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The Orders – Big Foot (Single)

Something is hunting me, rushing through the dark midnight woods I am stumbling, in a dream state, nothing seems to make sense anymore. I can hear the thundering sound of a Big Foot getting closer and closer. I can now see a Shack appearing to the front of me, near the cliff edge, the dense forest is now opening up and leading me to the glowing door. The stars are zipping around passing me in dazzling bright hues. The moon glares back at me knowingly. I grab the door handle, yanking it hard, I am suddenly in. I am blinded instantly by the light and the sounds of The Orders, a fine, young band from the Isle of Wight (UK) who are surrounded by candles, oil lamps, strobes and with strange daubs of occultist scribbles and ultra-violet type paint, they are making exquisite drifting chimes provided by guitar and lead warbler Kyle Chapman, punctured with happy stabs of snotty-garage punked-up psych with rumbling bass via Isaac Snow and a thundering groovy beats from Josh Edwards bashing the skins like a monster. Their latest single with mini midnight movie is ready for your aural pleasure. It is fresh yet classic, with rings of strong indie nu-pyschedelia, it has art and mystery in all the right places. These fine young chaps recently kept great company in the shape of the mighty Monochrome Set at a recent Newport show, and BBC6 have already been drooling over this current release. Things are afoot, in fact, things are gonna be Big (Foot). We predict great monster adventures ahead. This unit can fill that huge gap in the modern music mainstream with their dreamy-pop sense. Big Foot is indeed coming and availabe now to download via the links below. So get on the ‘Big Foot Trail’ and feel free to tell your crew about The Orders

DOWNLOAD VIA ITUNES

DOWNLOAD VIA SPOTIFY

 

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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July 13, 2017 By : Category : Dark Eyeplugs Front page Garage Modern Modernist Picks Psychedelic Tags:, ,
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HEY DJ! – Miss Chelle

Miss Chelle is a youthful Islander (thats the Isle of Wight folks by the way) born and bred, owns a 1968 Lambretta and spins 45’s covering R&B, Soul, Northern, Boogaloo and Jazz. It all started after laughing at a friends’ cat in a record box and saying it’s probably a better DJ than she. Since then she’s collected and played. Despite being Island based it hasn’t stopped her spinning tunes in Nottingham, Birmingham, London and more recently Hembsy Soul Weekender. She is now a regular for Hipshaker at the Isle of Wight festival, this will be her 8th year entertaining the crowds.

01. What were your early musical influences?

I remember as a child the fear I felt when my dad played his War of the Worlds album, then the same feeling with Tubular Bells. He must have played the Who but I don’t remember it but clearly later in life my subconscious does as I knew all the songs they played at the Isle of Wight Festival 2004 and was shocked people around me claimed not to know any of their songs. My mum was a ‘Skinhead’ in the 70s and always reminds me that her first record was the Liquidator. It’s all in my genes! Once getting into the Who and Small Faces is made me look into other types of 60s music, and that has never stopped as I’m now slipping into the 50s!

02. What sort of music do your gravitate towards generally?

I will always lean towards R&B from the 50s and 60s, it covers a wide span of emotions and tempos. Something dark and gritty for those days where you feel everything is against you to something upbeat and happy when getting ready for a night out. I want a song to spark an emotion and I always remember the songs that gave me goose bumps when hearing them for the first time. When I first started digging into 60s sounds, Soul and Northern Soul were the genres I leant towards, like now, it was and still is the most spoken about. I still have my favourites.

03. What have been the bands or sounds that have always been in your play-list or record box?

Artists I will always have in my record box span from Barbara Lynn, Little Willie John, Etta James, Big Maybelle, Gay Poppers and my guilty pleasure Frankie Valli and the 4 Seasons. When not playing to a crowd I will listen to anything from Shocking Blue, the Small Faces, France Gall, Jazz compilations and Funk.

04. What about the formats available, your thoughts on Vinyl, CD and MP3?

When I DJ, I play vinyl only, I’m not a complete label snob as I don’t have the funds to spend £1000 on a single unfortunately. I have played at nights where I have been the only DJ to be using vinyl, which I don’t mind, it’s my choice. But to have someone boast about what songs they have on their laptop, can be a little soul destroying (pardon the pun!). Really, what it all boils down to is if you can judge a crowd and piece a number of different songs together to entertain them. But for many, searching and buying records is part of the musical passion. There’s no better feeling of finding a record you’ve wanted for ages.

05. Any current bands or acts that you feel seem to be producing the goods?

Current bands that have caught my attention include Kitty, Daisy and Lewis. First witnessed them live at the Bestival years ago, when I found out that all their material is recorded on 50s equipment I was even more impressed. Also love what Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings are doing. Away from the retro sound I like listening to London Grammar, McAlmont and Butler, Hozier and Bad Bad Not Good. Also like what Public Service Broadcasting do.

06. What can we expect to hear on your show or during your Sets?

I’m slowly starting to play more rock and roll in some of my sets as it goes well with a few of the R&B songs I play. Last year I played at a local rock and roll night and I had people dancing away, so the choice of songs couldn’t have been that bad. It was quite daunting playing to a different crowd. This has encouraged me to delve into the rock and roll world but I will never leave my R&B and Soul at home.

07. Anything that you really hate and why?

I wouldn’t say I hate, but what I have grown tired of is DJ’s trying to outdo each other and play what is considered a really rare record. A few years ago a group of us went to a Northern Soul all-nighter, we had travelled a fair few miles and were up for some dancing. Unfortunately the DJ’s were more concerned with each other than what was going on with the crowd. That and people shouting ‘you’re rubbish’, ‘I don’t like this song’ or ‘what do you mean you haven’t got The Snake, call yourself a DJ!’

08. What about requests?

I do try and fulfil requests if I have the song. Most of the time I’ll be polite and say I’ll play it if it fits in with what I’m currently playing. I’ve been in bizarre situations whilst behind the decks, I’ve had people tell me to play Motown whilst a Motown song is playing. I’ve been asked for Beyonce or NDubz due to R&B being advertised. I can’t complain about people requesting songs, I’ve done it myself.

09. Tell us what you are up to at the moment, where can we catch you playing out etc.?

Well, after a successful March of the Mods on the Island this year I’m giving a helping hand with  the IOW Lambretta Day. Fingers crossed I’m allowed to spin some tunes this year, last year I was renamed DJ Ironside as I was DJ’ing from a wheelchair. Not the best set up. After that, the next big date for me is the Isle of Wight Festival. This is my 8th year playing in the Hipshaker tent for the Festival Forum Hour. I really feel I have proved myself over the years by earning this slot, I get to play some upbeat tunes and hopefully open people’s eyes to what 60s music can do. Always have people dancing and that’s the best feeling to walk away with. Even better when people come up to you and tell you they enjoyed your set, it’s strange, I’m just playing songs I like and would dance to, for others to enjoy it as much is a big confidence boost.

10. Your thoughts on the future and things that excite you beyond music?

The future, I don’t think the music will ever die. Films are being released showing a small insight into the Soul Scene and here on the Island (IOW, UK) there are a good group of teenagers getting into Soul and Scooters. So hopefully it won’t die off any time soon. Outside of music I like to keep myself busy, do a spot of road cycling which has seen me cycle the 80 hilly miles between Bath and Bournemouth, the Island’s randonee and two years ago 100 Here, 100 There. A charity event supported by the Fire and Rescue Service, I’ve got a horrible feeling I’ll be roped into doing it again this year. I really enjoy photography, whether it’s nature and wildlife, to modern structures in London, to European destinations. I also try my hand at paper cutting. I’ve managed to sell a few commission pieces which has been great.

11. Have you met or worked with anyone Interesting on your musical journey?

Many years ago I worked at Ryde and Medina Theatre which meant meeting some of the acts that were booked. I called Georgie Fame, ‘some ol’ drunk’ not realising who he was, Jet Harris was a regular at Medina Theatre and was lovely, always recognised the bar staff. Bumped into Pauline Black and shared her prawn crackers in Ryde Theatre’s dressing room, also took Roddy Byers out drinking in Ryde and left him on the steps of Yelf’s after forgetting the key code. I’ve kept in touch with both of them and they really helped me by donating some great prizes for our March of the Mods raffle. I also had the fortune, or some would say misfortune of meeting Eddie Piller, apparently I don’t look like someone from the Isle of Wight. And ever since I have returned the favour with banter whenever our paths meet.

12. Top fave tunes right now and fave other current DJ?

A very small list of my favourites at the moment;
Betty Everett  – Someday Soon.
Jamie Coe – Cleopatra.
Sugarpie DeSanto – Going Back to Where I Belong.
Big Maybelle – That’s a Pretty Good Love.
The Pointer Sisters – Send Him Back
Fred Hughes – Baby Boy.

Don’t know if I have a favourite DJ, if they play tunes that make me dance I’m happy. Always try to tune into Craig Charles on BBC6 when I remember. I’ve met some great people over the years through attending different events which makes it hard to choose, but I do have Secondhand Dan to thank for the ‘Miss Chelle’ label, now he does have an amazing record collection that I can only dream of!

Links:

www.facebook.com/groups

www.twitter.com/DJmisschelle

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

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April 21, 2015 By : Category : DJs Interviews Music Tags:,
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808 State @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 12 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

808 State are a British electronic music outfit, formed in 1987 in Manchester, taking their name from the Roland TR-808 drum machine and their common state of mind.

Please see the great interview below, answered by Graham Massey from the band.

808 State Interview, Graham Massey from the Band:

1. What are your earliest memories of getting bitten by the music bug?

The family record player. We actually did have a wind up 78 that my Dad would drop Gracie Fields records on. Then we upgraded to a Dancette 3 speed. My Brothers and I took turns getting a 7 inch each week. Beatle mania ensued, The Shadows instrumentals, popular classical on 7 inch EPs. One of my first 7 inches was a freebie with Action Man. I used to like the sound fx side, just war noises That might be telling?

The Radio was always on around meal times. I remember it was a mix of Brit groups and older stuff like Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald.

2. Was your family background musical in any way?

Not wildly. We had a piano. My brother had lessons and had sheet music to Rolling Stones and Kinks records. I used to do a version of Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001 fanfare) with my fists. I could also do it on mouth organ, there was no applause or accolades.

Next door had an arch top guitar, I had a banjo uke’ and there was some occasional Skiffle in a shed. I remember having a go on a relatives electric organ, that may have been formative in that “reverb” seemed to be the missing link to the space age, which coloured everything for me back in the 60s, terribly exciting futures awaited us on other worlds, all sound-tracked with electronic tones.

3. What were your original influences and how have they changed over time?

One of the first inroads into music was through getting a cassette recorder at the age of 12. It was the must have item for boys in 72. You used to record chart run downs off your radio or Top Of The Pops off the TV by shoving a microphone in front of said devices. Recordings of TV Adverts and theme tunes, you could do fake Michael Parkinson interviews with your mates and then any musical activity you could dream up with what ever you had… Stylophones, electronic project kits. Woolworth’s reed organs seemed to be universal.

There were books in the library that talked of the afore mentioned electronic space tones “Experimental Music” with interesting pictures of La Monte Young, Terry Riley ,Cage etc. There was a notion of “avant garde” that appealed and became supported when I got into Virgin records budget vinyl like Faust Tapes and Gongs “Camembert Electrique”, and Hawkwind etc in the mid 70s.

Punk was a game changer for me, or rather Post Punk, because you could take electronic and experimental influences from Prog & Spacerock and marry that to mad energy. It was also a form of music that addressed clubs and dance floor culture, disco and technology.

When we formed 808 State it wasn’t just about a love of abstract US dance music, it was as much about an exploration of emerging music technology. Samplers were a key revolutionary instrument. The technology was the common syntax but the accent was a blend of experiences that you tend to get in a place like Manchester. The UK urban thing is a different packet of seeds to the US or European counterpart. It’s why you can still mix an early 90’s “Shut Up And Dance” record with Dubstep. The relay race isn’t over yet. The UK sound is easy to spot in the global mush of your modern dance floor. There’s no software for style but I think most people can’t help but respond when they hear it.

4. Have you ever been to the Isle Of Wight?

Yes, 808 State played Bestival in 2008 and I also played Bestival with The Sisters Of Transistors in 2010. We got lost trying to find the Festival site… some locals had taken all the signs down or pointed them in the wrong directions.

5. Tell us about your live sound?

We are currently a five piece live band. Darren does MCing with decks and percussion, Andrew and I do the synths and we run a MacBook Pro using Logic to a fireface sound card with multiple outs. We use a bunch of old analogue keyboards like Moogs and Rolands. I also do guitars and sax. We have Paddy Steer on Bass Guitar, he’s a very interesting and great musician whom I’ve collaborated with on many projects. We also have Carl Sharrocks on Drums; I spotted him playing with a tech group called Sirconical a few years back. He can lock on like an Exocet and it turns out he grew up listening to our stuff and knows it like the back of his hand.

6. How has your sound changed over the years?

It has just grown with the technology of the times. I guess we’ve been having a relationship with technology long enough to realize that “new” isn’t always better, which is why we still use a lot of analogue synths and an element of live instruments along side the computers.

Computers are way more powerful & reliable for stage use now. When I look back they were such a struggle throughout the 90’s, crashing and sticking, never being able to trust the timing, it could send you demented. We are an odd combination of DJ crew and band that grew organically from having to present a studio product live and keep it exciting on stage. It can get messy, we are a sweaty techno band, not really in the Kraftwerk mould.

7. What have been the high points of your career?

I think we were lucky to ride the big wave of Rave when it first happened in late 80’s. It was a very exciting time in music as a whole, and we were allowed to freely be creative with a positive back up in that it was all valid. We had a audience that wasn’t niche, it was Pop and Edge at the same time. High points are always about moment of creation, you might not always have people ready to listen. It was great when that process was immediate.

8. And the low-points?

We made all kinds of daft decisions, but what do you want Snow Patrol?

9. What about the present day set up?

We are all still active in areas of music, a lot of archiving going on in recent years as you have to over see that your music is digitally converted properly – that’s a big job with a back catalogue like ours.

Our website 808state.com will keep you up to date on current projects. Andy & Darren go out and DJ a lot as 808 State Sound System, they also do a new web radio show on Beatwolf.com which is far from your usual dry dance radio fayre. They’ve always had a natural flair for radio. I’m quite often on Freakier Zone on BBC6 Music… It’s a program about “outsider music” or trainspotter “up it” music depending on your stance.

10. Thoughts on today’s music scene?

I think everybody has their own music scene, it’s not centralized through the media anymore. Internet hype, out of touch print and other media has diminished trust, word of mouth and faith in music as an uplifting force and will always prevail.

Keeping ears expectant is the current dilemma. You need all your basic music food groups: quiet reflective music, body punching loud abandon, mystery, history, community, appreciation of dynamic sound. Few places have a decent sound these days. We should give ratings to a venue for sound quality, or simply gather as groups around quality sound systems to recalibrate what it means. Your brain shuts off to music if you don’t tickle it the right way.

11. What can we expect for your WOWFest 2012 Show?

You can expect to put your hands in the air. You will be shouted at with considerable amplification. You will suffer abdominal sub bass cramps that will be followed by involuntary euphoria.

Websites
808 State Website
808 State on Facebook
808 State on Twitter
808 State on YouTube

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Beats Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Hype Media News Tags:, , , ,
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Baka Beyond @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 10 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

After 20 years of mixing African and Celtic music in equal measures Baka Beyond have become one of the finest danceable bands around, creating the sound of the African global village.

Not just a touring band, Baka Beyond have a unique relationship with their inspiration – the Baka Pygmies of Cameroon – sending royalties to help their development projects, and even touring with Baka musicians.

Baka Beyond was founded in 1992 after British musicians Martin Cradick and Su Hart had visited the Baka Pygmies of the Cameroon rainforests after seeing a TV documentary. So inspired were they by their magical rhythms and melodies that they recorded an album “Spirit of the Forest” under the name Baka Beyond which pushed them into worldwide recognition.

In order to make sure that the Baka get their fair return for their compositions they also founded the charity, “Global Music Exchange”. So started this very positive African – European collaboration.

Since these early beginnings when the term “world music” barely existed, Baka Beyond has evolved into a multicultural, dynamic live stage show and album sales top a quarter of a million copies. Band members hail from Brittany, Cameroon, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Congo and Ghana as well as Britain. Each musician brings their own influence and talent to the music creating a unique spectacle and honoring a lesson learned from the Baka people, “everyone is to be listened to”.

Baka Beyond’s years of touring have paid off. The energy of their thoroughly uplifting and seamless blend of African rhythm and Celtic melody defies anybody to sit still. They recently headlined Edmonton Folk Festival and wowed the 15,000 strong crowd, most of whom were new to the magic of Baka Beyond.

The band digitally released their new album ‘Kisumani’ in Spring 2012 and there will be a ‘physical’ release in the Summer.

For selected shows the band will be joined on vocals by Molara, Fela Kuti’s niece and the original voice of dub dance pioneers, Zion Train. Ghanaian percussionist, Nii Tagoe provides the rhythm section along with Tim Robinson and Congolese bass player Kibisingo Douglas (of Kanda Bongo Man). All of this is very much tied together by the energy of Paddy le Mercier ‘s Bretagne fiddle and Martin Cradick’s hypnotic guitar, recently described as sounding like ‘Jerry Garcia after a long trip in West Africa’.

Baka Beyond Interview, Martin Cradick from the Band:

1. What are your earliest memories of getting bitten by the music bug?

Although I had piano lessons at the age of 8 or 9, I wasn’t really enthusiastic about music until hearing someone play guitar and sing a song around a campfire when I was on holiday aged 12. I got a cheap classical guitar and started teaching myself for a year until I had classical guitar lessons at school. After Grade 5 (at age around 15) the pieces got more intellectual and boring to my ears and I gave up formal lessons and started playing electric guitar in bands.

2.Was your family background musical in any way?

The only music played at home was Christmas Carols at christmas time. Apart from that my Mum would constantly hum “busy bee” tunes while doing the housework. I don’t think she was ware of it and it is probably responsible for my affinity to improvised tunes that doodle on and on without going anywhere – “as directionless as a runaway shopping trolly” as one reviewer once said! I found that there were quite a lot of people who actually liked that sort of music!
My grandmother’s sister (who I never met, was a concert pianist in Australia, and the first woman to write a piece of music for a brass band apparently, and her mother was trained as a concert pianist but damaged her hand before she could take it up as a career. So I suppose there is some musical ability in my genes.

3. What were you original influences and how have they changed over time?

When I first started playing guitar my elder sister was going out with someone in a progressive rock band so I heard the records she had – Genesis, Yes, Camel etc. The first album I bought was Aladdin Sane ny David Bowie, but it was the music of Can that actually influenced me most at that time – the philosophy that great music comes by accident from improvisation.
After that it was mostly live music that influenced me. I saw (and jammed with) a reggae band at Stonehenge Free Festival (probably about 1979/1980) and I realised that if you mixed improvisation with music that people danced to it made it more accessible.

I was busking in Paris on my 21st birthday and heard Fela Cuti. The first time I had heard African music and it had an immediate resonance with me.

Travelling to South America in 1988, and hearing the bands at the Baranquilla Carnival in Columbia was influential. None of them had a drum kit, but they all had all the parts of the drum kit played by different people creating a totally different feel.

At the time I was co-running a music club in Oxford (The Madhatter’s Club). It had recently been closed down due to neighbour’s complaints, and being the last music venue in town (the council having already closed all the others down) we kicked up a huge fuss and eventually were allowed to stay open and even get support from the council. People who know the Oxford music scene now wouldn’t recognise that kind of attitude from the council who now can’t do enough to help live music. We had to really fight to set the ground for that.

The biggest influence has of course been Su’s and my visit to the Baka in 1992. (I’ve been going ever since – every year at least once now since 2000, and a few times before then). That is the influence that gives the sound to our current band. Not necessarily totally in the sound we produce, but in the spirit of the music. All grooving together to create a positive vibe.

4. Have you ever been to the Isle Of Wight?

Yes.

5. Tell us about your live sound?

African based rhythms underlying a mixture of Celtic, African and improvised melodies. Dance/Trance music with a positive vibe and many influences from traditional music in Africa and Celtic fringes of Europe.

6. How has your sound changed over the years?

It shifts and changes quite organically, depending to a certain extent on which musicians are playing as we try to make a space for each person’s style. The albums have mainly been studio based and end up being quite a different entity to the live show. This year we are going back to a more “traditional Baka Beyond sound” with pretty much the lineup of 2000 – Eleanor has joined us this summer again on vocals after a gap of 12 years.

7. What have been the high points of your career?

Probably playing to 20,000 people on a saturday night on the main stage at Edmonton Festival in Canada (view on youtube Here) Also bringing 7 Baka musicians over from Cameroon to tour with us in 2012.

8. And the low-points?

Spending most of last year recording a new album and then having to shelve it due to the band members all falling out. Partly due to me trying to learn not to be a control freak and failing dismally. We live and learn and as Jimmy Cliff says, “you’ve gotta walk and don’t look back”

9. What about the present day set up?

Back to “traditional Baka Beyond”. Drums, African percussion, positive vibes and highly danceable rhythms (but you can just lie back and let it all take you away, if that’s what you prefer).

10. Thoughts on today’s music scene?

I’ve been spending a lot of time in Africa recently and to be honest am not that in touch with what’s current as far as radio etc is concerned. I’ve always been far more interested in live music, and that seems really exciting at the moment. What I find really striking is that so many young bands seem to be playing music very similar to the music bands I was in in the early ’80s were playing, although at the time most bands we knew then thought we were crazy and hopelessly out of touch!

11. What’s in the pipeline for the future?

I’ve just finished mixing and mastering an album I recorded in Cameroon in February. Its a follow up to Baka Gbiné’s album “Gati Bongo” (tThe title track of which has just been selected to be on a new Zumba Dance video game!). The Baka musicians have formed a really tight rhythm section and the music sounds great. I would like to help them tour in the Cameroon next year and then come to Europe in 2014.

 12. What can we expect for your WOWFest 2012 Show?

Energetic infectious rhythms, beautiful harmonies, dancing feet and happy faces all around you.

Websites

Baka Beyond
Myspace
Facebook
Twitter
Youtube

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype Media News Tags:, , , ,
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Talisman @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 7 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

Talisman were one of the UK’s top Roots Reggae bands in the later 70’s and early 80’s.The band’s prowess earned them support slots with acts as diverse as Burning Spear, The Clash and The Rolling Stones. They have reformed with the original line up after 30 years apart to support the re-release of their classic roots single ‘Dole Age’ on a brand new album ‘Dole Age – The 1981 Reggae Collection’. One of Bristol’s finest live acts are back and ready to party once again.

Originally formed in 1977 Talisman were consummate performers constantly vying for the title of one of the country’s most popular live reggae bands. They toured the UK building up a loyal following and leaving memories of gigs that are still discussed to this day.

Until now the only way to hear Talisman has been to track down their two difficult to find singles from 1981, or their two later LPs, “Takin’ The Strain” from 1984 and “Jam Rock” From 1990. Now after nearly thirty years Bristol Archive Records have lovingly compiled this CD of the band at their peak in 1981. Not only does the CD contain the band’s two original 7” singles, but also eight carefully selected live cuts from classic shows at Glastonbury Festival and other infamous shows.

Hot on the heels of the critically acclaimed ‘The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978- 1983’ Bristol Archive Records release ‘Dole Age – The 1981 Reggae Collection’ celebrated at their first Bristol show for 20 years at The Fleece in Bristol on 27th May 2011.

March 2012 sees the band re-release their first album “Takin’ the Strain”, originally release in 1984, as a CD (Deluxe Edition) and Digital Download. The nine tracks showcase variety and even include a soul tune, the Deluxe Edition also includes five live bonus tracks.

Talisman Interview, with Dennison from the Band:

1. What are your earliest memories of getting bitten by the music bug?

At the age of 15 I saw a guy at school playing  Jumpin’ Jack Flash’ on a acoustic guitar. I thought to myself ….I can do that.

2.Was your family background musical in any way?

In church I could hear the tones of my mother’s voice when she sang.

3. What were you original influences and how have they changed over time?

  • Listening to the radio at an early age in the Caribbean, mainly Country and Western from the US. I was hooked by the harmonies.
  •   In short, I have found my singing voice.

4. Have you ever been to the Isle Of Wight?

No.

5. Tell us about your live sound?

Roots and Culture for the mind, laced with humour.

6. How has your sound changed over the years?

We know what we’re doin’ now.

7. What have been the highpoint’s of your career?

Receiving messages from people saying how Talisman helped to shape their lives.

8. And the low-points?

The band breaking up too early.

9. What about the present day set up?

A more mature and seasoned approach to our musical direction.

10. Thoughts on today’s music scene?

There are good some messengers out there.

11. What’s in the pipeline for the future?

New music.

12. What can we expect for your WOWFest 2012 Show?

Good music…Good vibes.

Websites

Talisman
Facebook
Myspace

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype News Reggae Tags:, , , ,
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Black Roots @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 6 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

Black Roots were a powerful and potent force in the British reggae music scene throughout the 80’s and left a legacy of no less than ten albums and more than eight singles before bowing out of the public eye in the mid-90’s. Hailing from the St Paul’s area of Bristol, the original eight-member band were formed in 1979 and quickly gained a large following by touring almost non-stop around the country, playing their brand of ‘militant pacifism’ roots.

Their debut album “Black Roots” released in 1983 was a highly acclaimed debut for Black Roots and saw them make their mark immediately on the national music scene. Their second album “The Frontline” included the title track “The Frontline” which had been composed at the request of BBC TV for a new television comedy series of the same name. Black Roots’ fourth album “All Day All Night” was produced by Mad Professor. The album “Live Power” was recorded at a gig at the Moles Club in Bath on 22 September 1988, which came about after fans asked for a live album, seeking to capture the power and strength of Black Roots’ tight, vibrant and entertaining stage performance.

In 1991 Black Roots and Neil Fraser released “Dub Factor: The Mad Professor Mixes” along with Black Steel and the horn section from the All Day All Night album. The tenth and final album “Dub Factor 3: Dub Judah & Mad Professor Mixes” released in 1995 finally brought the curtain down on Bristol’s finest exponents of reggae and without doubt, one of Britain’s best loved performing bands of the Eighties.

“If anyone tells you that there is no such thing as good British reggae, first tell them that they are a herbert and then listen to Black Roots.” – John Peel

Black Roots Interview, with Jabulani from the Band:

1. What are your earliest memories of getting bitten by the music bug?

My earliest memory was listening to a radio competition on RGA in Jamaica in the 60’s with artists such as the Wailers, Toots and the Maytals and so on.

2.Was your family background musical in any way?

No, only singing in church.

3. What were you original influences and how have they changed over time?

My original influences were by the Wailers and Burning Spear and over the years it’s more or less the same because I’m a roots man at heart.

4. Have you ever been to the Isle Of Wight?

I’ve never been but I would like to because I’ve heard that they will have a great festival this summer 🙂

5. Tell us about your live sound?

Our sound is a mixture of roots, melodic, spiritual and uplifting.

6. How has your sound changed over the years?

From militants to middle age spiritual fulfillment.

7. What have been the highpoint’s of your career?

Touring Europe with UB40 in the late 80’s.

8. And the low-points?

When we had a break.

9. What about the present day set up?

The 6 original members and 5 new additions that complete the jigsaw.

10. Thoughts on today’s music scene?

Very computerised without the sense of human feel.

11. What’s in the pipeline for the future?

We have a new album coming out in September and a tour coming to promote the album in the new year.

12. What can we expect for your WOWfest 2012 Show?

You will see Black Roots in a new rock reggae style with reggae at its heights, the way reggae should be played.

Websites

Black Roots
Facebook
Myspace

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype News Reggae Tags:, , , ,
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Kitten and The Hip @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 5 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

Take a beautiful and fantastic singer, add a world class horn section and some pumping backing tracks. Throw in some electro swing, some R & B, a bit of camp disco, a dollop of drum and bass a smidge of dubstep, add some brilliant hooky pop songs and there you pretty much have it, Kitten and The Hip.

One year ago, Ashley Slater met Kitten Quinn. Ashley was an ex pop star (Freak Power) and Kitten was a beautiful and intelligent singer songwriter. They wrote songs together, they hung out, and they mischiefed. But mostly, they wrote great songs together.

In February, they were having a chat, and Kitten advised Ashley not to worry about something. ‘Don’t You Worry’ was born the next day. A demo was sent to Carl Hanaghan, head of A & R at HedKandi records in London. Less than half an hour later, the phone rang at Kitten HQ, the deal was made, the record was signed and the ball of yarn started rolling.

The single was release in September and has already created a significant noise on the Electro Swing scene. Another of Kitten’s tracks ‘By My Side’ has been signed to ‘Bart and Baker present Electro Swing 4’, which was released November 7th 2011 on Wagram Paris.

Live, they are a quintet, with Kitten singing and Ashley and three brass monkeys playing horns. Kitten is a natural onstage, at once mesmerising and seductive.

It’s a party with class, so don’t forget your ass!

Kitten and The Hip Interview:

1. What are your earliest memories of getting bitten by the music bug?

Kitten: I started dancing at 3 years old and then got into musical theatre at an early age as well. I think that explain some of the theatricality of our music.

2.Was your family background musical in any way?

The Hip: My dad played almost any stringed instrument, my mom couldn’t carry tune if it was in a bucket. Bless.

3. What were your original influences and how have they changed over time?

Kitten: I love pop music. I’ve always been into great modern female singers like Lauryn Hill and Whitney Houston, all of the big divas. I also listened to a lot of country folk and rock when I was younger.

4. Have you ever been to the Isle Of Wight?

The Hip: Indeed I have. I’ve guest lectured at Platform One College a few times and what a lovely institution that is.

5. Tell us about your live sound?

Kitten: It’s a big sound because we use backing tracks as well as live musicians. Very heavy bass and beats, so it works well in a club. Obviously, there’s a lot of singing, I like to layer up bf’s forever… And then I sing out over the top of all this, which can be quite a challenge.

6. How has your sound changed over the years?

The Hip: Well, we’re only one year old but our sound has gone through quite a few changes already. We’re still looking for the ideal live sound, we’ve gone form having backing tracks with three horns to doing lot of duo gigs with backing tracks to our current line-up, which is Kitten, me, drums and guitar. And…backing tracks. In the studio, our sound is defined by Kitten’s voice.

7. What have been the highpoints of your career?

Kitten: Well, my career has only just started, but I’ve had my share of high times already. We did a gig in Ostrava last year standing in for another band. There were 3,000 people in a room who had never heard of us, but we rocked that room for an hour and made a lot of friends. We also had a memorable gig in Paris where we had a few half naked men crawling all over the stage. Kind of weird…

8. And the low-points?

The Hip: Haha. You haven’t got enough space for that, but there have been a few.

9. What about the present day set up?

Kitten: I sing, The Hip sings and plays trombone (not at the same time) we have a guitarist called Duncan Wilson who is a mental and a drummer called Gillan McLaughlin who needs a good spanking!

10. Thoughts on today’s music scene?

The Hip: I think it’s better than ever. There’s always a layer of scum floating on the top of anything, but dig down a little bit and music is vibrant, interesting and very much alive.

11. What’s in the pipeline for the future?

Kitten: We have an album ready to go and are looking for the right partners to work with to release it. There’s a single coming out on Freshly Squeezed quite soon (it may be out by the time you read this). Basically, our goal is to be huge and that’s what’s going to happen!

12. What can we expect for your WOWFest 2012 Show?

The Hip: Great songs, great players and a great time.

Websites
Kitten and The Hip
Soundcloud
Facebook

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Front page Gigs Hype News Reggae Tags:, , , ,
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Neville Staple @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 4 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

Best known as singer, toaster and composer with The Specials, and as one of the founding members of Fun Boy 3, Neville Staple is credited with changing the face of pop music not only once but twice.

Catch his show these days, and you’ll get a mix of old favourites from The Specials/Fun Boy three back catalogue plus choice solo releases.

Neville’s first involvement with The Specials was when they were still called The Coventry Automatics. He initially joined as their roadie but at a gig supporting The Clash, Neville took to the stage and never looked back. For a while, The Clash’s manager Bernard Rhodes managed The Specials. Neville used to toast of Bernie, “Bernie Rhodes knows. Don’t argue” at the beginning of the Specials hit single “Gangsters”.

When The Specials split up, Neville departed with Terry Hall and Lynval Golding, to form Fun Boy Three. They had a string of chart hits, some in collaboration with the all- female trio Bananarama.

It was officially confirmed on the 7 April 2008 that the Specials were to reform, and on the 6 September 2008, six members of the band performed on the Main Stage at the Bestival billed as the ‘Surprise Act’. By December 2008, the band had announced 2009 tour dates to celebrate their 30th anniversary. Throughout 2010 the band played many festival dates and toured the USA in the early autumn. After which Neville returned to the UK with a string of dates with his own incredibly tight band. 2011 saw Neville play various festivals including Glastonbury and Beatherder, also supporting Madness.

Neville’s autobiography, THE ORIGINAL RUDE BOY, was published by Aurum Press in the UK in May 2009.

Websites

www.nevillestaple.co.uk
www.myspace.com/nevillestaplefromthespecials
www.facebook.com/nevillestaplefromthespecials

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 16, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype News Reggae Tags:, , , ,
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The Selecter @WOWfest 2012

This entry is part 3 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

The Selecter® – Starring Pauline Black & Arthur ‘Gaps” Hendrickson

“Too Much Pressure” released by this important and influential platinum selling band in Feb 1980 remains a classic touchstone for a generation of Ska lovers and the band are excited to announce they will be playing the album in its entirety plus a selection of other much loved Selecter tracks and some new surprises at concerts throughout 2011.

Mixing punk, ska and reggae, ‘Too Much Pressure’ successfully reflected the social and political issues of the early Thatcher years in Britain and gave a voice to disaffected youth across the racial divide.

The Selecter® fronted by the original singing duo of the female icon of the 2-Tone era Pauline Black & Arthur ‘Gaps’ Hendrickson deliver classic hits like ‘Three Minute Hero’, ‘Missing Words’, ‘On My Radio’, ‘James Bond’ and of course ‘Too Much Pressure’. New Selecter Album ‘Made In Britain’ & Pauline Black’s 2-Tone Memoir  ‘Black By Design’

2011 sees the return of one of the most vital, visceral and important Ska acts ever. Queen of 2-Tone, Pauline Black featured prominently in BBC4’s recent “Reggae Britannia” series, contributing to a 90 mins documentary and a live concert broadcast from The Barbican in London.

The Selecter® have written and recorded a new 10 track album ‘Made In Britain’, featuring covers of Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back To Black’ & a hugely popular anti-racist ska/reggae re-working of Woody Guthrie’s ‘All You Fascists Bound To Lose’  re-invented as ‘Big In The Body – Small In The Mind’, which is due for release in September 2011.

Discography 1979 – 2011

The Singles

1979 – On My Radio/Too Much Pressure [2-Tone]
1980 – Three Minute Hero/Carry Go Bring Come [2-Tone] 1980 – Missing Words/Street Feeling [2-Tone]
1980 – The Whisper/Train to Skaville [2-Tone]
1981 – Celebrate The Bullet/Last Tango in Dub [Chrysalis]

The Albums

1980 – Too Much Pressure [2-Tone]
1981 – Celebrate The Bullet [Chrysalis]
1992 – Out On The Streets Again [Triple X]
1993 – The Selecter® and Prince Buster (Madness) [Triple X] 1994 – The Happy Album (studio recording) [Triple X]
1995 – Pucker [Triple X]
1996 – Back Out On The Streets [Triple X]
1997 – The Very Best Of The Selecter® [Triple X]
1998 – Cruel Britannia [Snapper]
1999 – Trojan Songbook Vol 1 [Trojan]
2000 – Trojan Songbook Vol 2 [Trojan]
2001 – Trojan Songbook Vol3 [Trojan]
2002 – Unplugged For The Rudeboy Generation [Almafame] 2003 – Real To Reel [Captain Mod]

Visuals

1980 – Dance Craze [2Tone/Chrysalis Films] 1989 – Dance Craze [2Tone/ VHS]
2003 – Live In London [Secret Films/DVD]

Line Up

Lead Vox: Pauline Black
Lead Vox: Arthur “Gaps” Hendrickson
Drums: Winston Marche
Guitar: Anthony Harty
Keyboards: Greg Coulson
Bass: John Thompson
Horns: Neil Pyzer & Orlando LaRose

Websites

www.theselecter.net 
 www.paulineblack.com

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype News Reggae Tags:, , , ,
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Eyeplug.net invited to support WOWFest 2012!

This entry is part 1 of 13 in the series Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug.net are proud to announce their first ‘Live Events’ involvement with an invitation to provide Insider Media Coverage and our
‘Multi Mood-Machine’ DJ Sound Experience at this summer’s brightest new festival in August on the Isle of Wight – WOWfest,
a 3 day music extravaganza in Shanklin, from August 17th – 19th 2012, featuring some of the world’s top acts in what promises to be one of the most outstanding global parties of the year!

We will be keeping our loyal readers up to date with all of the  news and views and happenings and hope to lure a huge amount of you into coming along and joining in the fun which is in a wonderful and truly fab setting!

WOWfest is a festival whose time has truly come, and thousands are expected to snap up the best priced £99 early bird tickets, which are on sale from the event website: www.wowfest.co.uk

WOWfest, is also proud to partner with the following charities: Oxfam, Solar Aid, Building Schools for Africa, Sustrans, Vegfam and the IOW NHS Juba project.

Follow us on Twitter: #WOWfestIOW and Facebook: WOWfest. To receive WOWfest Newsletters, send your email address to enquiries@wowfest.co.uk.

More news to follow very soon!

Eyeplug@WOWFest

Eyeplug@WOWFest - Insider Media Coverage and the First Event Hook UP from the MULTI-MOOD-MACHINE SOUNDSYSTEM fro a new Festival taking place this August 2012 in Shanklin, Isle Of Wight in fab settings with a super dooper line up! Watch out for new, reviews, articles, insights, and general focus right up to the Event itself and beyond! Check out the WOWFest webiste and come along for the Party! Tickets Available Now!

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June 5, 2015 By : Category : Culture Events Eyeplugs Festivals Front page Gigs Hype Media News Tags:, ,
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