Menu

Browsing Tag newsfeed

Exhibitions Newsfeed

  • 6 August: Matisse in the Studio review – a few of his favourite things - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Royal Academy, London
    Pots, jugs, chairs, textiles… Matisse’s work is peopled by his beloved possessions, which in turn begin to look like Matisses in this beautifully cluttered journey into the artist’s mind

    At his wedding in 1898, Henri Matisse received a silver chocolate pot as a gift from a fellow painter. You can see this startling object at the Royal Academy. Low-bellied like a duck, it balances on three dainty feet and rises up, full-throated and almost comical, to a speaking beak of a spout.

    Which is exactly how it first appears in his art, described in quite conventional 19th-century style. But Matisse soon starts to paint the pot’s personality. Its handle sticks out like a bicyclist turning left, or lunges straight at the viewer – en garde! The silver beak opens and shuts. It appears in a flurry of wild blue arabesques, trying to stand fast like a sailor in a storm. Or it sits quietly beside the artist’s young daughter as she reads, keeping a kindly watch.

    A large Spanish vase, hands on hips like a tough Andalucian woman, squares up to us, bold and flirtatious

    Continue reading...
  • 4 August: The kinkiest art export, a hymn to breastfeeding, and Raphael's youthful genius – the week in art - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    A meditation on popcorn, women weavers celebrated, plus a terrifying portrait of a nation on the brink of disaster – all in your weekly dispatch

    Kate Davis
    Step into this Old Town gallery for a stimulating encounter with some original and powerful feminist video art, which includes a hymn to breastfeeding illuminated by a montage of medieval and Renaissance paintings.
    Stills Gallery, Edinburgh, until 8 October.

    Continue reading...
  • 4 August: What do our possessions say about us? – in pictures - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Japanese artist Mami Kiyoshi has spent 15 years creating vivid portraits of people surrounded by their belongings – from wine bottles and violins to the odd stray pet

    Continue reading...
  • 3 August: Cult cartoon star Mr Benn on brink of film stardom as he turns 50 - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Movie and opera about bowler-hatted fancy dress fan under consideration amid renewed interest in 70s children’s TV series

    He was a very ordinary man who could do extraordinary things, whether flying into space, taming a pirate, defending a dragon or, in a story rejected by the BBC, playing his part in postwar prison reform by helping to wallpaper dreary jail cells. And now, at 50, he may even be on the cusp of movie stardom.

    Mr Benn reaches his half century this year and will be celebrated in an exhibition showing, for the first time, original film cells from the fondly remembered BBC children’s series. Coming after that will be a range of upmarket pocket handkerchiefs and the possibility of a Mr Benn opera and a live action movie.

    Related: How we made cult cartoon Mr Benn

    Continue reading...
  • 2 August: Want to try slow tourism? First give up your guidebook - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Florence’s Uffizi Gallery wants to discourage casual visitors, promoting repeat visits at different times. It’s a noble aim: we should all learn to take our time

    Some people go to Florence and check off its sights before heading for a pizzeria in the city that does Italy’s worst pizza (really, try the lethally delicious local delicacy Lardo di Colonnata instead). Others feast so obsessively on art they make themselves sick. Overdoing it on the art of Florence is a recognised medical condition, called Stendhal syndrome, named after the pseudonym of French novelist Marie-Henri Beyle, who fainted from artistic overload here in the early 19th century.

    Now, Eike Schmidt, the director of the city’s Uffizi Gallery, wants to discourage the more superficial of its 2 million annual visitors, and, presumably, fill the city’s hospitals with exhausted aesthetes by changing how people visit Italy’s greatest art collection. He hopes to achieve this by changing ticket prices to reward repeat visits, including in the early mornings and off season, and punish people who “come in for a selfie in front of Botticelli’s Venus”, discouraging “hit-and-run tourism”.

    Related: 10 of the best ways to enjoy Florence … on a budget

    Continue reading...
  • 1 August: Unicorn lollies and six million avocados: our insatiable appetite for Instafood - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    As a new exhibition charts our obsession with photographing food, we look at the hottest dishes, the dark side of Instagrammed cupcakes and how social media is changing the way we eat

    We’ll never know what the photographer Irving Penn would have made of #foodporn. The master of still-life photography died in 2009, and Instagram wasn’t born until the following year.

    Instagram, of course, is the favoured social media outlet for photographs of food, and #foodporn is one of its most-used hashtags, with 130m posts and rising. Penn was doing it seven decades ago – memorable among his early images are Ingredients for a Beef Stew (1947-48); The Empty Plate (1949) and thereafter shots of steaks, lobsters, frogs’ legs and all manner of other good things. He even photographed a pizza (which is now the world’s most Instagrammed dish, followed by sushi, steak, burgers and bacon).

    For every smoothie bowl with forensically placed chia seeds there’s a boakworthy video of melted chocolate being slopped

    'Food pictures are about a million versions of the same thing,' says Danneman. Six million, when it comes to #avocado

    Continue reading...
  • 1 August: Edinburgh art festival review – follies, broken statues and a surprise star - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Various venues
    Douglas Gordon knocks Robert Burns off his pedestal and Pablo Bronstein goes gothic at Jupiter Artland. But it’s the video art of Stephen Sutcliffe and Kate Davis that delves deepest at this year’s festival

    In the soaring gothic entrance hall of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, big chunks of black marble are heaped on the ground in front of a glistening statue of the national poet Robert Burns. You recognise a leg, and see that Douglas Gordon has commissioned a jet black replica of John Flaxman’s white marble figure – then smashed it.

    The divided psyche haunts this Turner prize winner’s art, and Scottish literature. Robert Louis Stevenson, author of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, is among the worthies whose marble busts have been turned to the wall for this installation, as if they were looking away in disgust from the exposed inner darkness of Robert Burns.

    Continue reading...
  • 30 July: Edinburgh art festival review – the dark side of Robert Burns - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Various venues, Edinburgh
    A Pablo Bronstein folly, Rabbie in ruins and a fond Māori farewell are among this year’s standouts, while Inverleith House is sorely missed…

    Robert Burns stands tall, a white marble hero dominating the great hall of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh. He holds a scroll – as if Burns used parchment for his poems – and his plaid has become a classical toga. An ideal man, or so John Flaxman’s famous statue would have it back in 1824. But now look down and find his dark double – his exact inverse – lying broken on the floor. Carved out of black marble from the same mine, all his pristine aspects turned to night, the national poet is ruined and fallen. This is Douglas Gordon’s Black Burns.

    It is a shattering sight, not least because the monument is now unrecognisable. Head and body parted, Burns is a divided self. From the balcony above he looks like a fallen angel; on ground level, like mangled body parts jutting from a trench, one foot still polished like a dead soldier’s boot. So the poet is brought down to earth. The inner man is revealed as dark and flawed – literally, a fault line running through the stone defined the way the figure cracked – at the same time that the innards of a marble sculpture are exposed in all their dark and twinkling beauty. Rough jewels: both statue and poet.

    Continue reading...
  • 28 July: St Cuthbert's coffin features in new display at Durham Cathedral - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Artefact, made in 698, is regarded as most important wooden object surviving in England from before Norman conquest

    As the light picked out every detail of the angels and saints, and the runic and Latin inscriptions carved into the oak coffin of a man who died more than 1,300 years ago, the dean of Durham Cathedral struggled to find an appropriately reverent word. “Wow,” Andrew Tremlett finally said. “Wow.”

    Janina Ramirez, a historian, was also seeing for the first time the cathedral’s new display of the coffin of St Cuthbert. She said she had been unable to sleep from excitement the night before. “This is the Tutankhamun’s tomb of the north-east,” she said, “a window into a time in history which some people call the dark ages.”

    Related: Let’s move to Durham, County Durham

    Continue reading...
  • 28 July: A flamingo frenzy, Matisse's personal stash and a Warhol in the attic – the week in art - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Edinburgh fizzes for the festival, a bio-artist makes books bloom with bacteria and low-riders enter high art – all in your weekly dispatch

    Matisse in the Studio
    The diverse world art collection of Henri Matisse is recreated by an exhibition that explores how it shaped his vision.
    Royal Academy, London, 5 August to 12 November.

    Continue reading...
  • 27 July: V&A exhibition sets sail for glory days of luxury ocean liners - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    On show will be luggage belonging to the Duke of Windsor and Wallis Simpson as well as wooden panels from the Titanic

    The Duke of Windsor and Wallis Simpson once boarded the liner SS United States with 100 pieces of matching luggage bought from Maison Goyard of Paris. Next year, some of the cases, with his title stamped in gold, will cross the Atlantic again to feature in a major exhibition at the V&A devoted to the glory days of ocean liners.

    Also making its first return voyage, on loan from a museum in Canada, will be one of the largest surviving decorative features from the first-class lounge of the Titanic, a spectacularly carved wooden panel found floating in the sea after it sank in 1912.

    Continue reading...
  • 27 July: The tongue-sucking genius of Masahisa Fukase – in pictures - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Pierced by pins, tormented by ravens, obscured by bathtub bubbles … the great Japanese photographer created astonishing, disturbing and highly personal images of himself, his family – and his beloved cat Sasuke the Second

    Continue reading...
  • 25 July: Gay bars and tarot cards: Liverpool show celebrates LGBT art - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Walker art gallery is putting on UK’s largest exhibition exploring LGBT themes and history through contemporary art

    Poignant video footage of 170 empty gay bars in 13 UK cities will greet visitors to the UK’s largest exhibition exploring LGBT themes and history through contemporary art.

    The footage, filmed over nine months by artists Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings, is part of an exhibition opening this week at Liverpool’s Walker art gallery. The exhibition is one of a number of cultural activities marking the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act, which in 1967 partially decriminalised homosexuality in England and Wales.

    Continue reading...
  • 23 July: Rose Finn-Kelcey: Life, Belief and Beyond review – subversive power of a quiet wit - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Modern Art Oxford
    Whether performing headstands or re-enacting war, the restless conceptual artist was a true original who shunned the limelight

    Complete uplift: that is one way to describe Rose Finn-Kelcey’s most enduring work, a photograph of the artist performing a perfect handstand on a beach. It is a jubilant scene, immediately stirring the same impulse in the viewer. And yet it is also mysterious, for the pleated skirt she wears seems to fall upwards, covering her torso and head like a vast paper fan so that her identity is concealed. An image of exhilarating spontaneity turns out to emerge from close deliberation: that is one revelation of this enthralling survey.

    Finn-Kelcey (1945-2014) needs and deserves a lifetime retrospective. She was an artist of evergreen originality. But though she came from a celebrated generation of conceptualists, from Susan Hiller to Richard Long, and although she taught a generation of equally famous YBAs, she was impressively leery of limelight and the gallery system. Her art, moreover, is frequently ephemeral and so unpredictable that no two works are ever alike. She avoided the signature look and the market commodity.

    Her aim was for ‘a public art form that is neither pompous, interfering not condescending’

    Continue reading...
  • 21 July: Sex and social realism, Scotland's new gothic folly and Frieze all summer long – the week in art - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    The Frieze fair flings open the doors of its outdoor sculpture garden, Pablo Bronstein’s striking new sculpture is unveiled in Edinburgh and a show devoted to comics opens in Derby – in your weekly dispatch

    Pablo Bronstein
    A gothic folly is connected with a Chinoiserie pavilion by a narrow rose walk in Bronstein’s new permanent commission for Scotland’s superb sculpture park.
    Jupiter Artland, Edinburgh, opening 27 July.

    Continue reading...
  • 21 July: The 10 best things to do this week: Afropunk, Coming Out and Yerma - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    JME and Willow Smith play the black punk festival, Walker Art Gallery highlights queer stories and Billie Piper stars in Lorca’s tale of desire

    Merchant City festival
    If you like street art, music, theatre (including a one-man play about Charles Rennie Mackintosh), dance and some nice artisan food then you should pop to the Merchant City district of Glasgow. A carnival procession kicks off proceedings.
    Various venues, Glasgow, 22-30 July

    Continue reading...
  • 21 July: Princess Diana's music collection to feature in summer exhibition - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Buckingham Palace will host tribute to Diana on 20th anniversary of her death alongside exhibition of gifts to the Queen

    Cassette tapes with music ranging from George Michael to Pavarotti that once belonged to Diana, Princess of Wales, will go on display among gold and silver treasures at Buckingham Palace this summer.

    A small case containing Diana’s eclectic collection of music is part of a special tribute to her on the 20th anniversary of her death. It also includes albums by Rod Stewart, Diana Ross, Céline Dion and Lionel Richie – who once said the princess told him Hello was her favourite song.

    Continue reading...
  • 20 July: Lost Vancouver – in pictures - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    From squats to shops selling logger boots, from clapped-out wooden houses to neon hotspots, photographer Fred Herzog blazed a trail for colour as he captured half a century of change in the Canadian metropolis

    Continue reading...
  • 18 July: Monet's UK parliament paintings to feature in Tate Britain exhibition - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Works will go on show as part of first major exhibition charting the stories of French impressionists who were ‘exiled’ in Britain

    Six paintings by Claude Monet featuring the Houses of Parliament will travel to London from the US, France and Germany for the first major exhibition charting the stories of 19th-century French impressionists who sought refuge in Britain.

    Monet’s gorgeous views of the sun setting through fog over parliament are one of his most highly regarded series of paintings. Though 19 exist, not one is in a British public collection – a situation unlikely to change given an auction value of £40m.

    Continue reading...
  • 17 July: In hot water: Iran through the ages – in pictures - Exhibitions | The Guardian

    Modern life in Iran, from comedic hot baths on the beach to the long shadows cast by war in Iraq

    Continue reading...


admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 5, 2015 By : Category : Exhibitions Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Festival Newsfeed

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 5, 2015 By : Category : Festivals Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Internet Newsfeed

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 16, 2015 By : Category : Net Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Newsfeed – Vid/Podcast Updates

  • 20 July: Post-Page 1 - eyeplug.net/video
  • 20 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 20 July: THE RAINCOATS only loved at night 1981 - eyeplug.net/video
    ear candy from the second album done by this cherished british girlband, just beautiful 🙂http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raincoats
  • 20 July: WASTED YOUTH housewife 1981 - eyeplug.net/video
    h
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video
  • 19 July: - eyeplug.net/video

____________________________________________________________________________

  • 18 September: The Final Episode: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian's Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    This final episode in the Brasil Music Exchange series is dedicated to the very best new music from Recife and Rio de Janeiro. What put Recife on the map was the ground-breaking Manguebeat cultural movement that kick-started an unprecedented creative explosion and long-time major music capital of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro is most associated with bossa nova and samba. Join us in this farewell to the Paralympics with this explosive last episode
  • 14 September: Episode Nine: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    São Paulo is a megacity of over 20 million people and it’s the buzz at the heart of the independent music scene in Brazil. We feature music from the forefront of the SP new wave right now, with Metá Metá and their “apocalyptic afropunk”, the gorgeous pop melodies of Tulipa, indie rock princes Holger and hip hop star Criolo.
  • 11 September: Episode Eight: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    This episode is dedicated to Northern Brazil with new sounds from Amazonas state, Pará, Ceará and beyond. Right now a northern influence is taking the whole country by storm. Raw tecnobrega beats, twangy guitarrada riffs and bouncy carimbó rhythms are working their way into the national soundtrack. We go to the source
  • 7 September: Paralympic Special: Brazil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    This is the Brasil Music Exchange Paralympic special, bringing you the best new music direct from Brazil! This show is powered by Brazil’s bass-heavy beats - from dub and hip hop to sci-fi ragga. We go nationwide and check out the new Bahia Bass scene with tracks by Som Peba and A.MA.SSA. We play Rio rasteirinha by OMULU and outer-space bass by São Paulo’s sants and Cybass. Plus deep dub masters Digitaldubs, tropical bass kings Tropkillaz, hip hop maverick MC Sombra and more!
  • 21 August: The Close: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    This is the last episode of the Brasil Music Exchange! Over the past month we’ve brought you the best that Brasil has to offer. In this final episode Jody Gillett celebrates the women of new Brazilian music. Our all-female playlist includes the São Paulo vanguard sounds of Juçara Marçal, Tulipa and Céu, Bahia’s new voice Jurema, veteran carimbó queen Dona Onete and much more.
  • 19 August: Episode Five: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Brasil Music Exchange brings you the best new music direct from Brazil! This episode features cover versions of vintage classics and long-lost gems by the new generation. Our ever diverse playlist goes from samba to ska, choro to forró. Playlist highlights include the traditional Bahian choir As Ganhadeiras de Itapuã, São Paulo young guns Bixiga 70 and the deep treasure that is Goma-Laca.
  • 17 August: Episode Four: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Brasil Music Exchange brings you the best new music direct from Brazil. This show puts the spotlight on outstanding recent releases from across the country. The playlist features national stars Criolo and Emicida, solo debuts by Donatinho and Russo Passapusso and new tracks from Anelis Assumpção and folk disrupter Siba. We go from hip hop to samba-rock, afro-punk to indie pop. Come connect with the independent artists reinventing the sound of Brazil
  • 12 August: Episode Three: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    We’re continuing our trip across Brazil with great new sounds from the heart of the country. This show dedicated to the central zone focuses on music from the capital, Brasilia, rock city Goiânia and indie hub Belo Horizonte. Our playlist highlights include rising psychedelic stars Boogarins, alt-rock storytellers A Fase Rosa and blazing Brazilian hip hop by Flávio Renegado and Flora Matos.
  • 10 August: Episode Two: Brasil Music Exchange - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Artists in Brazil have a secret weapon - the incredible heritage of a country that is a bonafide musical giant. Right now they are also plugged into global currents and making their own innovative, unique and super-accessible music. This show is a whirlwind trip featuring 12 new tracks from artists across the whole country, from the deep south right up to the Amazon.
  • 5 August: Brasil Music Exchange: Olympic Special - The Guardian Music Podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Fresh from Brazil, this is a great introduction into the very best new sounds from all over. You’ll hear the latest releases from Samba’s woman at the end of the world, Elza Soares, Salvador’s brilliant BaianaSystem and hip hop star Criolo. Plus brand new debuts: sweetness from Fioti, deepness from Ziminino and much more.
  • 16 March: Ben Beaumont-Thomas on the ultimate crate-digging labels - the Guardian Radio Hour podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    The Guardian’s Ben Beaumont-Thomas plays some of the best tracks from the new slew of crate-digging labels
  • 10 March: Stewart Lee on standup comedy and music – the Guardian Radio Hour podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Stewart Lee joins us for a cruise through the alternative comedy scene in the 80s and the bands that helped soundtrack it
  • 3 March: John McEntire on Chicago's music scene - The Guardian Radio Hour podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Super producer John McEntire from Tortoise gives us a snapshot of Chicago’s alternative music scene through the ages from Howlin’ Wolf to Jim O’Rourke
  • 24 February: Richard Dawson on the naked voice – the Guardian Radio Hour podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Leftfield folk singer Richard Dawson takes us on a trip through the outer fringes of unaccompanied singing
  • 17 February: Fat White Family on outsider ballads - the Guardian Radio Hour podcast - The Guardian's Music Podcast
    Soap dodgers Saul and Lias from Fat White Family play us an hour of their favourite weird and woozy outsider ballads

admin

Boo Eyeplug acts as webmaster/designer for the Eyeplug site. Not the most social of creatures and with several personality issues, and rather exotic, eccentric tastes for obscure ‘cultish’ stuff which makes his ramblings seem even more sweetly abstract and often annoying.

More Posts - Website

June 16, 2015 By : Category : News Tags:, ,
0 Comment