y’know, all the deep stuff.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing together?

We used to be quite poppy. Think early Supergrass had they been around in 1971. But Since Mac (Bass) joined, our music has become more groove based. Both guitarists are using a wider range of effects, giving us a more expansive sound. There’s more depth now. Its an exciting time, sonically speaking.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Honestly? Finding the motivation to make things happen. Our destiny is in our hands, but no one member drives this band. Plus we’re all of an age where we care little about ‘making it’ and just love playing for the sake of playing. Apart from hiring someone to poke us with a cattle prod – I’m not sure of the solution.

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

Historically we’ve always played a cover in the set including: ‘Sweet Emotion’ by Aerosmith and The Animals ‘We Gotta Get Out Of This Place’ Andrew is keen to put our stamp on 80s classics, ‘Walk Like an Egyptian’ or ‘Kids Of America’. Hence why we’re not doing covers right now.

10 Where do you envisage the band being in five years time?

We’ll still be writing and playing, whether that’s in a local pub or selling out Arenas across the globe remains to be seen.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

I can’t talk for the other members, but I would love to sing a duet with Kevin Rowland. Most of my hero’s have sadly passed, but he is one man I really admire. I true artist and a great performer.

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Our first single is about to appear on the new Acid Jazz compilation, ‘Hipsters: Volume 2’, released early April. Then we’re back in the studio in April to record our follow up single. You can catch us headlining on Sat 12 March @ Cavendish Arms, Stockwell. It’s always a good night there, so make sure you check us out.

Links:
DFV Website
Dig For Victory on FACEBOOK

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Tags:, ,
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DozenQ – The Silver Factory

The Silver Factory was formed in early 2009, and the band is based in Derby, East Midlands,

UK. Members:  Fran (rhythm guitar, backing vox), Pete (lead vox/harmonica), Pablo (lead guitar), Luke (bass), Paul (drums).

From the outset the main musical aim for the band is melodic guitar-based pop music, focusing heavily on the fantastic jingle jangle of the electric 12-string, fused with plenty of vocals.  To date the band have released two self-funded EPs and two professional promo videos, and are in the process of making their debut album (hoping for a summer release if a suitable label is found) with a third promo video in the pipeline!

01 How did the band get together?

Fran had been amassing a collection of songs and wanted to form a band to get his songs to a wider audience. Plus I had a few songs of my own to add to the “pot!”  He already knew Pablo, so it was just a case of finding a rhythm section (easier said than done….!)  It took us a year to find the right people. Once we found Paul and Luke, that’s when I really thought we could do something special.

02 Where did your name come from?

From the Andy Warhol connection. We seem to share the same ideals (art/music) as Andy. Plus,it’s a great name anyway!

03 Who are your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

The band has got a very eclectic and varied taste in bands and music in all its weird and wonderful forms! I could write pages just on this question alone, but the main three bands that we share the same thread are:- The Byrds, The Stone Roses and Love. You won’t get me telling you who I despise I’m afraid!

04 What drives you to make music together?

Just a shared love of the whole process of being in a band. It’s great fun and fulfilling on so many levels, and it can be quite lucrative if you are extremely lucky!

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live show?

First and foremost, we sound pretty much the same as our recordings live. We try to be as tight as possible (therefore plenty of rehearsing) I’d like to think we look pretty good? We think the image is very important. A bit of friendly banter with the audience is always good too. If you’re looking to see the guitar players with their legs draped on the monitors with a fag dangling from the side of the mouth, or the singer half naked, smearing himself in peanut butter… well we’re not that kind of band!

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

Myself and Fran write all the songs. We write about our lives in real and abstract ways. A bit of Oscar Wilde for good measure too.

07 How has your music evolved since you first began playing together?

I was listening to some demos we recorded last year,and i am very pleased in our steady progress. I wouldn’t say we’ve evolved. As from the outset, we knew exactly the dynamic we wanted to achieve. Obviously as individual musicians, as long as you put in the hours, you’ll improve as a band and as a musician!

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Too many really. Being in a band is a gift as much as a challenge. We’ve got high ambitions, so the obstacles tend not to get in the way. We’ve had our fair share of bad luck in our tenure. Shit happens!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We never play covers! What’s the point? We want to record our own music. We like to jam along to 12 bar blues sometimes (in our reheasal room). So that must cover at least a million songs!

10 Where do you envisage the band being in five years time?

Split up, probably!

11 Who would you most like to record with?

I’d love to have John Leckie produce and record us. That’d be nice!

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Hopefully we’ll carry on recording our brand of pop music, and some more colourful band videos. Hopefully some gigs too. That’s my personal favourite part about being in a band. I hope we find a sympathetic outlet to get our music out there. As we’ve got at least 2 albums worth of material ready to go!

Links:

MYSPACE

Links to two promo videos on youtube:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayFBgpM1qUw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6kcN7dgkPc

Links to youtube pages with live clips on:-

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : DozenQ Indie Modernist Tags:, ,
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